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View Full Version : What kind of camera do you use?


Chris Kilroy
12-13-2002, 02:50 PM
I suppose this topic of sort of a poll.

I use a Canon D60 DSLR with Canon 28-80mm USM, and Canon 100-400mm IS USM lenses.

What about you? images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

http://www.airdisaster.com/graphics/cam.jpg

Anonymous
12-15-2002, 01:47 AM
I haven't made the "jump" to complete digital as yet. That is because my main mission is slide trading. I swap with a group of masterclass shooters across the United States

OK, I can't quite post a pic of my current "main gun" but all the pics uploaded thus far were made with either a Nikon F4 or F5. Currently I use an F5 with a 28-70 F2.8 zoom as my "normal" lens. Below is what it looks like in the unlikely event you haven't seen one

http://www.imagepower.de/IMAGES/imgEQUIPMENT/AFS2870_2.jpg

and three ancient Nikon FM's.

My images were scanned with a Nikon LS-4000 scanner.

cicadajet
12-15-2002, 03:43 AM
Canon D30 with the same lens as Chris, but looking forward to seeing everyone's vintage slides and prints on here in the coming weeks and months..(and years..)

clap.gif

Tom

Chris Starnes
12-15-2002, 07:20 AM
I use the D60 as well with a Canon A2 film camera also in my bag...looking very hard at one of those 100-400s :-D

Chris

E.M. Bell
12-15-2002, 06:58 PM
Howdy all,

I dont have the deep pocket books, so no fancy Digital SLR on a railroaders salary. My primary weapon is a Cannon Rebel G, supported by a Standard 50mm and a cannon 75-300 zoom. My secondary is a rugged old Cannon AV-1 suported by a standard 50 mm, a 35-105, and a 75-300mm. I also use a Sony FD75 digital for those "grab" shots.

railohio
12-17-2002, 04:57 AM
Let's see... My main body is a Nikon N80, supported by an FM-10 for manual work and an EM for the dangerous assignments. Glass in the bag includes a 28-80/3.3-5.6 AF-G, 75-300/4.5-5.6 AF, 24/2.8 AF-D, 50/1.8 Series E, and 200/4 AI. Hope to pick up a replacment for the 28-80 real soon.

JJMDiMunno
12-17-2002, 05:47 AM
Presently, I'm using a Canon EOS Rebel G (prints for the website), and a Canon EOS Rebel X (slides for publication, archival). I also haven't been taken in by the digital revolution yet. Lenses for the Canon's are 35-80MM F4.0/5.6, and 75-300 f4.0/5.6.

I'm very impressed with both of these non-expensive cameras. Been using both for 4 years now.

GM&Ofan
12-17-2002, 06:57 AM
My camera of choice is my recently-purchased Canon D60, but I also occasionally use my EOS-1v HS. I have the Canon 28-135 IS zoom lens, a Tamron SP 90mm macro, and my favorite is my 300mm f4 IS telephoto. I'm looking to get a wide-angle zoom (maybe the Sigma 15-30?) for the D60, and maybe the 100-400 at some point in the future.

Up until this past July, I used Minolta gear, having a Maxxum 7 with a 24-105 zoom, a 100mm macro, and a 300 f4. I sold it all and moved to Canon, primarily because of their Image Stabilization lenses.

Chris Starnes
12-17-2002, 02:17 PM
Good choice Bart! smilewink.gif

That makes three of us with the D60, I can't say a bad thing about mine!

Along with the D60 I carry a Sigma 28-105 f2.8, Canon 75-300, f4, and a Sigma 400 f5.6.

Chris

PolishAir42
12-17-2002, 10:28 PM
Im a lost little boy from Illinois who uses a Sony F707...

I havent been to a railyard in fi...never but that could change images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif Oh wait is that a 744 overflying on the downwind to 14R? Yes yes...

pullin4u
12-18-2002, 05:36 AM
For slides and prints I'm using a Minolta...ahh...hmmm....well, something or other. Haven't used it for going on two years. Switched to digital a couple of years ago and haven't looked back. Primarily I use a Sony DSC-P71 (goes with me EVERYDAY to work); otherwise a Sony CD-1000 provides unlimited image capacity for my adventures. (it writes directly to mini-discs)

I scan my slides and negatives with a Minolta Dimage Scan Dual; prints and whatever else with an HP Scan Jet 4100C (just about killed it but it still works...for now).
Paint Shop Pro 7 allows modifications and touch ups of all images if desired...

Regards,

-George Widener
images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

ddavies
12-19-2002, 12:35 PM
Nikon D1 with 18-35, 28-200, 80-200 and 80-400 auto focus zooms (you have to multiply the fl by 1.5 to get 35mm equivalent fl on D1).

Nikon 990 with wide angle and 2x tele aux lenses that got me started in digital.

Four Nikons, Leica, non-auto focus lenses and Crown Graffic (press camera) gathering dust.

Robby
12-21-2002, 06:24 AM
OK, I'm insane, there I admitted it.

Canon D60
Olympus C-4040
Canon A2
Canon Elan
Canon Elan 2
Canon Rebel 2000
Canon Rebel XL
50 F1.0 L
50 F1.8
28-70 f2.8 L
80-200 f2.8 L
300 f4.0 L
Sigmon 28-80 f2.8

New Nikon ED Slide Scanner.
Old Nikon LS2000 Slide Scanner.

All of my posted pics so far have come off the old LS and are no where near the quality of the ED. Someday I'll go back and rescan.

Rumor is Santa has another big white lens under the tree this year. 35-350 maybe? I'm afraid to pinch the box too hard...........

Shoot K25 (not much left in the freezer), K64, ES100, ES200, Tmax 400, 400CN

That's right, no kids yet. Merry Christmas everyone, great site guys.

Bryan Jones
12-22-2002, 07:14 AM
I use a Canon Elan 7E with the following lenses: Canon 50mm F1.8, Sigma 28-200mm F3.5-5.6, and a Canon 75-300mm F4-5.6. Still have a Canon 28-90mm F3.5-5.6 that came with the camera that I have never sold. I use Fuji Astia and Provia 400F films.
Digital camera is a Nikon Coolpix 995.
For scanning slides I use a Minolta DiMage Scan Elite II scanner which features the Digital ICE cubed package, which removes dust, scratches and can also restore faded colors and reduce grain.
Plans are to replace the Sigma 28-200 lens in January with the Canon 28-135IS F3.5-5.6 lens and to probably aquire the Canon 100-400L IS F4.5-5.6 when the tax check arrives (if I can wait that long). The summer may bring a digital body, but not until I have gotten all of the new glass I want first.

Bryan Jones

barackley
12-25-2002, 04:41 AM
Well, I as well haven't gone the digital route yet, but I am looking. After years of using Canon equipment, I switched to Nikon last year. I am currently using an N90s with a 28-80, and a 70-300 zoom. I am looking to add a couple more lenses, and another body or two to increase my flexibility,
Brian Rackley

JMW
12-28-2002, 04:12 AM
Most of my work is done with a Canon EOS ElanII with the standard 28-85mm lense. I still use my trusty 24 year old Canon AT-1 on occassions with a 135mm lense. For grab shots I can post on the web I use low end Kodak and Canon digital cameras.

I'm working on purchasing my third flatbed scanner due to burning out the first two scanning a few hundred photos.

I've been extremely impressed with the majority of the images on this site and look forward to future postings.

JMW clap.gif

fjcaron
12-31-2002, 06:23 AM
I recently bought a Canon EOS D60, I use a 28-135mm IS lense and that's the only one I have currently. Come tax time however I plan on getting the 16-35mm or the 100-400mm, tough choice.

Chris Kilroy
12-31-2002, 08:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Frank Caron:
I recently bought a Canon EOS D60, I use a 28-135mm IS lense and that's the only one I have currently. Come tax time however I plan on getting the 16-35mm or the 100-400mm, tough choice.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi Frank,

Welcome to RailPictures.Net!

I use the 100-400 IS lense and I can't sing its praises enough -- truly the finest combination of body/lense I've ever had the priviledge of using! nod.gif

Bryan Jones
12-31-2002, 10:30 PM
Frank,

If I were you I would buy the 100-400IS lens rather than the 16-35mm. More than likely you will get more use out of the telephoto zoom rather than the wide angle. Buy the big zoom and you can always pick up a fixed 20mm to give you the wide angle you'd like (20mm would equal 32mm on the D60 I think).
I myself just ordered a Canon 28-135mm IS lens from the local shop I deal with yesterday and when I get my taxes I plan to get the 100-400mm IS (have considered the 70-200 F2.8 IS and a 2x converter too).

Bryan

Mike Woodruff
01-04-2003, 01:26 AM
Luddite that I am, I've yet to purchase an autofocus camera, much less a digital! I carry either Olympus or Minolta bodies and lenses in my camera bag, depending on my mood, however many of the older slides I've been posting were shot using an Argus C-3 "Brick." Others were shot with a Konica-S, a Yashica TL, and there is even one shot of mine in the database that was taken with a Kodak Instamatic (can you guess which one?)

skyliner
01-04-2003, 10:25 PM
Mike:
Good to see some other Argus C-3 shots! I switched over to a Nikon FTN in 1971, and have shot with several FM/FM2s with MD-12 motor drives since 1978.
George

NikonF5
01-08-2003, 03:40 AM
Hey....

I am new to the board....

I use a Nikon F5, BABY!!!! And it rocks!!!!!

Other gear includes:

Nikkor 24-85 AF-S "G" lens
Nikkor 70-300mm ED
Tokina 20-35mm
Nikkon 50mm f/1.4D (about to be sold)
Nikon SB-28 flash
Bogen 3021BPRO tripod
Markins M10 ballhead

Gear is carried in a Tamrac Pro System 12 shoulder bag

Film?? Only three types of film in my bag: Fuji Velvia (RVP), Provia 100F (RDP III) as well as Provia 400F (RHP III)!!!!!

Now it is time to start shooting some rail stuff!!!

Cheers,

<FONT COLOR="black" SIZE="1">[ January 08, 2003 03:07 PM: Message edited 1 time, lastly by Mark W ]</font>

the_full_nixon
01-12-2003, 01:28 AM
Hello all,

I shoot with a Minolta X-700 with a 28-70 on the head end. My secondary is a Fujica AZ-1 with a Fujinon 50mm and a couple other lenses... takes great pictures too! I'm working on getting a Nikon FM3A. I need something that can work in the cold without failing me, cause a lot of my picture taking is in the frigid cold north winters. This is what the FM3A is for. I also shoot with a Yashica-D Twin lens reflex camera, for my 120 film.

I capture it on E100SW, EBX, Portra 160NC and VC, TMZ 3200, T400CN, even Royal Gold. Some others in there too. Can you tell I don't like Fuji film?


Adam

tarnett
03-05-2003, 04:47 PM
Primary camera is a Minolta XTSI with a Sigma 50-500mm lens. For still shots and roster shots I use a Minolta X-370 with a variety of MF lenses.

Todd Arnett

Wmas1960
03-07-2003, 05:20 AM
This post relates in part to 3 different threads here. My equipment, Selling Photos and Bring on the Snow Shots.

I have pretty much gotten out of using film. I got a Nikon D100 a few months ago and was using a Coolpix 990 before then. I was really taken with the economics of not having to buy film and pay for processing. Also being able to use my photos right away through Photoshop without having to scan has been a real benefit. I do get dust specks on some of my pictures due to dust on the CCD but I can easilly touch them out with PS. I have one right now that puts a little dot on most of my pictures in the sky. A little airbrush and it is gone. I guess I was getting pretty fed up with my pictures coming back from the labs with dust or scratches. Digital is great. If I were more serious about publishing in magazines or such I might have a different opinion though. Or am I wrong on that. Are there any publishing opportunities out there yet for non slide photos? I never did get into shooting slides. At 3002 x 2000 I wonder if the D100 delivers files appropriate for publishing use.

I was reading in another thread about making money with Rail Photos. I had thought of Calanders, Prints and Postcards maybe. Selling through Train shows maybe or ebay or whatever. I haven't uploaded anything here yet or on Airliners.net but was wondering if people do actually get contacted about posted photos on these sites. I have been taking a lot of shots lately and would like to share them but am afraid of copyright problems and whether doing so would actually generate any good interest in my stuff.

Back to equipment, I use the D100 and usually a 24-85mm 3.5/4.5 AF-S G lens for trains. So far I have been able to get pretty close at the sites where I have been. For the planes and occasionally with trains I have an 80-200mm 2.8 AF D Nikkor Zoom that I also got with the D100.

WmAS

http://members.aol.com/wmas1960/WebPosts/640UP5027.jpg

Greg
03-14-2003, 09:42 PM
Canon AE-1 and 50mm and 80-200 mm lense.

oltmannd
03-25-2003, 01:08 PM
Since 1972, for most of the pictures I've been submitting, I used a Mamiya-Sekor 500DTL and either a 50 mm, 135 mm or 200mm generic fixed focal length lens.

For the past 10 years or so, I've been using a Minolta 370 and X7A with a 50mm or 135 fixed or sometimes a 60-300mm zoom (not a great lens...)

-Don

n01jd1
03-26-2003, 03:51 AM
I currently use 2 Konica FT-1's usually with a 52mm F1.8 lens, I also have a Konica 50mm F1.4 lens, a Konica 35-70mm zoom, a 28-210mm zoom and an 85-205mm zoom

westbnsf
05-16-2003, 04:04 AM
Hi! I am new to the forums although I have posted photos before. I use Sony's DSCF707 for all of my pictures. I have been using it for about a year now and am very happy with it!

Marlin Thorman

willie6622
06-07-2003, 05:08 PM
I'm new to 35mm photography & would like some advice on an easy to use slide film camera/lens. I've been shooting strictly digital, but want to do some slide photography. I don't know squat about SLR cameras, and any help/ suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I'm looking for something in the $500.00 range.
Thanks guys!

Chris Starnes
06-09-2003, 01:24 AM
Willie,

The Canon EOS Rebel series is a great line of cameras to start looking at for a beginner camera. They are very basic, to the point, and affordable.

Chirs

Robert28
06-09-2003, 03:03 AM
Hello all,

I shoot a Pentax ZX50 with either a Pentax 35-80mm or a Tamron 80-210mm zoom. Most often I use the 80-210mm. Film could be just about any type of print film at 200 or 400 ASA. Usually Kodak or Fuji. As for slides I shoot 200 ASA Kodak Elite Chrome. I am thinking of converting to shooting only slides if I can find a good slide scanner at a decent price.

Trainman51
06-17-2003, 06:43 PM
I use a Canon Rebal 2000 with an Canon 35-80mm f4, and an Canon 75-300mm USM.

Ken Carr
06-21-2003, 10:52 PM
I agree with Chris, the Canon Rebel series provides a lot for the buck and meets the $500 price range and can be a mid range type of camera. If you shop around you can get a few lenses, camera body and filters all for $500. I myself have three canons two AE-1's that are nearing retirement after twenty-twenty-five plus years and a Canon Rebel TI, which is now my primary camera for fast photography, using sigma lenses of 24-80 and 70-300 I can capture just about anything.
For capturing fast moving trains I have found it to be easy to use, and the it advances fast enough to keep up with most trains, the down side on auto focus during dusk it has a tendency to either jump to flash mode when I don't want it to or after the first shot takes to long to adjust for the second shot. Other wise it handled nicely

Silagi
07-06-2003, 07:33 PM
I use a Nikon N80 with Nikon 28-85, Tokina 28-210, and Tamron 70-300mm lenses. Some day soon I hope to move up to digital, but for now I am shooting prints. Some people say I am nuts for shooting prints instead of slides but it is my personal preference. Besides, what is the diffence when I can get results like this with Kodak Gold 100, Target 1 hour processing, and an $85 flatbed scanner.....

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=20169

Richard Silagi

wdgodwin
07-28-2003, 07:25 PM
All film stuff here. No digital - not even an auto focus in the bunch...yet!
Canon AE1-Program
Canon A-1
Canon F-1New
Yashica Mat-124G
Mamiya RB67SD (2 each)
Omega Crown Graphic
Omega 45D

Chris Starnes
07-28-2003, 07:30 PM
Nothing wrong with that list you posted, David! Those are some gems!

Even though 99.9% of my stuff is digital now, I still bag a Canon A-1 with Provia slide film that I use from time to time :wink:

Chris

Guilford350
08-16-2003, 11:58 PM
I use a Kodak DX3600 and that's all I use. I know it may not be as expensive or nearly as professional when compared to some of the equipment you guys use but it sure gets the job done. Although, I am planning on getting a new camera. Right now I'm looking at the Canon Powershot A70, it fits right in my price range.

mojo628
08-19-2003, 08:11 PM
Guilford350,

I currently use the Canon Powershot A70. It's a great little camera. You're not gonna get the faraway zoom shots but if you're fairly close to your subject the photo should come out nice. The nighttime flash mode leaves a little to be desired but other than that it's a great little camera. I'd say about 90% of my pictures on RP.net are with the A70.

I also use a Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Once I find an extra $1500 in coins in the couch cushions I think I'll buy a Canon 10D. :wink:

TimChgo9
08-21-2003, 07:03 PM
I currently have in my bag

A Minolta XG-M with a 135mm telephoto, and, I believe a 50mm wide angle. I am looking to get a zoom lens for those close up shots. I shoot digital with a Fuji FIne Pix 1300, or 2600, the 2600 is new, and I have yet to use it.

I am hoping to upgrade to a higher end digital camera, but I won't be ditching the Minolta anytime soon, I have been using it for 10 years, and it has performed superbly. I usually shoot 400 speed film, but on occasion use 800 speed.

For close up shots using the Fuji FinePix 1300, I focus the camera through a pair of 16x50 binoculars. (field of view is 272 ft at 1000 yards) After a little practice, it takes great close-ups. The lens on the Fuji is small enough to fit in the eyepiece of the binoculars. It's a bit unorthodox, but it has produced some really nice close up train photos. Not every one of them is a success when I do go for the "binocular shot" it takes some patience to line up the shot, but I mount the Fuji on my tripod, and that helps alot.

Curtis Wininger
08-24-2003, 12:21 AM
10D with Sigma 17-35, Canon 70-300
Rebel 2000

* when I get a chance to get out and the weather is nice

Jonathan Guy
09-02-2003, 06:51 AM
I traded my older Canon FD gear in about 2 months ago.

My film equipment is now:
Canon Elan 7E
Canon 50mm
Canon 28-80
Canon 70-300

I'm hoping to have a Canon D10 by the first of the year and some faster glass like a 70-200 f2.8. :)

Most of my shots on railpictures.net are shot with a Nikon Coolpix3100 in HiRes mode with a 256 SanDisk Ultra CF. This little camera gives me 3.2mp and an optical 35-80 effective zoom. The camera is small and will fit in my back pocket so its easy to keep handy.

http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=623

JG

cnw8542
09-03-2003, 05:48 AM
My camera bag consists of:
-Canon EOS Rebel 2000 (The beginner body)
-Canon EOS Elan II (The rebels replacement!)
-Canon 50mm F1.8 (cheap, but one THE only lens for roster shots!)
-Sigma 70-200 EX APO F2.8 APO (My workhorse)
-Sigma 28-80 F3.5-5.6 (no longer used)
-Sigma 100-300 F4.5-6.7 (no longer used)
-Tamron 2X teleconverter (nothin like 400mm@ F5.6 for a fraction of the cost!!)
-Sunpak 555 handle mount flash

-Film is Fuji Provia 100F for slides (The ONLY slide film to use , contrary to what the kodachrome "kult" says!! :lol: ) I may mix it up with the new Velvia 100F. For black and white I use Kodak TC400N or Ilford XP2 super (love the chromogenic C41's). I've tried to get away from color prints, as slide processing through A&I is WAAAY cheaper.

-I am looking to dump off the rebel 2000 and move up to the EOS 3, and I am also looking into a EOS 10D. As far as new glass, I am looking at either the Sigma 28-70 EX F2.8 lens, or the new Tamron 28-75 F2.8. The Canon 85mm F1.8 is also on the wish list.
Dustin Trejo
Click Here (http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=1275) to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

mu23
09-03-2003, 10:43 AM
Sony DSC-F717
Imager: 2/3" 5.0 Megapixel Effective Super HAD™ CCD
(5.2 Megapixel Gross)
Zoom: 5X Optical/2X Digital/10X Total
Filter Diameter: 58mm
Focal Length: 9.7 – 48.5mm
35mm Equivalent: 38 – 190mm
Aperture: f 2.0-2.4
Shutter Speed: Auto, 1/30 – 1/2000 sec,
Manual 30 sec – 1/1000 sec
Manual Exposure: ±2.0 EV, 1/3 EV steps
NightShot® Infrared System
NightFraming System

Also a Sony P-92 and a Sony P-52 and an ancient (4 years!) Olympus Camedia 1.3 mp thing. Bought the Olympus a few years back thinking I'd get into RR photography, but it wasn't up to the task, so I waited until this past July to try the hobby once again. The Olympus does produce a remarkably clear image, but I never got used to the user interface and that put me off the brand; entirely subjective.

Scanning and printing is all Canon: i850 printer and 5000F scanner.
I've had a passion for Canon products ever since I got my first calculator when I was 12, but Sony's just too darn sexy (at the moment) when it comes to cameras. (Now, I didn't say they were any good, just sexy.) Am falling fast for the new F-828. I've heard that in the past cameras had some sort of chemically based memory, but I think somebody's joshin me. :lol:

Speaking of scanners; my other scanners are a Uniden BC895XLT (base) and a Racing Electronics (Relm) RE2000 Alpha (hand-held). Also have a Yaesu 5000 something or the other, little DC-Daylight thing for travel.

iCe
09-09-2003, 11:50 PM
I can see that I have the worst camera here....sigh

should I tell you guys what it is?

....

.....

why not, Fuji FinePix 40i

....now how sad is that?

mu23
09-10-2003, 11:51 AM
The 40i isn't a bad camera at all. It's fast, compact, has a tripod mount, and plays MP3's for those long times between trains. The 40i has twice the megapixels as my first digicam and I'll be thinking about your camera every time my MP3 player digs into my side, which is often! When I go out train hunting it's often with a friend who's on the staff of the photography department at the local college. She has most of her resources tied up in film, but enjoys shooting trains with a digital camera. The camera she uses is half as good as mine and yet her pictures always look better. Why? Because she's been doing photography since she was a kid and I haven't. It's not the equipment, it's how much you use it. We stood side by side at Harpers Ferry taking pictures last weekend and hers are beautiful and mine are headed to the recycle bin! It's about practice, reading up on the subject, and studying the photographs of people who's work you enjoy. If you can't get out to the tracks as much as you like, take pictures of the car, the house, the dog and then when you do get out on location, you'll be that much more ahead of the game. Digital film costs nothing to develop, so it's free practice. :)

Chris Starnes
09-10-2003, 02:05 PM
ICE,

It is not so much about your camera, but about your 'eye' for composing photos. Develop your style for photography first, better camera equipment will come in the future....

Chris

iCe
09-10-2003, 09:53 PM
Acutally I have another mp3 player...lol

Yea, I guess the camera is alright. But when I tried aviation photography.....no optical zoom is a killer!

Guilford350
09-10-2003, 11:26 PM
ICE, you take very nice photos with the camera that you use. I have a two and half year old Kodak DX3600 but it still takes some pretty nice shots.

iCe
09-11-2003, 12:02 AM
Guilford350, My camera has 0.2 more MPs but yours has 2x optical zoom which mine doesn't. I'd say we are in the same boat! :D

However, I think your photos are a lot nicer! Guess that means more practicing for me.

Bob
09-13-2003, 12:41 AM
I use Olympus digitals, a C2100uz, and an E20n.

Bob

"May the saddest days of your future be no worse than the happiest days of your past"

Click Here (http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=1396) to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

TimChgo9
09-26-2003, 04:27 AM
Well, in my post about what's in my bag, I had included a Fuji Fine Pix 1300 as my digital... well that has changed. I had a brief fling with a Fuji Fine Pix 2650 which works welll, and takes a great photo, and with the 3x optical zoom, it's not a bad camera. Well, that has been replaced by the Fuji Fine Pix S5000, which, is one great camera, for a mid level digital. It takes photos up to 6.0 Megapixels,(although, the box says it's a 3.1 Megapixel camera, it says something about 6 million recorded pixels, and 3.1 million effective pixels... go figure) has a 10x zoom, and 2.2x digital zoom. Settings for shooting in low light, and it has different settings available for focus (manual, automatic, and continuous automatic.) and can shoot black and white. It has an auto mode, and a couple of different programmed modes, as well as a manual mode where you can change shutter and aperture settings. In addition, it has a lens retainer ring that can accept two different telephoto lenses made by Fuji for the S3800, S5000 and S7000. I was out experimenting with it after work today, and will post some shots later in the week. For the price (and i got mine as a gift) it is a great camera, and takes good, sharp photos with excellent color. If you want a better camera, but can't afford a high end, this may be worth checking out.

Bob
09-26-2003, 04:18 PM
The camera doesn't "take" the picture, it holds the picture until it's processed. This applies to all cameras. The photographer "takes", that is "sees" the picture, and, with enough practice, know how to use to camera to properly capture the instant. In other words, the way to Carnegie Hall is practice, practice, practice.

TimChgo9
09-26-2003, 10:04 PM
Bob.

You're right, actually, getting the right photo takes some patience, and also knowing your subject, taking care to note of lighting, in the case of out door pictures, noting the sun's position, and finding the right place to shoot from. When I go out shooting pictures, and it's a new place, I use my camera to check "angles" and find the best place to shoot from, and I also use both telephoto, and wide angle lenses, and in the case of my S5000, the zoom feature, I find a "frame" for my picture and wait for the train to pass through the area I have selected and snap the photo. That method works best for me. Just whipping out the camera and pressing the shutter button resulted in plenty of wasted rolls of film on my part. (I'll never forget the first time I took out that Minolta, with a four pack of film, and in two days, managed to shoot four over or under exposed rolls worth of pictures) Now, with digital cameras, it's nice to be able to "edit" myself out there "in the field" as opposed to waiting for a roll of film to come back.

My uncle is a free lance nature photographer, and he has given me some help as far as technique. My oldest brother shoots fire scenes, and fire trucks and he has helped as well.

Bob
09-26-2003, 10:22 PM
The word photography means "paint with light". Therefore, in my opinion, the best thing we can do, as photographers, is learn to read the light.

Martin K. O'Toole
10-02-2003, 01:58 AM
My camera history is a jagged one. I began seriously using a family Kodak of unknown model that was limited to 1/30 and 1/80 shutter speed. It didn’t do too badly and was a clear improvement over the previous box cameras in 127 and 620. I then borrowed an Argus C3 rangefinder 35mm. The focusing gear would slip and shots thought to be in focus often were not with disastrous results. Additionally, I was reading too much Lucius Beebe and thought that high shutter speeds and wide open apertures were the thing. Fatal combo for many shots!

Finally in October, 1968 I progressed into the then modern age getting a Honeywell Pentax H1a. That served exceedingly well - particularly compared to previous equipment - that I was satisfied for quite some time. I did add a Yashica Mat 124 for B&W work in 1970 and used it regularly in conjunction with the Pentax for most of the 1970s. In 1974 I tried using a Crown Graphic 4x5, but decided I wasn’t good enough in the dark room to make it more useful than the Yashica.

The Pentax died on an Alco pilgromage to Mingo Junction in 1978 and was replaced with a Pentax MX. I used my now standard 28 mm lenses, 50 or 55 mm (forget which) and a 70-210 (or so) zoom. The Pentax MX set was the best I had to date and, while fully manual, was easy to work.

Unfortunately, an office I was working in was burglarized in about 1985 and the Pentax vanished. I had fallen onto economic hard times as well and was reduced to the Pentax K1000 and similar lenses. They were less satisfactory than the MX, but I was back in school for post-grad work and didn’t get track side as often.

Upon escape in 1989 I immediately celebrated by getting a Canon EOS 630 with standard lens, 35 to 135 mm zoom and 70-210 mm zoom. This was my standard until 1997 when I finally made a decision I had been playing with for nearly 20 years. Several friends who were outstanding photographers used the Bronica series of 2 1/4" SLRs with absolutely eye-popping results. Steinheimer, if I recall aright, stated in an article in Rail Classics he often used a Bronica as well. One of my Bronica friends, however, had shifted to Hasselblad. Steinheimer claims the Hasselblads will not hold up in the field with the kind of abuse railfans heap on them. Never the less, I melted my charge card and got the Hasselblad. I have now added the Varigon 140 - 280mm, Distagon 50 mm, Planar 80mm and an ancient, albeit mint, Sonnar 250mm. (Keep in mind that 120 converts to 35mm at the rate of 8/5 so the 80mm standard is about the same as the 50mm in 35.) So far I have avoided destroying the Hasselblad and have had some shots (I usually shot slides) that are eminently satisfactory.

The Canon is on the verge of disintegration, so I have augmented my 35mm with the Nikon F5, standard 50 mm lens, AF-S Nikkor 24-85mm and the workhorse AF VR Nikkor 80-400mm.

Film: I used Agfachrome 50 almost exclusively in the late 1960s to mid 1970s. However, it now shows a distinct purplish shift. That bad ole Kodak, particularly Kodachrome, still looks great. I occasionally get some Fuji, but presently like the looks the E100VS and E100G that Kodak has in both 35 mm and 120. The final inspiration for the Hasselblad was the excellent results I got shooting some 120 on the C&C on a steam trip. I used Kodak Kodachrome and was stunned by the projected results. Of course, when I got the Hasselblad I found exactly one roll of Kodachrome in 120 as it was a short-lived experiment and was dropped. E-6 is my only real option and I have become reconciled to it.

I suspect I have made my last major emulsion-based purchase. Of interest to me now is getting the feed back on the best 120 and 35mm scanners to convert some of the earlier stuff to digital form. I did get a cheapie HP Photo Smart S 20 to play with, but I expect I will have to get something like the Nikon Coolscan - particularly with the ICE feature to correct all the decay of years. Advice is always welcome.

My advice to the newer railfan photographer is scrimp, save and get the best camera you possibly can. Remember, you will have much more invested in time and expense in getting trackside than you will in the camera. So, digital or emulsion, get the best you possibly can and avoid regrets later.

Martin K. O'Toole

TimChgo9
10-02-2003, 11:32 AM
Actually, after reading the posts

Photography can mean alot of things to alot of people. As my uncle put it, "what does the photograph mean to you?" I said it before, photography is an art form, and what is a beautiful photo composition in one person's eye may be rather pedestrian in another's, so it's very subjective. When I shoot my pictures, I go for the ones that I think show the power of trains, and I shoot various angles, lighting, and other effects. I have almost 600 pictures in my collection, many of which were shot with a low resolution digital, so they won't be posted here. In alot of my pictures, I used a zoom, or telephot lens to capture the train in the distance, because to me, (if I may wax artistic for a moment) when I catch the locomotives in a close up, they appear to be bearing down, intent on getting the job done. It's the power of the locomotive I am after, but, then my interpretation of what I shoot, and the method by which I do it, may be way off the mark in someone else's mind. But, that's okay.

My uncle is a nature photographer, and he tends to go for the darker, more dramatic shot. His pictures of Mt. St. Helens are awesome, I don't do nature, unless it's a pretty sunset. The point is, take your pictures, enjoy what you do. If you derive pleasure from it, that's okay, it's what you did it for. On more than one occasion pictures that are my favorites did not get accepted here for posting. To any new comers, don't let the rejections get to you, even though it's hard. Just make sure you are using a good camera, whether it's digital or film photography you are doing.

Speaking of cameras, after shooting nearly 100 pictures with the new Fuji, (and tossing nearly 60% in to the recycle bin) I have found the S5000 to be an great camera. The pictures I have kept (and I have posted a couple of them) are great. The camera's drawbacks are it's size (it could be about a 1/4" bigger all around) and it's weight (about 14 oz with batteries) other than the light weight, I love the camera, and it will probably be awhile before I invest in anything else digital.

nevardmedia
10-18-2003, 12:14 AM
I have a cheapy Canon Powershot A40 for my first experiment into digital photography. Fine for web based snaps where there are no demands beyond screen res.

For my more serious photography I still use conventional film cameras
Nikons FE and FM. Lenses 17mm thru to 400mm. I still use an Old Rollei 6x6 camera for odd magazine commisions (auto photography).

I used to use exclusively colour transparency, I now am a fan of colour neg taking scans straight from the film. The results allow more conttrol over shadow detail than from tranny.

I quite fancy one of the new Nikon SLRs, maybe a D100. Will the old AI Nikkors work with one of these? I appreciate certain auto functions won't work.

S.C. Vermillion
10-23-2003, 02:10 AM
My newest Camera is a Olympus IS 50QD with a 28-120mm ED lense. I use a Vanguard tripod.

I use to use a Toshiba PDR2300 2.2megapixel Digital for railroad pics but it did'nt deliver the clarity I wanted.

My dream camera is a Kodak DCS-14N but that's 5 grand more than I am willing to spend.

Shawn

Greg
10-25-2003, 12:22 AM
Since my last post I got a Kodak DX4330 in April 2003, and then about a week ago I got a Digital rebel.(Oct. 2003)

iCe
10-25-2003, 03:55 AM
Greg? Is that you? lol :D

busyEMT
10-26-2003, 03:42 PM
Good bye film, processing and scanning... I talked the wife into approving a Fuji FinePix S5000. Now, where is the "No Bad Motive" feature on this thing?

iCe
10-27-2003, 03:28 AM
Congratulations on getting your new camera! Hope you have lots of fun with it and shoot lots of great photos. :D I have your camera's ancestor :twisted:

yardmaster
11-02-2003, 05:06 AM
I use the Barbie "squeeze 'n fun" camera, mounted on the matching barbie tripod :lol: !! I also have the GI Joe "commando cam" that only comes out under the harshest weather conditions. I still turn out better photos than them so called "experts" that use them EOS 1Ds's with 600mm F4 lenses, and I save $16,000 in the process :P .

ATF1224
11-15-2003, 08:59 PM
I am using a very Junky Canon Powershot A100 1.2 Megapixel. I'm about to upgrade to a D30, and thoughts/suggestions about the D30?

bitburger
11-15-2003, 09:02 PM
I use the Barbie "squeeze 'n fun" camera, mounted on the matching barbie tripod :lol: !! I also have the GI Joe "commando cam" that only comes out under the harshest weather conditions. I still turn out better photos than them so called "experts" that use them EOS 1Ds's with 600mm F4 lenses, and I save $16,000 in the process :P .
Hehhe, you are one funny d00d :P

Well I'm still using my Powershot A70

Greets bitburger

bitburger
11-15-2003, 09:02 PM
I use the Barbie "squeeze 'n fun" camera, mounted on the matching barbie tripod :lol: !! I also have the GI Joe "commando cam" that only comes out under the harshest weather conditions. I still turn out better photos than them so called "experts" that use them EOS 1Ds's with 600mm F4 lenses, and I save $16,000 in the process :P .
Hehhe, you are one funny d00d :P

Well I'm still using my Powershot A70

Greets bitburger

iCe
11-15-2003, 09:26 PM
I am using a very Junky Canon Powershot A100 1.2 Megapixel. I'm about to upgrade to a D30, and thoughts/suggestions about the D30?

:shock: You take some great photos with a 1.2 MP camera! :)

ATF1224
11-16-2003, 08:28 PM
:D Thanks! It's very difficult to do much with this A100, it's only good for....well.... I don't know what it's good for, but I just bought my D30, hopefully I'll be able to get some really good photos now!

iCe
11-16-2003, 09:13 PM
:D Thanks! It's very difficult to do much with this A100, it's only good for....well.... I don't know what it's good for, but I just bought my D30, hopefully I'll be able to get some really good photos now!

Congrats on your purchase. :) Hope to see some great pictures. :D

ATF1224
11-21-2003, 08:33 PM
It Arrived today, and it will get a good testing tomorrow!

tbookout82
11-23-2003, 07:54 AM
I have not jumped to digital yet for anything serious. I do own a cheap Oregon Scientific 1.2 megapixel digital camera with very few features that I bought at Wal-Mart for about $20.00 on sale. I have not posted any of these pics though. I mostly use it for posting on ebay.
For serious work I have an Olympus OM1 with a 28mm wide angle, 50mm, and 70-210mm telephoto lens. I also have an Olympus OM-PC, both camera bodies are manual focus film cameras. I shoot some prints and some slides (both Ektachrome and Kodachrome &lt;which I really like for sunny days and steam>). I use an HP scanjet 3570c with transparent materials adaptor for scanning prints and slides.

Bob
11-23-2003, 11:05 PM
tbookout,
B&H PhotoVideo is an excellent place to buy photo equipment AND they have a lot of resources. Before you buy a digital camera answer this question for yourself: What do you want to do with your pictures? Do you want to make prints as well as displaying them here and other websites. If you want to make prints, what size? These are question that really don't come into play too much when we're talking film, because we shoot either print or slide. But with digital our choices are so much broader that we must decide before we lay out $$$ exactly what we want to do. Here is a link to B&H ... they are a great place to get stuff and they have a solid reputation. I've purchased things from them for more than 5 years now. Click on ...
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=getpage.jsp&A=getpage&Q=Product_Resources/resolution_chart.jsp
and you'll see what they have to say about the different resolutions.
Hope this helps!

tbookout82
11-24-2003, 12:30 AM
Thanks Bob I'll check that site out. I'm not really in the market right now to buy anything new, although I wouldn't mind something for the grab shots. I have also thought about purchasing a newer film camera with auto focus, but have not done that yet. Manual focus works well with shorter focal lengths and slow or still trains. Gets more difficult for long focal lengths and fast moving subjects. Thanks for the link!

K.J.
11-29-2003, 01:13 AM
At the moment I am using a mixture of the two.I have a jenoptik cheapo digital camera and have dug out my old rough and ready slr and lenses..(its a Zenit 12xp :oops: -used it mainly for outdoors work because my best camera at the time (canon EOS650)didn't like wet weather!!!).So until I get round to upgrading they will do..The 12XP has served me well for years... :) Couldn't bear to part with it.....Oh who am I kidding.. No one else would want it :lol:

Jonathan Guy
12-13-2003, 05:11 AM
My film equipment is now:
Canon Elan 7E
Canon 50mm
Canon 28-80
Canon 70-300

I'm hoping to have a Canon D10 by the first of the year and some faster glass like a 70-200 f2.8. :)

Most of my shots on railpictures.net are shot with a Nikon Coolpix3100 in HiRes mode with a 256 SanDisk Ultra CF. This little camera gives me 3.2mp and an optical 35-80 effective zoom. The camera is small and will fit in my back pocket so its easy to keep handy.

The 10D has joined the Elan 7e and the little Nikon has been sold. I've also added the f2.8 24-70 and f2.8 70-200 lens to the lineup. Why, oh why can't I find an in-expensive hobby?? :lol:

The little Coolpix was a great camera and I'd recommend it for anyone just starting in the digital arena, or in photography in general. However, I kept noticing how many shots I was loosing because of the 38-105mm zoom limitation of the camera.

nsrayman
12-21-2003, 03:16 AM
I use a Fuji Finepix 3800 , not a big money camera , but it gets the job done !

sample photo :
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=43217

Bryan Jones
12-23-2003, 07:12 AM
I use a Canon Elan 7E with the following lenses: Canon 50mm F1.8, Sigma 28-200mm F3.5-5.6, and a Canon 75-300mm F4-5.6. Still have a Canon 28-90mm F3.5-5.6 that came with the camera that I have never sold. I use Fuji Astia and Provia 400F films.
Digital camera is a Nikon Coolpix 995.
For scanning slides I use a Minolta DiMage Scan Elite II scanner which features the Digital ICE cubed package, which removes dust, scratches and can also restore faded colors and reduce grain.
Plans are to replace the Sigma 28-200 lens in January with the Canon 28-135IS F3.5-5.6 lens and to probably aquire the Canon 100-400L IS F4.5-5.6 when the tax check arrives (if I can wait that long). The summer may bring a digital body, but not until I have gotten all of the new glass I want first.

Bryan Jones


Well I've made a few changes since this original post. Equipment that I have added to the stable includes a Canon D30 DSLR, Canon 28-135 IS F3.5-5-6 lens, Canon 100-400L IS F4.5-5.6, and just this week a Tamron 28-75 F2.8 XR Di lens. Also added a Nikon Coolpix 3100 digicam to keep in the truck. I have sold my Nikon Coolpix 995. The Canon 28-90 F3.5-4.5 and Sigma 28-200 F3.5-5.6 are both sitting on the sidelines awaiting disposition.
Within the coming year of 2004, a Canon EOS 3 film body, new DSLR, Canon 70-200L F2.8 IS lens, and a 1.4x teleconvertor are on my short list of equipment that I am interesting in adding when and if funds permit. The new film body would most likely be top priority as I have really put some miles on the ol' Elan 7E which will be 3 years old in January.

Bryan Jones

Jonathan Guy
12-24-2003, 08:30 AM
Bryan,

How do you like the 28-135 IS for rail photography? I have one IS lens now and LOVE it. 28-135 just seems like the perfect "all around" lens focal length for general photography. I'd like to see Canon come out with the 24-70 in an IS version, but I'm sure that would be quite expensive!

Bryan Jones
12-24-2003, 10:14 AM
Bryan,

How do you like the 28-135 IS for rail photography? I have one IS lens now and LOVE it. 28-135 just seems like the perfect "all around" lens focal length for general photography. I'd like to see Canon come out with the 24-70 in an IS version, but I'm sure that would be quite expensive!

Jonathan,

I love the 28-135 IS. The only downside is that I have to always remember to not pan with it while the IS is kicked in because it will blur the image. Had this very unfortunate incident happen just after I got the lens on a trip to Rochelle,Illinois on a train that had one of the UP olypic SD70M's leading. It still makes me want to cry! I really like how it works on the digital camera as well with its 1.6x crop factor, its a killer combo. The Image Stabilization (IS) really shows its stuff on the 100-400IS. I continue to be nothing short of amazed at the 400mm shots that I take with it (640mm on the D30!), tack sharp and hand held! It is an expensive lens, but worth every penny!
One lens I have really become attached to is my new Tamron 28-75 F2.8 lens. I had been using my old 28-90mm lens on my D30 as the general purpose lens, but I had been wanting to get a faster short range zoom to add to the collection and the old 28-90 was just worn out and causing some problems so after a friend recently bought the same Tamron lens for his Nikon setup and had great results I decided to give it a shot. Picked it up for $320 or $330 at B&H, about 1/4 the price of a new Canon equivalent (24-70L F2.8) and the performance it just awesome, even wide open at F2.8. This is one third party lens that really performs and you can't beat the price!

Bryan Jones