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View Full Version : Canon 20D - First Impressions


dsktc
09-20-2004, 01:43 AM
I picked up my Canon 20D at the Harrisburg UPS
terminal Friday evening.

As has been reported, it is slightly smaller
and lighter than the 10D. Navigating the camera
menu was easy and straightforward, particularly if you have
used a 10D or Digital Rebel.

The only change I made, besides the time, was to brighten the
LCD. The factory setting was too dark, in my opinion.

I set the camera on center focus and retained the
Large Fine image setting, which is 3504 x 2336 pixels.
I will take a few Raw images later this week.

I used it most of yesterday and appreciated
the quick turn on feature and the five frames per
second shooting. Both of these are significant
improvements over the 10D.

I shot in mostly sunny skies in the afternoon
using manual mode and a few test shots in Program
and Full Automatic.

I experienced the lens lock-up problem, which
has been reported on the Canon DPR Forum, just
one time. The solution is to turn off the camera,
remove the battery, and re-insert it.

The real issue is do 8 megapixels matter?
The answer is yes - but a 5 or 6 megapixel
camera will also produce excellent images.

The consequence of using Large Fine, 3504 x 2336,
is that some of the 120 photos I took yesterday are
quite large. Image size varied from 2.6 megabytes
to 5.4. A large hard drive or a zip drive is,
therefore, recommended.

Also, an uncropped image submitted to RP.Net has to
be resized to about 30% versus 40% for the 10D.
That means that you need to be judicious in the use
of unsharp mask.

I hope to do a side by side comparison
of the two cameras this week, i.e., a static shot on
a tripod with the same lens and exposures.

The 20D represents an evolutionary improvement
in digital cameras. Although film clearly excels in
resolution, most quality digital cameras will
produce an image that can be printed as an 8x10
enlargement - which I've done with 10D photos -
that look as good as film.

So, if you are considering a Digital SLR, the
Canon 20D with its 8.2 megapixels has raised the bar.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=78333

Dave

Chris Starnes
09-20-2004, 01:54 AM
Dave,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts on the 20D. I know several of our viewers have anxious thoughts about getting one.

Chris

JButler
09-20-2004, 02:11 PM
The 20D adds another question for those who may just be getting into digital. I am still shooting film, with a Canon A-1, and a Rebel Ti I picked up to see how the new Canons work. I am planning on gettng a Canon digital.
With the advent of the 20D, prices on the 10D are falling. You can pick up a new 10D for a grand or less, while the 20D seems to be hanging around 1499 and up.
So if I am buying my first digital, is the 10D still a good choice? I could invest the money saved in a lens. Or should I stop being so tight and just jump on the 20D.

Chris Starnes
09-20-2004, 03:11 PM
So if I am buying my first digital, is the 10D still a good choice? I could invest the money saved in a lens. Or should I stop being so tight and just jump on the 20D.

I wouldn't argue with that thought process any, Jim.

A camera is only as good as the lens you have on it. A 10D with a quality lens will produce a better result than a 20D will with a cheapy lens.

Chris

dsktc
09-20-2004, 11:18 PM
Jim, the 10D is a great choice for your first digital
SLR. Regardless of which Canon camera you buy,
I recommend the Canon 70-200m L lens (non-IS)
and either the 17-40mm or 24-70mm Canon lens
for wide angle shooting.

Dave

wirailfan
09-21-2004, 12:08 AM
Dave,

Nice review. I'm debating on a 20D or a 1D MKII. I haven't made the decision quite yet........ either one should be fabulous based upon the performance of the 10D.

Why the recommendation for the 70-200mm L non-IS? I have the IS-version and love it!

Tom

dsktc
09-21-2004, 12:13 AM
Hi, Tom.

I recommended the non-IS 70-200mm
because it is cheaper. (I'm a frugal Scot.)

Dave

Jonathan Guy
10-05-2004, 04:33 AM
A couple of reply's here:

Dave Kerr:

Had you just performed a lens swap before the lockup occured? I haven't had a problem out of my 20D, but after a year with the 10D I try to be very careful to turn the camera off before swapping lens.

Jim Butler:

The 10D is a good camera, I'm going to keep mine as a backup/2nd body for times when I'd like to shoot telephoto and wide angle at the same location. Depending on the glass you currently own, saving $500-$600 on the body could help you get into a 17-40 f4 lens which translates to a 27.2-64mm lens on a film body.

Since you already have the Rebel Ti, I'd recommend keeping the one film body for 2 reasons.

1. You'll have a backup body to your new 10D/20D that uses the same lens/flash etc.

2. There are those rare times that you'll need the full frame for a wide angle shot that the 1.6 crop factor of the digital can't provide. This usually happens in a museum setting, shop tour, etc. where you'll be very close to the subject to be photographed.