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-   -   Memory Card Corrupted (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=5249)

Carl Becker 05-10-2007 02:56 AM

Memory Card Corrupted
 
Louis, my dad, just contacted me with a question for the RP forums. He took a few photos, then started to look through them, and received a message saying something like "corrupt data" and all the images weren't appearing. :-(

He is going to format the card since he only has one other card and he already filled it up (it's a really small card). When he does this, I'm assuming that the images that were on there are lost?

Also, once he formats the card, can we trust that it will work properly? How often should we format our cards?

Mark Rosnick 05-10-2007 03:17 AM

Corrupted cards
 
I had that happen to me just 2 weeks ago. I was shooting and tried to review my images, and it said unable to view image. I reformatted the card, and knock wood..it's working ok now. I usually burn CDs whenever my cards get fairly full, then I reformat them right away. Unfortunately he will loose the images on the card. If your dad can, see if he can burn a CD before he reformats the card. Good luck

JRMDC 05-10-2007 10:25 AM

There are programs out there that can try to recover the files, if you can hook the card up to a computer with a card reader. Sorry but I don't remember any specific names.

Carl Becker 05-10-2007 12:50 PM

Thanks for the comments. He probably would have waited to format the card but he was along a busy line and needed a place for more photos. He said losing the few he already had was worth it since he was going to be able to do better.

Any recommendations on how often to format cards?

jfusaro 05-10-2007 01:01 PM

i reformat a card every time i download the images to my computer.

i have done it this way since going digital back in 2003.

no problems with compact flash cards or memory sticks, so far...

JRMDC 05-10-2007 01:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jfusaro
i reformat a card every time i download the images to my computer.

I do the same. I do the reformatting in the camera, not while the card is connected to the computer through a card reader.

Ween 05-10-2007 02:04 PM

Here's a whole thread on formatting cards and how often people do it (it's also the famous Mike B "no cameras on their sides" thread :lol: ):

http://www.railpictures.net/forums/s...ghlight=format

a231pacific 05-10-2007 02:49 PM

From NatureScapes.Net:
Quote:

In my opinion, all digital photographers should have the program PhotoRescue (www.datarescue.com/photorescue). The latest incarnation of this program is version 2.0 Build 657. It is the most comprehensive program on the market for rebuilding image files as it recognizes all current digital photograph file types. The program can be purchased online with a current cost of $29.00 which includes one year of updates.
Quote:

Most importantly, stop using the card immediately as soon as you realize something is wrong. By preventing further writing to the card, you wonít be further damaging whatís already on the card. Upon realizing youíve just formatted a card with photos you still need to access, donít worry; the pictures are still there, only the file allocation table has been erased. But if you start using the card, you are likely to lose some of the images as they will be overwritten by new ones. Even if this should happen, only the photos that were overwritten are no longer available; the others are still salvageable.
A friend of mine had this happen while out shooting plows this winter, probably caused by dry snow getting into the camera and then thawing once he got back in the car. He reformated the card and took some more pictures, but fortunately he asked for help that night and we were able to save about 90% of his shots. The program works on PC and MAC's.

Michael Allen

ken45 05-10-2007 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ween
Here's a whole thread on formatting cards and how often people do it (it's also the famous Mike B "no cameras on their sides" thread :lol: ):

http://www.railpictures.net/forums/s...ghlight=format

It was also the Andrew doesn't shoot RAW's thread. What a classic!

Carl Becker 05-10-2007 08:53 PM

Good News
 
Somehow, when he went to format the card, it said that there was an error. He tried it again a few times, and received the same message. The next time he turned it on, the card was working again, and all of the images were there again!

What can cause this? Should he continue to use it for images until we can format it with the computer?

Thanks!

JRMDC 05-10-2007 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carl Becker
Somehow, when he went to format the card, it said that there was an error. He tried it again a few times, and received the same message. The next time he turned it on, the card was working again, and all of the images were there again!

What can cause this? Should he continue to use it for images until we can format it with the computer?

Thanks!

Well, it could be any of a number of things, including simply a loose or bad connection between card and camera. Obviously, if you can, don't use it until you download.

Regarding your last sentence, I strongly advise, based on what I have read a zillion times in various forums, that when he does get to reformatting, that he do it in-camera and not with a computer.

JimThias 05-11-2007 01:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ween
Here's a whole thread on formatting cards and how often people do it (it's also the famous Mike B "no cameras on their sides" thread :lol: ):

Damn you! I was JUST about to make a joke about that. :-P

Mike B. 05-11-2007 06:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ween
Here's a whole thread on formatting cards and how often people do it (it's also the famous Mike B "no cameras on their sides" thread :lol: ):

http://www.railpictures.net/forums/s...ghlight=format

Ohhh man...

Carl Becker 05-11-2007 01:58 PM

I'm not trying to beat a dead horse, but my camera sits on its side in the bag. :D

John Craft 05-11-2007 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carl Becker
I'm not trying to beat a dead horse, but my camera sits on its side in the bag. :D


That's just weird. Pathetic, even.

Everyone knows that the pixels drain to the side when you do that. You end up having to shake the camera before you use it.

Personally, I put my lens on, and hold the whole thing pointing down for about 5 minutes before I shoot. That way, the pixels are closer to the front lens element.

I find that this not only increases the saturation of the image, because the pixels are closer to the light, but also the focal length of the shot. In fact, if you hold it pointing down for 30 minutes, you can shoot a telephoto with your wide-angle lens.

Ween 05-11-2007 08:09 PM

Bwa ha ha ha ha ha ha!!!

This isn't simply beating a dead horse, this is going to the horse cemetary, exhuming the rotted carcass, and then flogging away.

It's still funny though...:lol:

JRMDC 05-11-2007 08:21 PM

This is insane. I've had about enough of these ill-thought speculations. Look, everybody, come on! The point of pixels is to capture light. Where is the most light, in the sky or on the ground? Which is brighter? The sky, of course.

So where do you need pixels? You need them at the bottom, where there is less light so you need more pixels to efficiently capture what is there.

So what you do is you place your camera in the bag with the lens facing horizontally and the bottom of the camera down. The pixels shift down to the bottom of the sensor, just like pulp in juice. This is no different than exposing to the right on the histogram. You choose your exposure setting and storage process in order to maximize the amount of light captured. It's all about the light!

Few realize this or have thought about it because it has always been natural to store a camera this way anyway. And for that matter, that is how a camera sits when suspended from a neck strap and on your chest. I believe even old Ansel stored his glass plates in a vertical position with the edge that would become the bottom of the image pointing down. Now you know why this natural process has been so effective.

Now, if you are planning to shoot verticals, obviously you have to put your camera in the bag rotated 90 degrees. The problem, of course, is that you have to be consistent in which way you hold the camera when you shoot the vertical; if you flip it around coming out of the bag, you will have quite a dark bottom of the picture as all the pixels shifted toward the edge that became sky.

This vertical issue doesn't arise in RR photography too often because it is so natural, a genetic inheritance almost, to shoot the landscape-orientation wedgie shot. And because so many of us are hobbyists. So no one notices. I assure you that professional portrait photographers have worked all the nuances of this out in detail.

I can't believe you guys hadn't already figured this out. Well, some of you obviously had, judging by the quality of your pictures, but it must have been subconscious, as there has been no discussion of this important aspect of photography here. And, of course, because for other reasons it has always been natural to store and hold a camera base-side down. Forturnately, I am here to inform one and all.

I accept your gratitude in advance.

J

John Craft 05-11-2007 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JRMDC
So where do you need pixels? You need them at the bottom, where there is less light so you need more pixels to efficiently capture what is there.

So what you do is you place your camera in the bag with the lens facing horizontally and the bottom of the camera down. The pixels shift down to the bottom of the sensor, just like pulp in juice. This is no different than exposing to the right on the histogram. You choose your exposure setting and storage process in order to maximize the amount of light captured. It's all about the light!

JRMDC is wise in the ways of science.

http://www.intriguing.com/mp/_pictur...lyGrail026.jpg

http://www.intriguing.com/mp/_pictur...lyGrail027.jpg

http://www.intriguing.com/mp/_pictur...lyGrail031.jpg

SD70MACMAN 05-11-2007 10:02 PM

:lol:

So THATS why my sky always turns out so crappy. Thanks for explaining Janusz. But now you've got me worried. My hard drive spins really fast, do you know if that effects anything? Maybe like blood in a centrifuge?

I just read over that camera upright thing. Gave me a good laugh. Sorry it was brought up Mike, but good times, good times. :twisted:

JimThias 05-11-2007 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Craft
JRMDC is wise in the ways of science.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

(I think I'll change my forum name to Roger The Shrubber. :lol: )

JRMDC 05-12-2007 12:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Craft
JRMDC is wise in the ways of science.

Hmm, that yellow nose in the first picture looks mighty familiar...

Mark Rosnick 05-12-2007 12:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias
:lol: :lol: :lol:

(I think I'll change my forum name to Roger The Shrubber. :lol: )

Now is it time to "Bring out your dead(forum topics?)

JRMDC 05-12-2007 12:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark Rosnick
Now is it time to "Bring out your dead(forum topics?)

Time for someone to revive the "Dead Space" thread? :-D

Switched out 05-13-2007 03:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Craft
That's just weird. Pathetic, even.

Everyone knows that the pixels drain to the side when you do that. You end up having to shake the camera before you use it.

Nooooooooo don't shake the camera!!!! it's bad for the memory card.

Memory cards are like an "etch a sketch" if you shake them to hard all the captured pixels get jumbled up.

Christine.


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