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-   -   I guess I need a chain saw... (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=16226)

Watain 03-17-2013 04:21 AM

I guess I need a chain saw...
 
When I heard that NS was running a steam excursion through the Bristol line last weekend, I knew that I would be going to Seven Mile Ford. A classic location, however any hope of getting a non obstructed shot has been ruined by trees. Thoughts, and opinions?

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...79&key=7598584

And yes I know I did cut off some of the tender, I actually didn't realize it until I got home on the computer...

wds 03-17-2013 04:28 AM

A chain saw, or a very tall ladder! :D

JRMDC 03-17-2013 04:28 AM

Sorry, trees trash it for me, one of the nice things about shooting steam up high is the running gear and here it is obscured. Next frame would be good, get that nose all the way over near the next patch of obstruction.

Watain 03-17-2013 04:39 AM

Yeah unfortunately this was the best frame from this spot. They were doing every bit of track speed as they came through, so I didn't click the shutter fast enough.. If I had it to do over I would have used the 8fps burst my camera has to my advantage...

JimThias 03-17-2013 07:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Watain (Post 164761)
If I had it to do over I would have used the 8fps burst my camera has to my advantage...

Geezuz, that should be a default, especially when shooting bridge shots with a small window of opportunity! With digital, there is no reason not to machine gun it with a scene like this. ;-)

Ron Flanary 03-17-2013 03:35 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Wayne---we were ahead of the train at this point, and I was scouting good locations for my two friends from Kentucky, who weren't as familiar with the line. On old US 11 we drove my the old depot at Seven Mile Ford (no good shot...), and one of them asked about the "famous" O Winston Link bridge shot. For those who don't know, this was taken in December 1957, during the last month of steam on the Bristol Line:

http://forums.railpictures.net/attac...1&d=1363530626

Of course the old house on the right is gone, but the bridge is obviously still there. As we got closer, I could see a throng of cars at the bridge, so we pressed on to Marion instead. Even in 1957, it was a very tight shot. Today, it's nearly impossible---unless you have a machine gun shutter, as Jim noted. If more of the engine had been visible before the next group of tree branches obscured the front, it would have been a nice shot.

As a matter of trivia, the class J roaring across the bridge in 1957 (on train 42, the eastbound "Pelican") is none other than famous 611.

Ron Flanary 03-17-2013 03:40 PM

One other thing: I scrambled up to the top of that bridge abutment in 1983 to shoot S&A Pacific 750 (and two green Southern FP7s) on a steam special. The shot turned out great---but someone had painted---in large white lettering---the old familiar suggestion ("F.... You") on the opposite abutment. The lettering was really large too, so there was no way of missing it. Of course this was a 35mm slide, so in the days before Photoshop, there was nothing you could do. I filed it away somewhere, but I really should find it, scan it, clean it up and post it on RP.net. Except for that little flaw, it's a nice shot. And then again---it might be good the way it is. :)

KevinM 03-17-2013 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 164764)
Geezuz, that should be a default, especially when shooting bridge shots with a small window of opportunity! With digital, there is no reason not to machine gun it with a scene like this. ;-)

I second Jim's advice. When shooting a scene where the exact position of the train is critical, always shoot in burst mode. In fact, the shutter release mode on my D7000 seldom ever leaves the CH (continuous high) position. I can still shoot single frames, but full-auto fire is a trigger pull away.

Gun the subject down!! You can always delete the non-keepers later. ;)

Watain 03-23-2013 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 164764)
Geezuz, that should be a default, especially when shooting bridge shots with a small window of opportunity! With digital, there is no reason not to machine gun it with a scene like this. ;-)

I wasn't thinking quite clearly, I was running on two hours of sleep lol. ;) I even had the focus locked I don't know why I didn't turn on machine gun mode..

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron Flanary (Post 164766)
Wayne---we were ahead of the train at this point, and I was scouting good locations for my two friends from Kentucky, who weren't as familiar with the line. On old US 11 we drove my the old depot at Seven Mile Ford (no good shot...), and one of them asked about the "famous" O Winston Link bridge shot. For those who don't know, this was taken in December 1957, during the last month of steam on the Bristol Line:

http://forums.railpictures.net/attac...1&d=1363530626


Of course the old house on the right is gone, but the bridge is obviously still there. As we got closer, I could see a throng of cars at the bridge, so we pressed on to Marion instead. Even in 1957, it was a very tight shot. Today, it's nearly impossible---unless you have a machine gun shutter, as Jim noted. If more of the engine had been visible before the next group of tree branches obscured the front, it would have been a nice shot.

As a matter of trivia, the class J roaring across the bridge in 1957 (on train 42, the eastbound "Pelican") is none other than famous 611.

Thanks for the history lesson Ron, unfortunately this is where my chase ended' and even though the shot didn't make it onto here I'm still happy that I shot it. Hopefully they'll run it next year so I can try again.
Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinM (Post 164769)
I second Jim's advice. When shooting a scene where the exact position of the train is critical, always shoot in burst mode. In fact, the shutter release mode on my D7000 seldom ever leaves the CH (continuous high) position. I can still shoot single frames, but full-auto fire is a trigger pull away.

Gun the subject down!! You can always delete the non-keepers later. ;)

Thanks I will from now on! The D700 can do 8fps, my worry was the buffer filling up to fast. I need faster cards.

JimThias 03-24-2013 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Watain (Post 164900)
Thanks I will from now on! The D700 can do 8fps, my worry was the buffer filling up to fast. I need faster cards.

I have slow cards and fast cards and the slow cards never have any issues with machine gunning.


http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/s...onfused005.gif

Watain 03-24-2013 11:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 164915)
I have slow cards and fast cards and the slow cards never have any issues with machine gunning.


http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/s...onfused005.gif

I don't know what it is, I think it's because I shoot in 14 bit uncompressed RAW. All I know is the buffer fills up fast. Or it could be that Nikon sucks. :lol:

JimThias 03-25-2013 12:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Watain (Post 164921)
I don't know what it is, I think it's because I shoot in 14 bit uncompressed RAW. All I know is the buffer fills up fast. Or it could be that Nikon sucks. :lol:

Can you explain? What exactly happens? How many pics are your machine gunning? And then what?

When I machine gun a scene, it's usually 6-8 images at the most. I guess I don't understand where the buffering issues come into play.

Watain 03-27-2013 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 164924)
Can you explain? What exactly happens? How many pics are your machine gunning? And then what?

When I machine gun a scene, it's usually 6-8 images at the most. I guess I don't understand where the buffering issues come into play.

Yeah that's about what I can get 6-8, I don't know why I was worried about it.


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