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Ken Carr
02-27-2007, 08:30 PM
I'm sure this is a simple question for the group and this isn't some killer photo I need to have on RP. But it has been rejected and I need an opinion as to why other than just bad cropping, so that I can improve my skills, so any suggestions or ideas would be helpful thanks in advance...Ken http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=342995

Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
02-27-2007, 10:06 PM
I'm sure this is a simple question for the group and this isn't some killer photo I need to have on RP. But it has been rejected and I need an opinion as to why other than just bad cropping, so that I can improve my skills, so any suggestions or ideas would be helpful thanks in advance...Ken http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=342995
1. Show the rest of the train.
2. Watch for putting poles in an awkward spot like behind the locomotive.
3. Try to avoid centering the train in the photo. If the sky is bland include more foreground. If there is a cool sky pattern include less foreground. I'm not saying go nuts and put the train ALL the way on the top or bottom.

Joe the Photog
02-27-2007, 11:06 PM
Pretty much what he said. But beware of when Mitch Goldman sees that shot. He's a stickler for seeing the train NOT get cut off.

:D

I personally think this is a case where the clone tool could copme in handy.


Joe

Mgoldman
02-27-2007, 11:45 PM
Pretty much what he said. But beware of when Mitch Goldman sees that shot. He's a stickler for seeing the train NOT get cut off.

:D

I personally think this is a case where the clone tool could copme in handy.


Joe

Did someone say my name? Sheesh, Joe, I think I said that once!
But personally, I do find a photo more appealing when the subject isn't cut off (unless naturally). It's like taking a picture of your girlfriend but cutting off her feet. There's just something missing that should be there, like, I don't know... like Lancaster and Chester without steam.

The pole jarring out is a tough one, it pays when shooting digital these days to fire off a few for such unforseen events.

One idea I would have for that particular picture, Ken, would be to actually cut off the freight cars, then in effect, you have not cut off the subject which is now strictly the group of engines.

My 2

/Mitch
Stop, look and comment!
<A HREF="http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=11960">Click Here</A> to take a look at my photos on RP.

alan-crotty
02-28-2007, 08:01 AM
Ken,

That pole is so obtrusive!

Before the train arrives try to visualise your shot, look around the scene, (see the pole) then work out where your going to press the button.
I don't know what was to the right out of the shot, but buy swinging your camera round a bit you could have improved on two things:

1. The pole would have been positioned on the left edge of the phot providing some information about the way communication used to be.

2. You may have included the back of the train (and made Mitch happy) and a bit more scenery.

There is little interest in the foreground or the blank sky so why not crop to 3x2 format and get rid of those bits.


Alan

JimThias
02-28-2007, 11:49 AM
Ken,

That pole is so obtrusive!

Before the train arrives try to visualise your shot, look around the scene, (see the pole) then work out where your going to press the button.

Alan's advice is perfect. I'm always looking at the juxtaposition of poles and whatnot before I shoot a scene. I hate things "growing" out of the top of my subjects, and the pole in your scene is about as bad as it gets. That CAN be easily corrected, either by shooting before the lead loco reaches the pole or if that's not possible, a few minutes with the clone tool in photoshop.

As already stated early, try not to put the train in the middle of the frame. There is much that can be cropped from the bottom, putting the train in the lower 3rd instead of nearly dead in the middle.

I also agree with the train cut off by the right side of the frame. Simple solution here is to make sure when you set up your shot, you can see the rest of the train down the tracks and you have room to the right (or left) of the train (landscape, buildings, another train, etc). I think the only time the train getting cut off by the frame looks ok is when the tracks curve OUT of the scene. But the straight away cutoffs aren't very appealing.

Joe the Photog
02-28-2007, 01:13 PM
There's just something missing that should be there, like, I don't know... like Lancaster and Chester without steam.

You really know how to cut to the heart of a man, don't you? LOL

:D

Honestly, I never thought too much about cutting off the rear of a train until you mentioned it. Now I find myself going over that in my mind when I'm setting up a shot. I'm not sure whether to thank you, Mitch, or cuss you!

:roll:


Joe