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View Full Version : Where is the line for Eastern US and Western US?


dhuber
06-14-2004, 07:11 PM
Where is the dividing line between Eastern US and Western US? Is it the Mississippi River? I am sure this has been stated before but I could not find it. :oops: :roll: :)

Chris Starnes
06-14-2004, 07:45 PM
I can't remember if we have actually ever stated one way or the other, but that sounds like a good dividing line to me.
CTS

J
06-16-2004, 11:50 AM
The traditional railroad "gateways" are Chicago, St. Louis, Memphis and New Orleans. All but Chicago are, of course on the Mississippi river. The first road west of this line of cities was the CNW when it built west from the Chicago river accross from the location of the Holiday Inn Merchandise Mart. CNW would certainly be considered a "western" road. But things are not so easy. NS (certainly an eastern road) reaches Kansas City via the former Wabash Route and BNSF (certainly a western road) reaches deep into Alabama via the former Frisco.

One way to view this is to look at operating rules. Eastern roads generally used "speed signals" while western roads used "route signals." Conrail employees were challenged to distinguish the difference between medium approach and approach medium while the western guys kept things simpler.

E.M. Bell
06-16-2004, 10:22 PM
One way to view this is to look at operating rules. Eastern roads generally used "speed signals" while western roads used "route signals." Conrail employees were challenged to distinguish the difference between medium approach and approach medium while the western guys kept things simpler.

Conrail and CX signals are most confusing. Several years ago on a NS Steam trip we where operating on the CSX through Cinncinati and when we questioned the aspect of a couple of signals, the old cigar chomping N&W roadforeman that was with us made a profound statement that made sense, and scared the heck out of at the same time "Boys, if it aint all red, it aint red at all...keep going" :)