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canadianrailfan
09-26-2005, 01:25 AM
What does CSX stand for? Ive never been able to find out, accually I really haven't looked that much. :-D

cmherndon
09-26-2005, 01:38 AM
Chessie-Seaboard. There are many variations as to what the "X" means, but from what I have read, it means "Together we are many times more". There are also many vulgar names associated with it.

Ru1056
09-26-2005, 02:22 AM
I have heard the "X" means everything else.

Well gotta leave this thread, as the temptation to misbehave is too great.

bnsf sammy
09-26-2005, 02:58 AM
doesn't the X stand for like a private railroad or something?

cmherndon
09-26-2005, 03:16 AM
doesn't the X stand for like a private railroad or something?

Only when a reporting mark ends in X, and even then it's usually not a railroad but rather a leasing company or private car owner of some sort.

For the record, CSX's reporting marks are CSXT.

NicTrain35
09-26-2005, 03:42 AM
I've heard from some people that the X means crossing.

Ru1056
09-26-2005, 04:07 AM
I've heard from some people that the X means crossing.

In CSX, or in general?

bnsf sammy
09-26-2005, 04:13 AM
X means crossing.
You mean a railroad crossing? I think X means like a tunnel/bridge/crossing, that is suggested to blow the horn, but isn't necessary. I think a W means it is mandatory to blow the horn.

Randy Jay
09-26-2005, 01:09 PM
Around here everybody calls it chicken sh** express.

sdfan
09-26-2005, 01:52 PM
Caleb says "it's usually not a railroad".

I'll take his definition on this one.

BM

hoydie17
09-26-2005, 05:10 PM
On the CSX website, there used to be an FAQ section, and it was asked what "CSX" stood for.

The answer was C = CHESSIE S = SEABOARD X= All the others.

"All the Others" can be interpreted as all the other subsidiary companies that Chessie and Seaboard brought with them in the merger, and any companies that the absorbed after the merger, such as Conrail or RF&P. The "other" companies may not necessarily be railroad related either.

Sean

LAHDPOP
09-26-2005, 05:19 PM
From an article in Trains about the topic:
TRAINS ARTICLE (http://www.trains.com/Content/Dynamic/Articles/000/000/002/997majiu.asp)

NicTrain35
09-26-2005, 10:52 PM
In CSX, or in general?
In CSX from what I hear from some of my friends. Kind of makes sense since the X is a crossing. I could be wrong though.

fuente1
09-26-2005, 11:27 PM
CSX= ChemicalSpillXpress 8-)

bgregg
09-27-2005, 03:42 AM
CSX Corporation officially began on Nov. 1,1980. It was formed from Seaboard Coast Line Industries and Chessie System. The whole article(s) about the forming of this corporation is in "Family Lines" employee magazines from around 1977 up to the merger in 1980.

Brian G.

SD70MACMAN
10-13-2005, 07:08 AM
Ive also heard Chessie Seaboard Express

Isnt it wonderful having an acrynom that means nothing! Like the "new" BNSF!

David Telesha
10-13-2005, 07:28 PM
.................

Ween
10-14-2005, 01:08 AM
X is used as a filler for reporting mark space to be so many characters. CST is too short so CSXT. EMD is too short so its EMDX. MET is too short so METX.<!-- / message --><!-- sig -->
NPR= Northern Plains Railroad
HE= Hollis & Eastern
UP= Union Pacific
NS= Norfolk Southern

Should I go on?

David Telesha
10-14-2005, 02:07 AM
....................

LAHDPOP
10-14-2005, 03:26 AM
Not unless you want to but you aren't making a point you think you are.

After all I never ever said it *had* to be there - just thats what its used for.

Obviously its not there to give the name a nice "ring" to it..

PW = Providence & Worcester - Stock symbol PWX
NH = New Haven (no X here)
CEFX = Whatever

Yada yada yada - like I said the X is also used as a place filler but CSX used it as that and a "Xcetera" for other roads as I said..

Dude, you don't know what you're talking about. First of all, a company's stock symbol has nothing to do with it's RR Reporting Marks. If a reporting mark ends with an "X," then it's a non-railroad entity. For instance, EMDX is a locomotive manufacturer, not a RR; CEFX is a leaser, not a RR; GATX is a tank car builder, not a RR; TTX is a trailer flat maker, not a RR. UP, CSXT, NS, etc are Railroads.

Read the article I linked to from Trains Magazine. In CSX, the "X" was in fact a filler, until they could decide what the other letter would be. Then eventually, "CSX" existed on so many legal documents, briefs, and reports, that it in fact stuck because they had gotten used to it, and decided that the "X" would represent "so much more," and the multiplication symbol; to denote CSXT's non-RR holdings, and the fact that the union of Chessie and Seaboard was more than the sum of its parts.

So in short, Chris was making the exact point he thought he was.

David Telesha
10-14-2005, 05:48 PM
..........................

LAHDPOP
10-14-2005, 06:20 PM
So I did a sloppy job explaining it.

To say the very least.

ME 488
10-14-2005, 09:35 PM
If you see a car that says X after the reporting mark, unless it's CSX, the X means that it is privatly owned.

4kV
10-14-2005, 10:42 PM
If you see a car that says X after the reporting mark, unless it's CSX, the X means that it is privatly owned.

You will not see a car with CSX on it, it will say CSXT, as mentioned above.

ccaranna
10-14-2005, 11:39 PM
I'm pretty sure that the X in CSX stands for "Expanded".

According to Chessie's Road, by Charles W. Turner, Thomas W. Dixon, Jr., and Eugene L. Huddleston, authors-

Page 213 states-

"When the idea of the Chessie/Seaboard merger arose, a holding company for the assets of the two roads was formed and called "CSX", which stood for Chessie and Seaboard Expanded. The implication was that the two together equaled much more than the sum of its parts."

So, I guess C+S equals a lot less than C times S. Also, in retrospect, CSX sounds better than CXS (see excess) or SXC (sexy?). :lol:

EDIT- Why is this in the "International Railroad Discussion" section? :confused:

Frederick
10-14-2005, 11:53 PM
How about CSL intermodal? What does the 'L' represent?

ccaranna
10-15-2005, 12:00 AM
How about CSL intermodal? What does the 'L' represent?

Got me there. Maybe it was going to be "CSI", but it sounds too much like a TV show? I have no idea. :o

LAHDPOP
10-15-2005, 01:15 AM
How about CSL intermodal? What does the 'L' represent?

I assume "Logistics."

"CSX set up the CSL Intermodal subsidiary in the 1980's to run their logistics management business. Since this business had a coast to coast reach, the name CSL was chosen so customers wouldn't think the service ended where CSX track did (in fact their headquarters was on a major highway and not a rail line). After a few years, it was decided that the distinction didn't matter and the CSL name was retired in favor of CSX Intermodal."

kfleeman
10-15-2005, 01:24 AM
I have always heard and read that CSX stands for Chessie Seaboard Xpansion.

Ru1056
10-15-2005, 01:42 AM
So, I guess C+S equals a lot less than C times S. Also, in retrospect, CSX sounds better than CXS (see excess) or SXC (sexy?).

Did I just wonder into a math class?

bgregg
10-15-2005, 02:05 AM
CSX Corporation officially began on Nov. 1,1980. It was formed from Seaboard Coast Line Industries and Chessie System. The whole article(s) about the forming of this corporation is in "Family Lines" employee magazines from around 1977 up to the merger in 1980.

Brian G.

I put this reply above in here because it is in the "actual" employee magazine from that time period, when CSX came up when talking about the two above merging together. CSX was used in all legal terms referring to all talks when referring to the merger. They went ahead and stayed with the name CSX because of how much they referred to it and the name became known throughout the industry. The original CSX logo they came up with was pretty shabby. The one they have been using since taking the "Transportation" off the name looks a whole lot better.

The "X" does mean the two companies forming together like ccaranna said.

Brian G.

Ween
10-15-2005, 02:33 AM
So in short, Chris was making the exact point he thought he was.

Yeah, that's the way it usually is with me...get used to it!! ;)

How could you not come to the conclusion that the point being made was that there had to be four letters in the reporting mark after reading the following:

X is used as a filler for reporting mark space to be so many characters. CST is too short so CSXT. EMD is too short so its EMDX. MET is too short so METX.

E3429
10-15-2005, 06:28 AM
Here's the pamphlet they put out in the early 80's explaining CSX. Yeah, that first logo was NOT good at all.

I also recall an article in Trains magazine back then where the company president was quoted as saying "CSX will never appear on a freight car or locomotive." We see how long that lasted!

E

jb17kx
10-16-2005, 02:37 AM
Do we then assume that the Z and U at the end of some reporting mars are also space fillers? Railroads are prohibited from having reporting marks that end in U, X or Z because these suffixs denote, respectively; shipping containers, private property, and trailers.
For example BNAU, RWTU, RSSU are reporting marks, owned by companies including the RR, that are placed on shipping containers.
Marks like BCTZ or BMAZ are placed on trailers for TOFC service

These letters may be used as fillers at the start: eg ZKCC, because the AAR mandates that all reporting marks, except for those used on railroad property, must be four letters. Thus, on Norfolk Southern hoppers, etc, you will see the reporting mark NS. However, with tankers owned by the General American Marks Company, you will see the mark GATX, because the cars are private property.
Thus CSX uses the mark CSXT because they can't use the mark CSX.

cmherndon
10-16-2005, 04:06 AM
Do we then assume that the Z and U at the end of some reporting mars are also space fillers?

You'll usually see these on intermodal trailers and containers. If I'm not mistaken, Z and U are reserved those purposes.

Examples:

JBHZ - J.B. Hunt trailer
UPSZ - UPS trailer
TCSZ - Triple Crown Services trailer
JBHU - J.B. Hunt container
and so on...

ssw9662
10-16-2005, 04:21 AM
You'll usually see these on intermodal trailers and containers. If I'm not mistaken, Z and U are reserved those purposes.


Yeah, U is used for containers, both railroad and not railroad.

Z is used for trailers, but non all trailers have them. For example, US Xpress and Schneider do not have reporting marks on their trailers. I think that the Z is for trucking companies that are AAR registered, correct me if I'm wrong.

Also, chassis used for transporting containers by road have Z at the end of their reporting marks.

CEFX = Whatever

Oh and for the record, CEFX is Capital Equipment Financing, and we already talked about what the X stood for.

canadianrailfan
10-18-2005, 05:07 AM
Why is this in the "International Railroad Discussion" section? :confused:

I put it here because i have no idea wear CSX runs in the US, and international does include the US.

4kV
10-18-2005, 05:12 AM
For example, US Xpress and Schneider do not have reporting marks on their trailers. I think that the Z is for trucking companies that are AAR registered, correct me if I'm wrong.

You are correct, they do not have the reporting marks on the trailers. But.... if you look at a train list with Schneider trailers on the train, they are listed as SNLZ. Werner is WERZ, and there are many others.

AlcoProducts
11-14-2005, 02:48 AM
reporting marks that end in ... Z because th[is] suffix denote... trailers.
There are exceptions to the rule with "Z":
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=88614

oltmannd
11-15-2005, 05:44 PM
There are exceptions to the rule with "Z":
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=88614

Not quite. CYDZ 258 is not registered in UMLER - so it doesn't count!

freight48
03-29-2006, 02:20 AM
Freight! Freight!