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VRE Man
02-15-2005, 05:00 PM
Guys,

Is there a site or a good place to read up on Manual settings for Daytime (Sunny) Daytime (Cloudy) & Night shots? Manual for some reason scares me and I am always afraid I am going to *^%&( a shot if I do it manual.

I have a Sony F717 same as Chris K. unless he has changed cameras as of late?

Thanks,

JB

Chris Starnes
02-15-2005, 06:13 PM
I'm not familiar with the F717 (CK and I both are using the D60/20D now, btw) but manual exposure settings are always what I try to use. The lighting conditions and headlight glare/reflection are things that can cause auto exposure meters problems. Using manual gives you better control over the situation and makes it easier to make those last second changes before taking the shot.

brunswickrailfan
02-15-2005, 07:46 PM
I'm not familiar with the F717 (CK and I both are using the D60/20D now, btw) but manual exposure settings are always what I try to use. The lighting conditions and headlight glare/reflection are things that can cause auto exposure meters problems. Using manual gives you better control over the situation and makes it easier to make those last second changes before taking the shot.

Ditto all the way. Full manual was why I chose to go to a DSLR. My old Sony MV-CD1000 only allowed me Tv, Av, or P. Again, I dont know about the F717, but I couldn't adjust the ISO to allow for a higer shutter speed or depth of field at a whim like I can now when a cloud floats in or I think of something creative. If you ever want to get more creative (and flexible) with any type of photgraphy, full manual is the best way

Hope this helps :)

E.M. Bell
02-15-2005, 09:53 PM
Ditto here as well. As CTS said, the camera's light meter, no matter how fancy, will never replace the human eye and brain. Case in point..This afternoon I spent a couple of hours shooting a train witha new NS SD70M in primer. The primer is almost white, and reflects a LOT of light. The clouds where playng havoc with us at the start, and the camera kept telling me I was underexposing the frame...but the bright primer was overexposed by several stops. Using Manual helped me to correct the exposer and get what I wanted....

Sometimes, it does seem silly to buy a high priced camera that will do everything but the dishes, and then use it like a old manual body...but trust me, it works!!

VRE Man
02-23-2005, 05:12 PM
Thanks for the tips guys, I greatly appreciate them.


Jason

na4m
03-15-2005, 09:05 PM
B.E.C. or Basic Exposure Constant is also known as the Sunny 16 or The Sweet 16 of Photography. It's an exposure calculation system that relies on film speed (ISO) and an analysis of lighting conditions at the time of exposure.

It's valid for those times outdoors when the sun is in the sky and not for closed shade, indoors, or just at dawn or sunset.

Set shutter speed to reciprocal of film ISO speed (i.e. film ISO 100 set shutter speed of 1/125).

Aperture settings:
Bright Sun (sharp clear shadows) f/16
Hazy Sun (fuzzy indistinct shadows) f/11
Cloudy Sun (no shadows, brigth overcast sky) f/8
Cloudy Dull (no shadows, dull sky) f/5.6
Open Shade (subject in shadow, blue sky overhead) f/5.6
About to rain ( cloudy, dull or even dark) f/4

In camera light meters see everything as 18% grey so be careful metering bright or dark areas. Use something as close to a mid or neutral tone to meter off of - something like green or brown grass, or even the palm of your hand.