PDA

View Full Version : Most powerful Locomotive?


Beyond 1000
04-25-2005, 10:17 PM
Hi people. I'm brand new to this forum and a real novice among trains. I don't know where to find the answer to this simple question but.....Which is the most powerful locomotive operating today and how much power does it have? How does it compare to the old "Big Boy" type locomotives in size and power?

Also, is there a stats page in this forum about locomotives or does anyone know a statistic site anywhere in the net?

Thank you

ssw9662
04-25-2005, 11:27 PM
Here's a good site for diesel locomotive info.

http://www.geocities.com/guilford_350/

Guilford350
04-25-2005, 11:34 PM
In terms of horsepower, the SD90MAC-H and AC6000CW (6,000 hp each) are today's most powerful diesel locomotives. In terms of tractive effort, the SD90MAC-H is most powerful (200,000 lbs. starting, 170,000 lbs. continuous; vs. 180,000 starting, 166,000 lbs. cont. for the AC6000CW).

In comparison, the Big Boy produced about 6,300 horsepower at 35 Mph and about 135,000 lbs. of continuous tractive effort.

For diesel locomotive statistics, try my site- www.geocities.com/guilford_350

Beyond 1000
04-26-2005, 12:45 AM
Thanks a bunch guys.

I'll be checking the photos on the site for these monsters.

I'll also look at the website you guys posted.

Mat '64
04-26-2005, 06:00 AM
the most powerful Locomotive which I know is the German BR 103.

http://www.railfaneurope.net/pix/de/electric/103/rot-beige/103_180-199/103-15.jpg

it has a power of 7000 kW, that's more then 10000 hp.
Yup, that's a more powerful locomotive then HHP-8 :twisted: .

Cheers,
David.

ssw9662
04-26-2005, 03:10 PM
The thing is electric engines aren't "true" locomotives because they don't make their own power, they receive it from overhead catenary and use the electricity to turn the traction motors (Correct me if I'm wrong). Diesels and steam engines, however, make their own power.

If you counted turbines UP's "Big Blow", which was capable of 10,000HP is the most powerful locomotive.

Mat '64
04-26-2005, 06:07 PM
;) then you split, The locomotives in two types!

- Self Energie Generating Locomotives (diesels/steam)
- the so-called by you "recievers" (third-rail/Electric)

Beyond 1000 ask for "the most Powerful locomotive"
you gave the most powerful DIESEL locomotive.

By the way, you also contradict yourself, because, Diesel Locomotives needs Diesel, while Electric Locomotives needs Electric, and they recieve it by Overhead wires, while Diesel is being Tanked.. they use the Diesel.

See, everything needs energy. This means that we aren't "true" species, because we get our Energy through food, which gives us "fuel".

But everyone has it's right to his own opinion ;) .

Cheers,
David. (which just got sick by a stinking V-IRM (http://www.53a-pix.co.uk/picture/VIRM8242-DD-240701.jpg) who constanly produces this highly annoying noise:
http://www.freefilehosting.net/file.cfm?id=7EB9A05B-C785-C5A2-177A118FE51C6F99)

Edit: Typos

J
04-26-2005, 09:16 PM
;) then you split, The locomotives in two types!

- Self Energie Generating Locomotives (diesels/steam)
- the so-called by you "recievers" (third-rail/Electric)




Loco = "self." So you're saying an electric locomotive should be called an Electro-Motive?

Mat '64
04-26-2005, 09:32 PM
Loco = "self." So you're saying an electric locomotive should be called an Electro-Motive?

With other words, it's Bullshit that Electric Locomotives aren't "true" Locomotives, because then The Diesel won't be a "true" Locomotive as well.. the Same for Steam locomotives.

So if I understand.. a Car isn't a "true" Car because it doesn't generate Fuel inside it, it needs to be tanked..

it's the samething with electric locomotives, they have now Energy storage, so that's why they need overhead wires.. Electricity is in this Situation Their Fuel... The get Electricity tanked bij the Overhead wires, and constantly.

Cheers,
David.

Edit: typos

Richard klok
04-26-2005, 09:41 PM
Back to topic.....
I think the most powerfull loco's are the Old F-9's, from the US, Netherlands, I think the 16/17/1800 Series or the 1200..Germany, V200 or V180,

golden_spike
04-27-2005, 03:34 AM
I was just looking at Guilford's locomotive website and did some comparing of electric vs. deisel locomotives. I compared an AC6000cw (6000hp, 166,000 tractive effort) to an E60C-2 (6000hp, 75,000 tractive effort). According to some simple math calculations i did (it finally came in handy!), if the proportion of horsepower to tractive effort of the E60C-2 remained the same a 10,000 hp electric would produce only a 125,000 lb. tractive effort.

Seeing as the AC6000cw was produced quite recently and the E60C-2 was produced in the early '80s i compared the E60C-2 to the C30-7, which produced 3000 hp and 90,000 hp and was manufactured in the same time period.

My conclusions: 1. Guilford has a really awesome site with tons of information.
2. Although i dont really know a whole lot about this stuff i would put money down that an AC6000CW or an SD90MAC H II produces more tractive effort than does the BR 103, but let me know if i'd lose this bet.

How/why do the diesels produce so much more tractive effort than the electrics with less horsepower?

cmherndon
04-27-2005, 04:26 AM
How/why do the diesels produce so much more tractive effort than the electrics with less horsepower?

I may be wrong on this, but it may have to do with weight/gearing. A freight locomotive can weigh over 400,000 lbs. with low gearing to pull heavy loads. An electric passenger locomotive needs speed, so it'll be geared higher and will weigh less. Therefore, you'll get a higher top speed.

Think of your car for a second. Lower gears = less speed, more pulling power. Higher gears = higher speed, less pulling power.

Again, I may be wrong. If I am, feel free to add corrections.

Guilford350
04-27-2005, 05:39 PM
I may be wrong on this, but it may have to do with weight/gearing. A freight locomotive can weigh over 400,000 lbs. with low gearing to pull heavy loads. An electric passenger locomotive needs speed, so it'll be geared higher and will weigh less. Therefore, you'll get a higher top speed.

Think of your car for a second. Lower gears = less speed, more pulling power. Higher gears = higher speed, less pulling power.

Again, I may be wrong. If I am, feel free to add corrections.

Yes, a lot of it has to do with gearing, weight, adhesion, traction control systems, and track conditions.

J
04-27-2005, 08:50 PM
A good illustration would be to look back at engineering data for locomotives from 1950's. An F3, for example, was offered in several gear ratios depending on its intended service. I don't have the data in front of me but a railroad could order the same unit to perform helper and heavy haul service or high speed passenger service, depending on the gear ratio that was selected. The tractive effort and short time rating or continuous speed would be determined by this as well. Short time rating was the lowest speed that a unit could be operated in full throttle without building up damaging heat to the electrical equipment. A typical freight unit might be 8 or 10 mph while a passenger unit might be in the high teens.

Another factor would be the number of traction motors. There is not much difference under the hood between an SD9 and a GP9. However, by spreading the electrical energy through more motors, the SD ("Special Duty") would generate a higher tractive effort and lower continuous speed. On the other hand, the GP9 would accelerate a manageable train quicker. SP occasionally used two SD9's in passenger service in the 1970's. Numbers 4450 and 4451 were equipped with steam heat boilers and looked heroic but were real dogs in commute service.

Here's a shot of 4450
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=20718

Happily the unit remains today
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=14053

bnsf sammy
05-02-2005, 04:38 AM
yea but barely :LOL:

KawaiiImoto-e
05-30-2005, 10:10 PM
I know it's not the most powerfull electro-motive, but quite a beast.

The Re 6/6
Put in Service from 1972 till 1980, all units are still in use today (as in allmost june 2005, saw some yesterday).
Weight: 120 t
Power: 10600 PS / 7850 kW
Top Speed: 140 km/h

More info in German (http://homepage.sunrise.ch/homepage/kanada/Eisenbahnseiten/Re620/Re66.htm)

Tranlsated Facts:
- Acceleration with 800t in a angel of 6.5 o/oo up to 140 km/h
- Acceleration with 800t in a angel of 26 o/oo up to 80 km/h
auf 80 km/h
- Operation with 800t in a angel of 26 o/oo with 80 km/h

Untranslated:
Die Zugkraft am Rad beträgt bei halbabgenützten Radreifen maximal 394 kN und im Dauerbetrieb 234 kN

http://homepage.sunrise.ch/homepage/kanada/Eisenbahnseiten/Re620/11687.jpg


The most powerfull Electro-motive in Switzerland.

Baujahr: 1934 Leistung: 8’170 kW / 11’100 PS (The Pictured: 5'408 kW / 7'350 PS)
Gewicht: 240 t V. Max.: 100 km/h
Normlast: 770 t bei 70 km/h Länge: 34'000 mm

More info in German (http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bruno.laemmli/Lokomotiven/SBB-Ae_8-14.htm)

http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bruno.laemmli/images/Ae-8-14.jpg


hope I could contribute to the discussion

popolupo
06-02-2005, 06:10 PM
Russian electric locomotive VL85:
http://www.parovoz.com/newgallery/index.php?ID=2265&LNG=EN

http://www.parovoz.com/newgallery/index.php?ID=2262&LNG=EN

Built from 1983 till 1994
Power: 10000kW , so it gives more than 13000hp
Weight: 288 t
Max speed: 110km/h

KawaiiImoto-e
06-02-2005, 08:26 PM
If I look at these pictures, it's just like the Ae 8/14 'Landi Lok', two Locos merged together to get one powerfull.

The VL85 is such a loco too, so I think it'll be a good idea, if we would sort them out: Merged and single locos.

Or what kind of power would a merged Re 6/6 have?

popolupo
06-02-2005, 10:22 PM
I do not say that VL85 is the strongest loco, but is quite strong. If we take 2 merged Re6/6 it will be a monster . VL85 is double section loco but it is still 'one' loco. It was projected to be double units cause they need so strong loco.
Construction of VL85 is NOT like for example polish ET41:
http://railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=97964
which is properly two separate locos
(Two EU07's without one cabin)
but is one loco (similar to polish ET42 http://railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=100518)
it means that 'half' of this loco (only one unit) is unable to use

KawaiiImoto-e
10-09-2005, 08:16 PM
Yeah, but the Swiss National Railways mostly use one Re 6/6 with a Re 4/4 at the front of a fright train, sometimes a second Re 4/4 at the rear for services over the Gotthard.

That would be an additional power of 6320 PS / 4680 kW for each Re 4/4.

In Comparison, the Shinkansen Series 500 in Nozomi service (Fastest sheduled pasenger train service worldwide) has 18.24 MW for a 16 Car Unit (Each axle powered). But that's not a locomotive.

Daniel T
11-06-2005, 05:46 AM
Were I come from, the most powerful loco is the Clyde/Hitachi 3300/3400 Class electric locomotive at 3000 kilowatts or 4020hp of power (or 12000 kilowatts, 16080hp is what the whole consist gets) , these babys are set up as 2 locos leading and 2 locos in the middle of the consist. These sparks were made to haul coal fast and easily, and 4 of these going 80 kph while pulling 6000 ton is fairly good for an electric!
http://www.home.railscene.com/zanatta/loco/3400.jpg

rahul.v.rao
02-26-2008, 09:50 AM
Among Indian Diesel Locomotives The WDP4 is the most powerfull diesel locomotive at 4000Hp rated for 160 Kph but tested upto 180 kph with passinger rakes. it has a Bo1 1Bo wheel set.
Its twin the WDG4 has the same power pack but lower gearing and extra traction motors and a Co Co wheel set. I have observed it starting 60 goods wagons on a 1:150 gradient single handedly.

Among the Indian Electric locomotives The WAP-7 is rated at 6000 hp and top speed of 160 Kph and is currently used for most fast passinger trains.
The older WAP-5 though less powerfull 5450hp was faster with a top speed of 184 Kph but it can haul only shorter trains.

Tåg
02-26-2008, 11:17 PM
Another factor would be the number of traction motors. There is not much difference under the hood between an SD9 and a GP9. However, by spreading the electrical energy through more motors, the SD ("Special Duty") would generate a higher tractive effort and lower continuous speed. On the other hand, the GP9 would accelerate a manageable train quicker. SP occasionally used two SD9's in passenger service in the 1970's. Numbers 4450 and 4451 were equipped with steam heat boilers and looked heroic but were real dogs in commute service.


I don't know about the GP9, but those old SP SD9's were awsome when used on a local. I don't know why but they load up right now. In comparison SD90's take all week long to load up.

J
03-02-2008, 10:24 PM
I don't know about the GP9, but those old SP SD9's were awsome when used on a local. I don't know why but they load up right now. In comparison SD90's take all week long to load up.
Certainly don't disagree. The SD9's were excellent locomotives for switching and local service; dependable, smooth riding, etc. In commute service, however, they were a bit "leisurely."

ralfm1
04-23-2008, 01:47 PM
How about the electrics that LKAB in Sweden uses? They were delivered by Adtranz, now Bombardier. Each total locomotive has 10.8 megawatts per hour power. I believe that comes out to about 14400 hp/hour. Tractive effort is 1200 kn. Axle load is 30 metric tons.

MichaelJ
06-08-2008, 04:25 PM
I think the most powerful Narrow Gauge Locomotive is the QRNational Coal 3700 Class; 4080kW (5471HP) nominal traction horsepower and 500kN continuous tractive effort.

[photoid=196978]

dr2005
09-09-2008, 04:49 PM
The Romanian class 47/470 and 477 have 6600 kW (that's more than 8500 hp).

Class 47 is formed from modernized class 40 locomotives (5100 kW). The maximum speed is 120 km/h (74,5 mph) and the maximum weight of the train that can be pulled by this locomotive is 3600 tonnes.

The locomotives registered as class 477 are former class 41 locomotives (5100 kW). Theyr maximum speed is 160 km/h.

I forgot to tell that both class 40 and class 41 locomotives were built by Electroputere Craiova, under ASEA license. They were also exported in Bulgaria and Yugoslavia. Some were sold (second hand) in Hungary and Germany (1 unit to KEG).

Rui Nunes
09-09-2008, 07:59 PM
Our most powerful ones, are class CP 5600 with about 5600 kw of power ( 7600 + horsepower ).

Unfortunately their tractive effort isn't very high and they tend to slip a lot, nevertheless they are allowed to 1600 tonnes (alone) on some stretches of track, and up to 220 km\h on passenger trains, if the cars allow such speeds :p

http://www.hdd.pt//thumbs/1139023300.jpg (http://www.hdd.pt/imagens/1139023300.jpg)

tomt
10-23-2008, 01:01 AM
Russian electric locomotive VL85:
http://www.parovoz.com/newgallery/index.php?ID=2265&LNG=EN

http://www.parovoz.com/newgallery/index.php?ID=2262&LNG=EN



thanks for this link.


also from this site -


http://www.parovoz.com/gallery/RU75/20030101=p36-0041-chita.jpg


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

from this site -

http://www.parovoz.com/newgallery/show_translit.php

Х <= Kh Ж <= Zh Ц <= Ts Ч <= Ch
Щ <= Shch Щ <= Sch Ш <= Sh Ю <= Yu
Я <= Ya ж <= zh х <= kh ц <= ts
ч <= ch щ <= shch щ <= sch ш <= sh
ю <= yu я <= ya А <= A Б <= B
В <= V Г <= G Д <= D Е <= E
З <= Z И <= I Й <= J К <= K
Л <= L М <= M Н <= N О <= O
П <= P Р <= R С <= S Т <= T
У <= U Ф <= F Х <= H Ц <= C
Ы <= Y а <= a б <= b в <= v
г <= g д <= d е <= e з <= z
и <= i й <= j к <= k л <= l
м <= m н <= n о <= o п <= p
р <= r с <= s т <= t у <= u
ф <= f х <= h ц <= c ы <= y
ь <= '