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dodi4200
12-19-2005, 02:14 PM
hi all
im using digital camera BENQ DC E300 and i noticed from alot of railfans that when i wanna to take anight shot i should have along exposure and when i looked into the exposure options in my camera i found that the range of exposure from -1.5 to +1.5 so how can i use it to take anice night shot and also some of my friends told me that the more the train static the more the pic is clear is that true?
any help will apperciated.

ericb
12-19-2005, 03:00 PM
hi all
im using digital camera BENQ DC E300 and i noticed from alot of railfans that when i wanna to take anight shot i should have along exposure and when i looked into the exposure options in my camera i found that the range of exposure from -1.5 to +1.5 so how can i use it to take anice night shot and also some of my friends told me that the more the train static the more the pic is clear is that true?
any help will apperciated.

For night shots you will need a camera that will allow you to manually set the shutter speed as well as a sturdy tripod. The exposure range of -1.5 to +1.5 you described is not used for this type of photo. That is called exposure compensation and is used to overexpose or underexpose a photo as needed.


Also for night shots, the train and camera should both be absolutely motionless. There is a way to photograph a moving train at night but it involves expensive lighting equipment and the temporary blinding of the train crew with a burst of light.

Joe the Photog
12-19-2005, 03:43 PM
Eric wrote --

"Also for night shots, the train and camera should both be absolutely motionless."

Duh on the camera being motionaless, but who says the train can't be blurring through the shot?

[photoid=95063]
[photoid=81899]

Which is not to say stopped trains don't make cool shots

[photoid=122049]
[photoid=93742]

but to say trains must be stopped is, well, your opinion, not a hard and fast rule.


Joe H.

ericb
12-19-2005, 04:03 PM
Duh, Of course it's my opinion...

Instead of arguing with me about what is my opinion and what is not, how about helping Dodi with his original question.

A better response would be: "Eric, I disagree with your answer to dodi's question...." and then explain how you would do it differently.

Thanks

Joe the Photog
12-19-2005, 07:35 PM
Dodi;

I don't know much about your camera, but it may not be up to the task of taking night shots if you can't control the shutter and aperture yourself. Shooting in full manual on a tripod is a must, though technically it would be possible to sit the camera down on a stationary object. If your camera has a time release or you have a cable/remote for it, this will help also.

With all of that said, I've used a small point and shoot camera on a tripod with no manual controls and have got decent results, though I doubt any of them would meet RP criteria. (None ofthem were rail-related for starters.)


Joe

dodi4200
12-20-2005, 10:52 AM
so i can say that the options of my camera canot help me to take night shots.so what about if i used the flash will that work?

VirginiaSouthern
12-20-2005, 11:30 AM
Most often (if ever), a camera flash is not going to do you any good in a night shot. It will only put light on a specific spot of the loco (if at all, depending on how far back you are) and leave the rest dark. Additionally, if there are any reflective items, the flash will light them only, again leaving the rest of the picture dark. As Joe has mentioned the best way to do it is with manual settings on a tripod. You need to be able to set a long exposure time. If you do not have this ability, I'd hold off on night shots until you can purchase one.

Just my .02

dodi4200
12-20-2005, 11:58 AM
so you mean by long time exposure that make the power of the camera on along time so there is alot of light can enter to the lens of the camera?

VirginiaSouthern
12-20-2005, 12:06 PM
so you mean by long time exposure that make the power of the camera on along time so there is alot of light can enter to the lens of the camera?

Exactly.

If your hands are anything like mine, you're best to get a remote shutter button too. My hands tend to shake alot and I'll end up vibrating the camera a little bit while depressing the shutter button.

dodi4200
12-20-2005, 01:16 PM
ok so i can catch anight shots by my camera by this small equation
long time exposure+tripod= decent night shot
so can the remote button be used on my camera?
and also from your piont of view what will be the best level for the exposure between -1.5 and +1.5 ?

StL-rail
12-20-2005, 01:46 PM
Mohamed,
do the railroads by you put reflective tape of any kind on their locomotives? If not, then a flash should work just fine. Reflective surfaces of any kind are your enemy when using a flash, though.

cmherndon
12-20-2005, 02:04 PM
so can the remote button be used on my camera?

You might want to check the manual for that. If you can't use a remote, you can use the self timer on your camera. I learned this trick earlier this year, but it can be very tricky when the train is moving. The timing has to be perfect.

dodi4200
12-20-2005, 03:04 PM
You might want to check the manual for that. If you can't use a remote, you can use the self timer on your camera. I learned this trick earlier this year, but it can be very tricky when the train is moving. The timing has to be perfect.
the self timer in my camera is 10seconds also i will look at the manual of the camera.but at first i will try to take apic without moving my hands may be it work.

JBCagle7073
12-31-2005, 05:20 AM
If you are going to use the self timer on your camera you can also use a burst setting if your camera has that so that you have a little room for error on the timing.

The burst mode takes several pictures in a short time span, so if your first picture in the 10 second delay is too soon there are several more waiting to be taken behind it. You may have 3 of the 4 pictures be throw aways, but that's the beauty of digital!

Good Luck in your attempts

dodi4200
12-31-2005, 01:53 PM
i think that i donot have the burst mode in my camera as its not ahigh option camera.so about to put the camera in self timer mode and put it above any static object so it will caught the pic without any movement.

mr_mathyou
01-14-2006, 12:49 AM
you can give night shots a try with out a tripod, but honesly a tripod is a must for night shots. Placing the camera on a solid object (say a bench at the train staion) will keep it still but its very hard to aim and actualy ge what you want from it. for many night shots you will need a long shutter speed to get enough light onto the film or CCD.

this photo here: http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=109179 that i took was shot with a 1 second exposure from a tripod. I got lucky on that one b/c there was a lot of light around. many of the night shots i've been doing lately are at 15 or 30 seconds. they end up really cool, but need a tripod.

So my advice would be to take a look at your user manual and see if your camera has a manual [M] mode or shutter priority [S] mode on it. if so use one of these and see what the longest you can take a photo for. most cameras have what is called bulb [B] mode in the range of shutter speeds. this means that the sutter stays open as long as the shutter releas botton is pressed. this can be the best way to get a long shot. if your camera dosent have anything like that its honesly going to be pritty hard to get a good shot since most cameras will only go down to 1 second on automatic mode.

so go read up on your camera and then then what ever it can do take it out and have a little fun. you cant learn if you dont use it. and if you like night shots get a tripod =D
~matt

dodi4200
01-14-2006, 10:05 AM
thanks matt for the replay.
i will look again in the manual of my camera.also i agree with the idea of putting the camera in asolid object not atripod.
but at first i will look to the place that i will catch apic from it and see the light in it which will help me alot in catching night shots.
nice shot matt and keep up the great work ;)