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-   -   ...And I thought it was good. (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=18228)

spacetrain1983 03-29-2019 07:03 PM

...And I thought it was good.
 
1 Attachment(s)
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...49&key=9012822
Another PIQ...
Original file pre-editing: Attachment 9722
I got this shot on a trip to the coast last week, and I thought it was one of my best, but apparently not...

bigbassloyd 03-29-2019 07:33 PM

The lights kill any shot of it being added here. They are overpowering and extremely detrimental to the composition.

You have to shoot zoom compositions somewhat differently in poor weather because of the amount of light gathering involved versus a sunny nose lit day. Lower quality equipment makes it even more difficult.




Loyd L.

KevinM 03-29-2019 08:06 PM

Yeah, the headlight halos are pretty obnoxious. I wonder, were you using any filters? Pulling those off definitely helps in this kind of shot. What did you shoot it with?

Anytime you have bright lights smack dab in the middle of the frame, it's a set-up for blow-outs, lens flares and other optical effects. The rain definitely doesn't make those situations better because you are effectively shooting through thousands of little prisms. When I'm shooting in the rain, I bring the best glass I own and I do remove the filters. I also make sure I dry the lens surface off just before taking the shot. No sense shooting with those prisms right on the lens.

spacetrain1983 03-29-2019 09:06 PM

I wasn't using any filters, just the camera and the built-in lens. Having to hold a raincoat over my head while taking the shot definitely didn't help things. Used a Canon Powershot SX530HS.

miningcamper1 03-30-2019 02:17 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Getting rid of all that red helps some, as does reducing the highlights some.
Even so, would the screeners reconsider? Probably not. The ditch lights still overwhelm.

RobJor 04-04-2019 07:09 PM

Hi, impressed you tried that with your camera and submitted, I rate it as an almost. Shooting into the headlights in low light and rain is tricky, most I see either have some blown out headlights or are very underexposed to contain the problem(creative).

Moving forward, my thought is you want to be a little further off the track and shoot later when the train lights not so direct, when the headlights are not focused directly into your sensor but aimed past you and underexpose slightly, in your case ISO 200 instead of 500.

Or - underexpose the heck out of it and hope it will be accepted as creative(I see a good amount of those), just not sure when it becomes creative. or try to bring up the shadows in processing but probably will not work well with your camera and requires good software.

Anyway, I think this a good first try on something not so easy and fairly rare here.

Bob

JimThias 04-05-2019 02:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RobJor (Post 195382)
Moving forward, my thought is you want to be a little further off the track and shoot later when the train lights not so direct, when the headlights are not focused directly into your sensor but aimed past you and underexpose slightly, in your case ISO 200 instead of 500.


Huh? He'll want to increase the ISO substantially so he can use a faster shutter speed to control the blown out headlights. ISO 200 in low light just means he'd have to counter that with a slower shutter speed resulting in the headlights being blown out even more.

KevinM 04-05-2019 04:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 195384)
Huh? He'll want to increase the ISO substantially so he can use a faster shutter speed to control the blown out headlights. ISO 200 in low light just means he'd have to counter that with a slower shutter speed resulting in the headlights being blown out even more.

Jim,

I think he's using a P&S camera, which should not prevent him from controlling the settings.....but I really don't think he's learned how to do that.

He really needs a DSLR. Even a 5-year-old DSLR, which could probably be had for a song in a private sale, would really help him a lot with the image quality issues. It would also make it more straightforward to control settings. On most P&S cameras, the manufacturers don't make it easy to shoot manual exposure, because they assume that most users can't be bothered to learn.

Mgoldman 04-05-2019 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 195384)
Huh? He'll want to increase the ISO substantially so he can use a faster shutter speed to control the blown out headlights. ISO 200 in low light just means he'd have to counter that with a slower shutter speed resulting in the headlights being blown out even more.

Wait, what?!? That's like saying you'll use more gas if you drive slower because you'll be driving longer. Granted, it's true you may save gas driving slower (less air drag), I do not think the same can be said with exposures. The headlights, being so much brighter than the rest of the scene, will always be that much brighter regardless of whether you expose for a long time with a low ISO or a short time with a high ISO. The same amount of light is hitting the sensor.

For a scene such as that - you need to find an angle where the headlights do not shine directly into the lens. Or, significantly underexpose (ie; expose for the headlights) and then hope you can bring back the detail in shadow recovery. This is where having a good camera comes into play - you can shoot what you want vs only what your camera allows. Now - "good camera" does not mean expensive camera. Just look for a camera with good dynamic range.

With Nikon and Sony you can "push" or underexpose by several stops and then brighten the underexposed part of the image without much added noise. Cameras with poor dynamic range, like Canon... well, just don't take photos like that. Still, though far from perfect, Canon does have a feature (camera setting) that helps protect highlights (bright spots) and is certainly nice to have. No doubt Sony, Nikon and others have that. Check to see if your camera does. If so, it might help.

/Mitch

spacetrain1983 04-07-2019 12:06 AM

The SX530HS has manual settings, however I wasn't going to fiddle with them when, even under a raincoat, the camera was getting soaked. I do have shots from the sequence with headlights that aren't blown out, but at the expense of raindrops on the lens being visible in the image.

JimThias 04-07-2019 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mgoldman (Post 195386)

For a scene such as that - you need to find an angle where the headlights do not shine directly into the lens. Or, significantly underexpose (ie; expose for the headlights) and then hope you can bring back the detail in shadow recovery.

That's kind of what I was implying. Rob was suggesting he go slower with the ISO, which would result in having to go even slower with the shutter speed. And if the train is moving he's just going to have motion blur. If he increases the ISO 2-3 stops, allowing for a faster shutter speed to control the motion blur, he'll have wiggle room to underexpose. But yeah, the best bet is to shoot at an angle where the headlight isn't pointing directly at the camera lens.


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