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View Full Version : Bad Motive Rejection for Time Exposures


becker
11-11-2006, 09:48 PM
Has anyone else had time exposure photos get rejected for "bad motive"? I had a legitimate time exposure of an Amtrak train get rejected for this today. I guess I don't quite understand which photos like this are accepted and which are rejected. :-(

~Louis Becker

Joe the Photog
11-11-2006, 09:58 PM
Obviously, we would need to see the rejected picture in order to coment on it.


Joe

becker
11-11-2006, 10:02 PM
Obviously, we would need to see the rejected picture in order to coment on it.

Here you go:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=306372 :(

Mgoldman
11-11-2006, 10:24 PM
Way to dark - not enough detail is visible in the photo to make it interesting.
Atleast, in my opinion.

/Mitch

StL-rail
11-11-2006, 11:01 PM
Yes, way too dark. You need to be able to tell the photo is of a train right away. I couldn't tell that it was railroad related until I noticed the crossbucks. It's best to include some type of signal or other light in the photo to enhance the railroad feeling as well. Example:
[photoid=106947]

Joe the Photog
11-12-2006, 12:29 AM
Night time railroad shots are not the easiest thing to get the hang of. The hardest part is lighting the shot which, obviously, gets harder when there is no light around. Like this one I shot --

[photoid=132408]

Almost all of the light is coming from the oncoming train. I had to use the headlights of my car in order to focus on the track, but when I got the focus, I shot the lights off. A little light is coming from a street lamp nearby.


Joe

Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
11-13-2006, 10:02 PM
I'm sure we've all heard the expression, "I've got good news and bad news", at least once in our lives, and it applies here as well.

First off, the good news, its a brilliant idea for a photo IMO.

Now, the bad news, its not that brilliant of a shot. Like everyone ahs said already, it is too dark. It is an easy fix, but it will required going to that spot of any other with crossbucks and taking another photo. Next time, just leave the shuter open a bit longer to get brighter "streaks" but not too long cause I think you want the crossbucks silhouetted. It's a really cool idea and the only problem is with the technical stuff. Good luck!

Christopher Muller
11-13-2006, 10:58 PM
Just to add a few more comments...

It appears there is some camera blur also. Like the camera moved up or down on the tripod. How long of exposure did you use?

In this shot I used a 59 second exposure...
[photoid=162296]

You have to make sure your tripod is tight and free of any movement or vibration. Maybe and even higher ISO setting would help. With the lights in the background, there may be some exposure issues. If you are trying to silhouette the crossbucks, make sure there is no light source behind you.

You may also have to manually focus the camera. The picture overall looks blurry with no defined area that the camera focused on. To focus, what I use is a huge spotlight I got at Walmart for under $20. I shine on the subject, focus and turn the camera to manual so when I'm ready to shoot, its already focused.

Night shots are different, you have to think them out and set them up before a train comes. I love shooting at night, its a challenge. The best thing about night shots, unless you are including stars in the shot, it generally doesn't matter if its cloudy or clear. (also not including heavy light pollution)

Christopher Muller
11-13-2006, 11:02 PM
...one more thing I forgot to add. A remote for your camera is a very good investment. Mine for my Rebel XT only cost $25 (on sale at Best Buy). The best tool for night shooting IMO, second to a good solid tripod. A remote for the Rebel XT allows you to control how long the exposure is on the BULB shutter speed. I've shot pictures at almost five minutes. The nice thing, you can shoot as short or as long as you want, or until your battery dies.

Bill
11-14-2006, 02:43 AM
To focus, what I use is a huge spotlight I got at Walmart for under $20. I shine on the subject, focus and turn the camera to manual so when I'm ready to shoot, its already focused.


Nice to hear that I'm not the only one who carries a spotlight with me on night shoot to help meter my shots. Keep up the good work Christopher.

ken45
12-19-2006, 12:10 AM
I'm ghetto...I use my car headlights!

Nscalemike
12-19-2006, 09:05 PM
I'm ghetto...I use my car headlights!

You mean you can't afford over a dozen tripods and slave/flash units like the rest of us to light up your image? Shame on you!! ;-)

trainboysd40
12-20-2006, 12:35 AM
The night shots I like to take aren't meant to have detail like that, IMO...if I amy hijack this thread, ehre are two 'Bad motive's that I'd like an opinion on.
http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b274/trainboysd40/twinbridgestimelapseone.jpg
http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b274/trainboysd40/F1000012.jpg
For both of them, I only had the lens open as long as the train was in the viewfinder...I think it was f/8 for both.

Bill
12-20-2006, 02:08 AM
ehre are two 'Bad motive's that I'd like an opinion on.


Both are over-exposed & have harsh blown whites. The 2nd one actually makes me squint to look at it.
I'd recommend a lower number ISO, a shorter shutter or a higher number aperture.
I've also learned from personal experience (trust me, I have shots that look very much like your 2nd shot) not to line up the camera in a spot directly where the beam will be pointing. If possible, position yourself higher than the track.

Shots like this are very much trial & error...every location has a different amount of available light...there's no set formula for success.

Good luck,
Bill

Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
12-20-2006, 05:10 PM
The night shots I like to take aren't meant to have detail like that, IMO...if I may hijack this thread, here are two 'Bad motive's that I'd like an opinion on.

For both of them, I only had the lens open as long as the train was in the viewfinder...I think it was f/8 for both.
Since this is an open forum here's my thoughts. I think the first one could have been/be a real winner with detail. As Bill stated use a low ISO and high aperture (something I have started copying from him...thanks, Bill!). If you had gotten more detail in the truss bridge and/or in the building in the distance this would have a little more "intrique" than just a line of light. Of course this is just a suggestion and an opinion so it is not necessary to even consider. I would have done a test shot figuring how long the train would be in the frame and see what the correct settings would be.

Bill
12-20-2006, 06:57 PM
As Bill stated use a low ISO and high aperture (something I have started copying from him...thanks, Bill!)

Ha, no problem. I may have mentioned this before, so forgive me for being redundant, but I shoot a lot of night shots (trains & otherwise) & probably 95 times out of 100, I'll be at ISO 200. I also like higher number apertures for night shots (f16 and higher)...they tend to give better starbursts, rather than big glowing orbs.

Thanks,
Bill