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View Full Version : UV Filters- use or not to use ?????


S.C. Vermillion
10-30-2003, 07:43 PM
Does anyone have one. If so what are the gains and the losses. I hear that they can cause problems with ghosting. Anyone ever have this problem. I was thinking about getting one to keep dust off my zoom lense as it is alot easier to clean a UV filter than a zoom lense.

Bob
10-30-2003, 11:11 PM
I've not used a UV filter with my digital stuff, but with film cameras I'd keep one on each lens, if only for protection. Cheap insurance!!! A polarizer, on the other hand, is, in my humble opinion, a MUST HAVE, for CCD or film. The circular polarizers are the ones for auto-focus lenses.

mojo628
10-31-2003, 01:05 AM
I used a UV filter with my film camera and didn't seem to have a problem. Once I changed to digital it caused inverted ghost images of lights. Especially train lights.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=35420

Not good. I removed the filter and removed the problem source. :)

E.M. Bell
10-31-2003, 02:14 AM
I have tries all manner of filters with mixed results, but as I rule I wont any more. I had a lot of trouble with ghosting of lights, sun flares ect with the filters. This seems to be more notiicable when using a tele (not that I would EVER use a tele :lol:)

I have found that what little changes the polarizer makes, I Can also make in photoshop when I process the image, so its really no big deal. There are a few speical effects filters (sunset, star ect) that can add a little to a shot, but only in very rare ocassions. I have a pocket on the camera bag full of Coken filters that I Can make somebody a really good deal on!!

Bob
10-31-2003, 04:32 AM
I have noticed one thing that REALLY applies to filters ... you definitely get what you pay for. If you opt for cheap you'll more than likely get more mares, ghosts, etc. than if you opt for multi-coated filters.

ddavies
11-11-2003, 02:45 PM
As a general rule, a skylight filter is a good idea to protect the front lens elements.

As a practical consideration for rail photographers, especially shooting tele shots of an oncoming train, take all filters off. The headlights and ditch lights are just going to produce ghost images, no matter what brand you are using. (I removed the Nikon filters from my Nikon lenses about two years ago.) :wink: