PDA

View Full Version : Question about Digital Cameras


esketcher
09-28-2006, 06:00 AM
I know that I can't afford a thousand dollars for a quality camera but I do have a couple lower priced products for taking Images.

the Question is that everythime I take a Picture outside it kinda comes out dark do I need to have the Flash on or do i just use Software to render the Image to a better quality?

I have two digital cameras one at 5.1 megapixel and the other 6.6 megapixel.

SD70MACMAN
09-28-2006, 08:16 AM
Remember, a $1000 camera doesnt make you a better photographer. Its not the camera, its the person behind the camera.

If possible, try and fix the "darkness" issue on the camera. Photo software can only do so much to lighten things before the levels, colors, and contrast become out of whack.

Doing this varies on the camera model. Read the manual (dont worry, your manhood will come back) and see how to either a) adjust the "film speed" of the camera or b) set the bracketing to "zero". You may be taking pics in too dark of conditions, the camera is smiluation ASA 100ish film (but like hte real thing, it has effects on color, grain, etc), or it could be bracketing to underexpose the image by 2/3 or even a full f-stop. Any one of those things will result in dark pics.

Use the flash, try the steps above, or use a tripod. Hope this helps!

Niles
09-28-2006, 08:52 PM
You sounded like me a few months ago. Read this thread I posted a while back. It helped me, so it should with you too. Photo Shooting Tips Link (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=3830)

Pat Lorenz
09-30-2006, 05:54 AM
esketcher, Sounds like you just need to do some research as to setting your camera up right. Remeber, photography just takes trail and error, so you just need to play with settings. You dont need a expensive camera.

But

this

Its not the camera, its the person behind the camera.

Is a completley wrong statement, equipment does matter, its just what is pratical for the useage of that equipment that designates how far you really need to go with spending.

But as far as esketcher goes, you wont get it the first time, just play around.

Cyclonetrain
09-30-2006, 06:04 AM
Is a completley wrong statement, equipment does matter, its just what is pratical for the useage of that equipment that designates how far you really need to go with spending.

But as far as esketcher goes, you wont get it the first time, just play around.
I'm gonna say I think that your camera doesn't matter. Get out there and shoot. Dont worry about what you have. Have fun and keep your wallet happy! No need to spend $1,000 on a camera when you have a working camera that you haven't yet begun to realise the potential of!
dont forget to add that spending $1000 on the body and $100 on the lens is the wrong way to do it

Ru1056
09-30-2006, 06:13 AM
Is a completley wrong statement, equipment does matter, its just what is pratical for the useage of that equipment that designates how far you really need to go with spending.

No it is not. Equpiment matters as far as quality of the picture taken by the camera, not the photographer. Obviously a 10 MP pic is gonna look better than a 4 MP pic.

If you buy one of those $1000 cameras, and don't know how to use it properly, what have you accomplished?

Pat Lorenz
10-02-2006, 05:40 PM
If you buy one of those $1000 cameras, and don't know how to use it properly, what have you accomplished?

True, but as you get better, you will realize you were wrong. I am not saying right off the bat get expensive equiptment (keep in mind not all good is equipment is nessasarily expensive). I am saying that yes the person matters, but thats not the half of it. The camera (not nessasarily the body)really does make a differeance. Especially the rest of the components as well. Basically the whole package matters, its about having the right tools.

Its like in construction, the right equipment matters and its not just the person who makes the building its the equipment that mattered as well.

esketcher
10-11-2006, 06:36 AM
Thanks guys I'll have to keep those ideas in mind when I catch the engines.

Since they don't just stop here they usually roll right through the place, That is except for VIA Rail.

I don't think that it's the camera doing the lighting problem it's more like where I am standing and where the sun is at the time of shooting, Sometimes I can get a nice bright image when the sun is behind me and other times is when the sun is in front of me I tend to get a darker image. It could also be at what time it is during the day.

a231pacific
10-12-2006, 12:55 AM
I don't think that it's the camera doing the lighting problem it's more like where I am standing and where the sun is at the time of shooting, Sometimes I can get a nice bright image when the sun is behind me and other times is when the sun is in front of me I tend to get a darker image. It could also be at what time it is during the day.

OK, you've now given us some more information. It's the camera and the way you are using it! When the sun is behind you, your camera's meter is reading the scene correctly. When you are facing into the sun, your camera is picking up the bright sunlight and interpreting the scene incorrectly. Your camera may have a "back light" setting. If it does, try that. If it doesn't (and you don't have manual settings) try aiming the camera about 90 degrees from the sun, pushing the shutter release part way down and holding it, then aiming your camera back where you wanted and then taking the picture. This may hold your exposure setting and allow for a better exposure. If you have manual settings, then just take a test shot and then open up your aperature, or change your shutter speed until you finally get the scene looking the way you want. Obviously you need to do this before the train shows up!

Michael Allen