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NSFan14
06-14-2006, 11:19 PM
Freight Trains Collide in California

MADERA, Calif. (June 14) - Two freight trains collided head-on Wednesday, injuring five train workers, some of whom jumped off moments before the crash.




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"It's a miracle they survived," said Erica Stuart, a spokeswoman for the Madera County Sheriff's Department. "It's a big, mangled mess."

One of the BNSF Railway workers was hospitalized in serious condition, said spokeswoman Lena Kent. The others were treated for minor injuries and released.


"It's a miracle they survived."
-Erica Stuart

One of the trains was carrying cement from San Bernardino to the Bay Area and the other was taking pentane, a methane-based liquid fuel, from Richmond to Barstow. Some diesel leaked from an engine, but no cargo spilled, Kent said.

A hazardous material team was called as a precaution and the tracks were closed for at least the day in Madera, about 150 miles southeast of San Francisco. Amtrak, which uses the same rails, had to bus passengers.

"It's too soon to determine how this happened but we are doing a full investigation," Kent said. Company investigators didn't know whether the trains hit each other at full speed or how many workers jumped. Some stayed aboard during the collision.


6/14/2006 14:05 EDT

Warren
06-15-2006, 12:18 AM
More on this with a small photo. http://www.fresnobee.com/home/local/story/12317669p-13050371c.html

Gordon Graham
06-15-2006, 01:53 PM
Oh no !

Any information of the locomotives ?

NSFan14
06-15-2006, 11:39 PM
Im Not For Sure Sir I Just Got This Off Of Internet So Thats All I Got

jaanfo
06-16-2006, 10:24 AM
Coworkers have a number of faxed picutured from the scene posted on a bulletin board in the break room at SAN, I was looking through it and saw at least three of the numbers, but didn't memorize them. will tell you tomorrow if I remember to get them.

mute
02-13-2007, 05:44 AM
the eastbound ran past a red block and hit the westbound at the frog of the east switch at kismet siding. the westbound engine was equipped with a camera and the video is shocking. kind of a railroader's worst nightmare. the sound is the worst part of it.

Studogg120
02-14-2007, 12:44 AM
the eastbound ran past a red block and hit the westbound at the frog of the east switch at kismet siding. the westbound engine was equipped with a camera and the video is shocking. kind of a railroader's worst nightmare. the sound is the worst part of it.

Where did you see the video?

mute
02-14-2007, 03:50 AM
Where did you see the video?

i work for bnsf so i was allowed to watch it. i wish i could get a hold of it somehow but i dont think theyre going to let it leak out. looks kinda bad for business i suppose.

Studogg120
02-15-2007, 03:14 AM
Oh. Guess that would be real bad.

Tåg
02-24-2007, 03:50 AM
the eastbound ran past a red block and hit the westbound at the frog of the east switch at kismet siding. the westbound engine was equipped with a camera and the video is shocking. kind of a railroader's worst nightmare. the sound is the worst part of it.

Sounds like somebody fell asleep.

StL-rail
02-24-2007, 05:26 AM
Sounds like somebody fell asleep.

I guess they didn't read the part of the napping policy that says the train must be stopped. ;)

Tåg
02-25-2007, 01:15 AM
I guess they didn't read the part of the napping policy that says the train must be stopped. ;)

Rule 1.11.1

mute
02-25-2007, 04:51 AM
Sounds like somebody fell asleep.

Yeah, the funny thing is that the engineer blew the whistle for two crossings about a mile back from the red block. you can actually see him jumping off the engine in the video just a few seconds before the collision.

Tåg
02-25-2007, 10:00 PM
Yeah, the funny thing is that the engineer blew the whistle for two crossings about a mile back from the red block. you can actually see him jumping off the engine in the video just a few seconds before the collision.

It is real easy to just zone out, especially if you are running over 65 or at restricted speed.

mute
02-25-2007, 11:21 PM
It is real easy to just zone out, especially if you are running over 65 or at restricted speed.

they were 55mph, but the reality is that the crew wasnt known for their... ah... "attentiveness"

Tåg
02-26-2007, 02:54 AM
When you are going fast the engine starts rocking back and forth and it is really easy to fade in and out even early in your trip.

mute
02-26-2007, 09:27 AM
When you are going fast the engine starts rocking back and forth and it is really easy to fade in and out even early in your trip.

Yes I know that feeling, and when it happens I get up and move around or eat and drink something. Anything to stay awake. These guys werent exactly model railroaders.

alan-crotty
02-26-2007, 09:27 AM
Don't you have a vigilance device on US locos?

Alan

mute
02-26-2007, 09:32 AM
Don't you have a vigilance device on US locos?

Alan

Yes most of them. that is why this incident is so stupid. they were awake almost until the very end because the engineer was still blowing the whistle, but he must have dozed off just long enough to get past the point of no return.

Tåg
02-26-2007, 05:49 PM
The vigilance device activates in 50 seconds if there is no movement on the controls after 10 seconds the train goes into supression and comes to a stop.

Chances are they didnt fall asleep but rather zoned out.

medic_pilot
03-25-2007, 06:19 AM
So, this jumping off of a moving locomotive thing. Is that accepted practice?

I mean, I read about it periodically where some unfortunate railroader leaps from his train just before impact.

Out of curiosity, are your chances better outside or inside of a several hundred ton freight train as it is crashing?

mute
03-25-2007, 12:26 PM
So, this jumping off of a moving locomotive thing. Is that accepted practice?

I mean, I read about it periodically where some unfortunate railroader leaps from his train just before impact.

Out of curiosity, are your chances better outside or inside of a several hundred ton freight train as it is crashing?

Never was trained one way or the other but I believe your chances are better staying on. Hard to say what the best course of action is but you can die either way, just kind of a roll of the dice.

Traisessive
03-26-2007, 03:55 AM
here is the scary thing. a lot of engineers hit the alerter without opening their eyes or even have a tendancy to do it on there sleep

Burner50
03-27-2007, 07:23 AM
They taught us how to get off safely while moving even tho its against the rules....

They want us to know how to do it safely in case you ever have to...

Saw some pics at the last union meeting from a wreck back in 1999.... I think i'll jump if i get the chance. There wasnt much left of the cab and the engineer died...

StL-rail
03-28-2007, 09:29 PM
If you can't jump, get on the floor. Quick.

mute
08-11-2007, 08:48 AM
Found a link to the video.

http://www.tubearoo.com/articles/86206/Trains_Collide_Head_On.html

quiksmith10
08-11-2007, 04:08 PM
Talk about feeling helpless there. Due to the situation, it looks like they only had a few seconds to react. You can see one of the workers on the other train jump about 2 seconds before impact. Wow, incredible video. Thanks for sharing that.

mute
08-11-2007, 05:49 PM
Luckily all survived this crash. The crew on the camera equipped train stayed on and suffered major injuries, but certain death awaited them had they jumped as their train ended up piling up all around their projected landing point. Their train was traveling 38 mph.

The crew of the other train all jumped and suffered relatively minor injuries, luckily their train didn't derail on top of them. The speed of their train was around 25 mph if I recall.

Either way this video is a railroader's worst nightmare.