Thread: Cameras
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Old 06-19-2017, 10:44 PM   #15
KevinM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC View Post
I think you are wrong about this. Hard for me to remember, but I think one scrolls through the focus points with the top roller. It seems easy enough. If one has a body with 60+ focus points, on the other hand, that would be cumbersome. I don't know how those bodies are set up.
It may be that you can change the focus point with the back wheel on a Canon, but unlike the Nikon joystick, you can't go up/down as well as right/left. You can only scroll through the points in order until you reach the one you want. The Nikon system allows you to move the red rectangle (focus designator) directly to where you want it with a minimum of wasted effort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC View Post
Perhaps you are using the terms "big wheel" and "thumbwheel" differently than I do, or the language is different in Nikon land. I control the shutter with my thumb on the back wheel and aperture with the (smaller) top roller and my index finger.
Yes, it is the "back wheel" on the Canons that I both like and dislike. I like the ability to quickly review photos already captured by simply spinning that wheel. I don't like the idea of either controlling shutter speed or the focus point position with it.

The Nikons have two thumbwheels which are position so you roll them horizontally (not vertically). One is at the top of the grip in the front, and controls aperture, typically with the forefinger. The other is on the back at the top right, and controls shutter speed, typically with the thumb. Physically, the two thumbwheels are identical. In addition, there is a "joystick" button on the back of the camera to the right of the LCD. Depressing the edges of that joystick is used for manipulating focus points up, down, right or left. It is also used for reviewing photos, but it requires a separate keystroke to move from frame to frame. If you have 300 frames to look at, finding number 120 is a bit of a PITA. It's the only feature that Nikon really needs to improve.
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