PDA

View Full Version : Multiple Exposures in One Shot


ottergoose
09-14-2006, 04:16 AM
Having seen this shot:

[photoid=157940]

And reading the description and seeing that the neon sign had been turned on and off, I started thinking about some of the neon signage around my neck of the woods, and how I can't turn it on and off at will...

If two exposures were done, one short to get the neon, and another longer, to get the train and so fourth, were taken from the same spot, could they be put together in Photoshop and get in without getting rejected for too much digital manipulation?

Ween
09-14-2006, 04:22 AM
could they be put together in Photoshop and get in without getting rejected for too much digital manipulation?

Probably not...

devights
09-14-2006, 07:34 AM
Well you could do it (I have pulled this off with some success at making it look real, although nothing like that is on RP for me). What I would suggest when you do it is this, USE A TRIPOD, the easiest way to make it look real is to make sure that the camera doesn't move at all between shots. Second set your camera on manual mode and use the same exposure settings for both shots, it'll look way off if you use a 2 second exposure for the sign and a 30 second exposure for the train. Lastly make sure the lighting is the same between each shot, ie don't shoot one in dusk conditions and the other in complete darkness.
If you can do all that the pictures should just line up pretty easily on photoshop and you can use a brush tool with a soft edge to cut away everything but the sign in one layer and it should look pretty realistic, although you could also tweak the opacity on that layer to make it a tad lighter and less chance of it not looking realistic!

jdirelan87
09-14-2006, 12:59 PM
I remember from my film days that most 35mm SLRs would allow you to shoot more than one exposure on the same frame. I would assume that you could do the same with digital SLRs, that way you wouldn't even need to anything in photoshop.

Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
09-14-2006, 06:57 PM
If two exposures were done, one short to get the neon, and another longer, to get the train and so fourth, were taken from the same spot, could they be put together in Photoshop and get in without getting rejected for too much digital manipulation?
Well if they were taken from the same spot than you wouldn't need to "put together" anything because you can just use a MULTIPLE EXPOSURE setting to take two pictures on a single frame. Technically I do not believe it would digitally manipulated if you TAKE the photo that way so you would be able to get it accepted if it is up to the standards. If you are very serious about getting this shot and there is absolutely no way to turn the sign on and off you can try to cover that portion of the photo after allowing it to 'appear' in a long exposure.

[photoid=118686]
In this photo I was using a Fuji Finepix S7000 which did not have a BULB setting so I set it to 'multiple exposure' and MANUAL for 30 seconds. Between flashes I had to OK the first frame and click the shutter to get the next few flashes all on the same frame.

[photoid=153312]
In this photo I had to do what I mentioned above and cover the lens halfway through the photo. Because I was across the street (even at 12AM) I had to deal with cars going past so I needed a solution as to prevent the headlights from messing up the shot. About a minute or two into the exposure the light down the street turned green and one car was going straight past the crossing. Since I was across the street lighting the scene I dashed back and had to come up with an idea VERY fast. I quickly took my hat off and placed it in front of the camera being careful not to hit it or shake it. After the car passed I removed the hat and the exposure continued for another minute or two as I lit the train.

I think combining these two options is the best choice to get the results you want. I do not know how the sign would be situated in your photo, but I recommend you can try to come up with a "patch" to place in front of just that spot on the lens. Set the camera to "multiple exposure" and take a short exposure of the sign included in the photo as to where it is legible, then gently attach the "patch" over the lens where the sign is located and take a longer exposure making the rest of the scene perfectly exposed. A lot of practice shots may be needed to get it perfect, but if its well composed it will be worth it. Hope my rambling helps, good luck, and I look forward to seeing this shot!

Cyclonetrain
09-14-2006, 11:57 PM
I dont think it should be against the rules if you are just taking 5 60 second exposure shots and combining them as one. If you had a 5 minuite exposure, there would be alot of noise to ruin the shot