PDA

View Full Version : Canon Digital Rebel pictures


4kV
03-06-2005, 08:11 PM
Hi folks, I want to hear some opinions about taking shots with the digital rebel, and also the post photo processing. I've had it for about four months now, still haven't really taken pics to where I like them. I have three main issues, one being that they are not as crisp as many other photos on the site, one being the color saturation is pretty low, and third that I seem to overexpose almost everything by about one stop.

I generally shoot with a 80-200 that I had on my Canon Rebel 35 mm, or the kit lens that came with the Digital Rebel. I also use the lens that came with the 35 mm, whatever that is, it is not handy right now, so I forget. Sometimes I use a tripod, sometimes not, though that does not seem to affect the problem I am having. And then again, I may be out to lunch on this whole thing, I just don't think they look as good as they can.

I shoot manual, and have a heck of a time metering off something that might be middle gray, so usually I just get in the ballpark based on prior knowledge of lighting, take a shot, then adjust according to what the histogram says.

Afterward I use Photochop to resize from 3072 X 24whatever down to 1024 X 730ish, add some color saturation, sharpen a little, crop if need be, and play with the exposure a bit.

So, if anyone has any comments on the apparant fuzziness of the pictures or the lack of color, please chime in. I think the exposure problem can be attributed to my lack of good judgement when editing the photos, I probably make them too bright when they don't need to be.

I'd like to have this down by the time the spring foliage comes out, and the days get a little sunnier. Pictures after November of 2004 are the only ones relevant here.

Thanks for your help!

http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=1610

Pat

JButler
03-06-2005, 08:38 PM
I have a 20D and a Rebel Ti. I have found that unless you are using an L series lens, you get much better sharpness if you use f 8 or smaller aperture. Some mid-range lenses and the kit lenses that come with the cameras are not top of the line glass and perform better at smaller apertures. This requires that you shoot at a slower shutter speed or adjust the ISO equivalent to a higher ISO.

SD70MAC
03-06-2005, 10:31 PM
I just got my Digital Rebel last month and so far its an awesome camera! I shoot with my Sigma 28-105 MM lens and I never have any problems. I find the photos are a tad bit soft so I just resize to 1024x768 and then sharpen and they come out great! Heres a photo I took today. http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=96563 I took it on a cloudy day but I set the exposure just right to get a decent shot of the train. I use to shoot automatic all the time with my Rebel Ti and when I started to use manual on my digital camera after some help from the folks on here I saw a huge diffrence in my photos. Wade Massie told me for excellent lighting conditions he uses these settings Apeature of 1/500 of a sec at F/6.3 ......I have been using that setting now and my photos come out excellent. I feel like i might have drifted a little off topic in here. :) Hope you get working the way you want it.

4kV
03-06-2005, 10:39 PM
Thanks Ryan. What ISO are you using with f 6.3 at 1/500? Your cloudy day shot looks good. This whole thing may be my lenses, as was suggested above, and was suggested by someone off the board. A new lens has been on my wish list for a while, but I need something else first...... spare change to buy it.

Pat

4kV
03-06-2005, 10:46 PM
I have a 20D and a Rebel Ti. I have found that unless you are using an L series lens, you get much better sharpness if you use f 8 or smaller aperture. Some mid-range lenses and the kit lenses that come with the cameras are not top of the line glass and perform better at smaller apertures. This requires that you shoot at a slower shutter speed or adjust the ISO equivalent to a higher ISO.


That may be part of the trouble, too. In fact, on cloudy days, my photos seem to come out better. On sunny days, I shoot ISO 400 around f 11 or f 13 and 1/500 to 1/800. I like the depth of field with the higher f stops. I think I will try some shots based on your suggestion here, maybe closer to f 8 with a faster shutter speed.

Thanks for the suggestion, JButler.

SD70MAC
03-07-2005, 12:46 AM
Hi Pat,
I shoot with an ISO of 100 sometimes 200. Cloudy days I shoot with ISO 400.

Joe the Photog
03-07-2005, 02:44 PM
Pat,

There is a learning curve with the 300D that really only one thing will cure -- keep shooting. I know I was frustrated at first with some of the same issues you're having. The internal settings of the camera should solve some of that and for that, I'd suggest referring to your manual.

I've had my 300D (Digital Rebel) for about a year now and am getting to the point where I'm more than just satisfied with the results. However, it's a never ending process. I hope that a year from now I will think what I'm shooting is better than the stuff from now. Here are some recent examples --

[photoid=96114]
[photoid=96612]
[photoid=94998]

All three taken with the 300D and Canon Super Wide 10 to 22mm lens.


Joe H.

dsktc
03-07-2005, 11:04 PM
Pat, on sunny days, I always use ISO 100 with my 20D.
I would suggest using ISO 400 on cloudy days only.

Dave


That may be part of the trouble, too. In fact, on cloudy days, my photos seem to come out better. On sunny days, I shoot ISO 400 around f 11 or f 13 and 1/500 to 1/800. I like the depth of field with the higher f stops. I think I will try some shots based on your suggestion here, maybe closer to f 8 with a faster shutter speed.

Thanks for the suggestion, JButler.

brunswickrailfan
03-08-2005, 01:11 AM
Well, I did my learning on a Digital Rebel, though I have upgraded to a 10D for toughness.

http://www.railpictures.net/members/photostats.php?userid=1212&sort=date

All pictures from June 2004 to December 2004 were taken with a digital rebel in combo with the 18-55mm kit lens, a 75-300mm F/4-5.6 USM III, a 28-80 USM, or a 70-200mm F/4L. I highly reccommend this lens for its sharpness at all aperatures and price ($580...cheapest and sharpest zoom "L" lens).

I was able to convince Jim Johnston to get one, and Dave Kerr has the 2.8 version...both outstanding lenses!

As far as ISO is concerned, stick with ISO 100 and any aperature (depending on the desired effect). As I said above, the 70-200 F/4L is tack sharp at all aperatures, and there are no Chromatic Abberations!

ccaranna
03-08-2005, 01:21 AM
As a side note-- I would like to say that all these posts prove to be invaluable, since I just purchased this camera. Please keep them coming!!

Chuck

brunswickrailfan
03-08-2005, 05:13 AM
And most non-"L" lenses have their peak sharpness at F/8 and in the middle of the zoom range.

I wouldn't be bold to say all "L" glass is very sharp at all F/stops...