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Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
06-07-2005, 11:15 PM
I have a Fuji Finepix S7000, which I usually use in 3MP or 6 MP...and I am just recently playing around with shooting in RAW in hopes to get into a magazine (now that they are starting to accept digital images). Because Photo Shop Elements cannot open a RAW (RAF) file, I have been forced to use a different program. I turned to the program they sent with the camera, Fuji FinePixViewer. It is good in the sense that I can actually open and view the images in RAW at their full size of 4048X3040, but when I try to resave in JPEG or TIFF format it resaves as 1280X960 not giving much room to edit.

Does anyone know of a better program to use to open RAW files that is free to download?

Thanks for your help,
Andrew Blaszczyk

espee-fan
06-08-2005, 04:26 AM
RawShooter essentials @ www.pixmantec.com

Nice program, lots of sliders to make adjustments to your photo. Make sure you read the instructions, it helps explain the sliders and the importance of using them in the proper order.

A cool feature I like a lot is the snapshots. Make some adjustments and take a snapshot. Then make some more adjustments and you can compare the photo to a previous snapshot. The program also saves your 'setting' for individual photos in a seperate file, the originals are never modified.

You can save your recipe's (slider adjusments) to apply them to many photos (batch process). You can save photos as jpeg's or tiff's. The tiff's can be 8 or 16 bit just in case you want to bring them into Photoshop or some other program for further editing before converting to jpeg.

Dennis

railfanzone
06-08-2005, 02:51 PM
I also use RSE, in addition to Photoshop Elements 3 and Canon Digital Photo Professional (I shoot a Canon 20D). Elements should open your RAWs - you might need to download the latest Adobe Camera RAW plugin - the CS2 version works fine with Elements 3. Of course, if you're using Elements 2, then you're SOL.

Anyways, RSE is great at reducing noise in the photos, but I've found that it leaves the colors somewhat flat for my taste, especially in brighter scenes - I get better results from Canon's Digital Photo Pro for those photos. But ones where I need to do some compensation and noise reduction, you can't beat it...especially for the price - $0!

RJSorensen
06-09-2005, 12:57 AM
The work flow of Raw was hard at first . . . but then I guess you get used to it. I have had some flat color as well. I am not sure that I will stay or go back to .jpg's. Are you guys Hooked on the new Raw format?

railfanzone
06-09-2005, 01:45 AM
I only shoot RAW now. Why throw away half of the data in an image by only shooting JPEG? Plus the workflow isn't that complex once you're used to it. I usually spend less than a few seconds on each RAW before converting to TIFF or PSD. Last step is going to JPEG if I'm going to post it on the web, otherwise if it's going to a magazine, it stays TIFF.

Think of it this way - RAW is the undeveloped film, and JPEG is the final processed and corrected print. The beautiful thing about shooting RAW is you can "develop" the film any number of times, changing the parameters each time. Can't do that with a slide or negative - the moment the developer hits the film, it's set in stone.

I never throw away my negatives, and I never delete my RAWs (unless they're totally out of focus).

-Tom

busyEMT
06-09-2005, 01:52 AM
It was a pain at first... mainly the post production. I really only shot .jpg for # of shots per card; but as I now use a 1G and a 512M card, I nearly fill them both every time I go out.

I simply use the Canon RAW converter and then open the TIFF in PS6. I may try the program listed above.

KCSRailfan119
07-18-2005, 12:48 AM
Andrew,

You should be able to open the RAW/RAF format in PSE. Are you using Version 2 or 3? I know that PSE 3 can open the Canon RAW and any other RAW format. If yours will not, all you should have to do is download the needed update from Adobe. If not, IfranView should convert it for you.