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VRE Man
03-22-2004, 08:58 PM
Photo ID 42973 was rejected from the database.
Railroad: Amtrak
Locomotive: GE P42DC

Reason for Rejection: bad cropping - train should fill more of the frame
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=42973

This just does not make any sense, I among others have many photos that have much less frame fill so I am stumped on this one.


Also,

Railroad: CSX Transportation (CSXT)
Locomotive: EMD SD70M
Reason for Rejection: we are not in need of any more marginally lit CSX wedge shots

This I could go into a long drawn out rebuttle about this rejection. I'm not mad about the rejection it is the comments attached that concern me. The latest batch of photos I had uploaded where really the BEST I had shot since last October IMPO at Featherstone (Same Location). Up close, Really up close for that matter, Lighting was hard with 50 mph winds and clouds. But it was not the light I was concerned with it was the detail.

Anyways I'm just trying to get this straight?

dsktc
03-22-2004, 11:26 PM
Hi, Jason.

All of us have had photos rejected by
the screeners, so don't take it personally.

The Amtrak photo would have benefited
from cropping a quarter of the image from the bottom.

Dave

Chris Starnes
03-23-2004, 02:05 AM
I wouldn't worry so much about the detail of the engine unless it was a pure roster shot. Most of us know all to well what the standard CSX road engine looks like.

Fine a scenic spot, plan a shot (lighting and direction of the train), then go execute and try to avoid the standard 'here comes the train down the tracks' shot. I think you will find your results will be much better.

CTS

oltmannd
03-23-2004, 05:19 PM
I think what they're trying to say is the train isn't centered in the shot. There is more space between the front of the train and the right hand edge than there is from the rear to the left hand edge. It doesn't help that what's shown between the train and the right edge looks junky and distracting.

Did you consider shooting this with a "normal" lens? The thing that makes the Auto train unique is that it is LOOOONNNG! The tele shot make the train look short. A normal lens would have accentuated the length.

-Don

Save The Wave
03-23-2004, 11:17 PM
I think what they're trying to say is the train isn't centered in the shot. There is more space between the front of the train and the right hand edge than there is from the rear to the left hand edge. It doesn't help that what's shown between the train and the right edge looks junky and distracting.

-Don

Then explain how this one got accepted (no offense meant to the photgrapher)

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=54740

Ween
03-23-2004, 11:43 PM
I think what they're trying to say is the train isn't centered in the shot. There is more space between the front of the train and the right hand edge than there is from the rear to the left hand edge. It doesn't help that what's shown between the train and the right edge looks junky and distracting.

-Don

Then explain how this one got accepted (no offense meant to the photgrapher)

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=54740

Yeah, I wondered about this one too. Not because of bad cropping, but because it's partially obscured. I've had several rejected for "foreground clutter," but it was usually for a wire or weeds, but this is far more obscuring. Either way, it's not my call...I just snap 'em and submit 'em...

Chris Starnes
03-24-2004, 12:38 AM
Interesting question.....

Sometimes it is easy to hit the accept option when you mean to hit the reject :lol:

CTS

urslow
03-24-2004, 01:20 AM
Boy I'd like to have the reject / accept button in my hands for a day or two. Can you buy them at Radio Shack? :D :D

oltmannd
03-25-2004, 11:45 AM
I think what they're trying to say is the train isn't centered in the shot. There is more space between the front of the train and the right hand edge than there is from the rear to the left hand edge. It doesn't help that what's shown between the train and the right edge looks junky and distracting.

-Don

Then explain how this one got accepted (no offense meant to the photgrapher)

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=54740

That's easy. It's a roster shot of rare optic orange wheels stops. The locomotive is just part of the backdrop!

There definetely is a lack of consistency in the screening, but given how the owners have set the system up, I don't think its unreasonably so. It's always going to carry the individual biases of each screener and be a very subjective process. I'm sure if we could think of some suggestiong that would improve the process w/o it taking more of their time, they'd consider them.

-Don

Chris Starnes
03-25-2004, 01:09 PM
I'm sure if we could think of some suggestiong that would improve the process w/o it taking more of their time, they'd consider them.

We are more than willing to hear some suggestions......anybody?

ddavies
03-30-2004, 04:28 PM
Since it has been 5 days, I can not see the image that Jason is talking about, but as I look at the image he has under his name, I can see what his problem is.

The tendancy of a lot of people is to shoot with the object of interest is the middle of the picture. From any photo course, you will learn the rule of thirds. Divide the image by thirds both horizontal and vertical. Your object of interest should fall along one of those lines. For most impact, it should fall at an intersection.

In Jason's picture, the Conrail unit falls in the middle. To make this image better, crop out some of the dead space to the left of the engine and the ballast below, until the Conrail unit falls on the intersection of the first line from the left, and the first line (third) from the bottom.

Unlike a slide, where you are trapped with what you shot, once you have a digital image, use a photo editing program to improve your image.

Chris, maybe you guys need to give some lessons (like I just did), rather than have comments that a non-photographer does may not understand. And you may need some retired professional photographers as screeners ... hint ...

Ween
03-31-2004, 02:42 AM
Chris, maybe you guys need to give some lessons (like I just did), rather than have comments that a non-photographer does may not understand. And you may need some retired professional photographers as screeners ... hint ...

Thanks for the info on thirds. Good stuff. But I disagree with having someone with a professional eye with a history of professional photography screening pictures. I fear the focus of the site would move away from submitting photos "enjoyable to other rail enthusiasts" to one more along the lines of "well, your subject was too far left and not at an intersecting point with the horizon." In other words, moving away from subject and more to method.

Just a thought from someone who likes the picture for what's in it, not the angles behind it...

ddavies
03-31-2004, 11:23 AM
Duh ... I am trying to raise the level of all railfan photography. If you don't know what makes a good picture, how can you help anyone improve and lessen all the griping about rejected photos?

Curtis Wininger
03-31-2004, 04:01 PM
The subject at hand is a photo what was not positioned well in the frame. Dave made a good point about how to fix that.

clearnorth
04-01-2004, 06:48 AM
Why not just let all pictures of acceptable railroad subject be viewed in a temporary category, then let your viewers decide by popularity which photos are acceptable to them and which are not. After all, without your viewers, you wouldn't have a website.