Old 12-09-2009, 04:31 AM   #26
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Exposure correction is easily fixed when shooting in RAW. I suppose it is rather easy to adjust exposure when using JPEG as well, but I prefer the exposure control on Camrea Raw 5.0 on CS4.

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Old 12-09-2009, 12:11 PM   #27
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I was changing lenses in the field a lot, I was missing shots and I ended up with lots of pictures that had dust spots on them. I love my 18-200mm VR because neither happens now.
The D90 and D5000 both have dust reduction, so that will not be an issue. Whether or not this photographer will need to change lenses a lot will be up to him, however.
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Old 12-09-2009, 12:16 PM   #28
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I'm not sure how the D90 has "a tendency to overexpose." We all shoot in MANUAL EXPOSURE MODE.....don't we?
Kevin:

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Originally Posted by DPReview
In spite of its impressive highlight dynamic range, it's a camera that you have to keep an eye on, as its keenness to correctly expose what it thinks is the subject of your photo sometimes means letting highlights clip (matrix metering is very strongly associated with the selected AF point). There is an option to fine-tune the metering in 1/6 EV steps if you aren't the kind of photographer who wants to keep tabs on what the camera is doing.
For an introductory user who may or may not be willing to monitor the exposure, the D5000, which apparently does not have this issue, is IMO the better fit.

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Old 12-09-2009, 12:23 PM   #29
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1. The D5000 kit with two lenses, an 18-55mm VR and a 55-200mm VR ($864.95):

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-Digital-.../dp/tech-data/
HOLD IT! That deal includes the 55-200 that is NOT stabilized. Should be this one instead:

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-Digital-...364931&sr=1-12

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Old 12-09-2009, 01:26 PM   #30
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The D90 and D5000 both have dust reduction, so that will not be an issue. Whether or not this photographer will need to change lenses a lot will be up to him, however.
Hi Carl,

Yes, all newer cameras have some sort of dust reduction function, but they all have some significant limitations. Nearly all cameras have some sort of low-pass filter in front of the sensor. It's basically a clear piece of glass. That's where the dust and other contaminants can accumulate....not on the sensor itself. In the case of the Nikons, activation of the dust reduction system essentially vibrates that low-pass filter, which shakes off any loose particles. "Loose particles" is the operative phrase. Theoretically it will remove most of the contaminants that you could remove yourself with a "rocket blower" or similar device. While the system is proprietary, I'm guessing that Nikon is using a piezoelectric crystal to cause the vibrations. Anyway, anything that is not loose...sticky things like pollen particles...will likely not respond to this dust reduction system....or that rocket blower. Those would have to be removed by the photographer using techniques that the manufacturers do not approve of, or by a professional camera shop.

None of our cameras are hermetically sealed. Dust can enter them in a number of ways. The predominant way however, is still the exchange of lenses, particularly in an uncontrolled environment....like outdoors. As one who has experienced the problem, I would caution any photographer who is going to need to change lenses frequently, that it should be done in the most controlled fashion possible. Do it in the car, with the doors closed. Keep the camera body pointed downward. Blow off the mount and rear element before attaching the new lens.

BTW, here is what Nikon has to say on the subject:
Special care should be taken when changing lenses in order to avoid the possibility of dirt or dust entering the camera. Once inside the camera, foreign matter may adhere to the low-pass filter and show up in photographs. To help prevent the appearance of these artifacts in photographs Nikon has created the Comprehensive Dust Reduction System. This system uses a series of high resonance frequencies to vibrate the optical low-pass filter. This dislodges dust on the front of the sensor and reduces dust spots appearing on images. This system combined with the existing Image Dust Off system in Capture NX 2 provides a full dust prevention system for photographers.
Capture NX2 is Nikon's postprocessing software and is not included in the purchase of the camera.

On charters etc., where there are lots of railroad photographers, it has been my observation that most folks who use a second lens frequently seem to solve (avoid) the problem by sticking it on a second body.
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Old 12-09-2009, 01:36 PM   #31
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On the other hand, I have been shooting for years, have never cleaned the camera except with a rocket blower, and have had no problems. So, from my very limited sample of one, I draw the preliminary conclusion that people worry too much about dust, and especially about sticky dust.

Seriously, I am curious, how often do people here find the need to clean their sensors with something other than a blower?

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None of our cameras are hermetically sealed. Dust can enter them in a number of ways. The predominant way however, is still the exchange of lenses, particularly in an uncontrolled environment....like outdoors. As one who has experienced the problem, I would caution any photographer who is going to need to change lenses frequently, that it should be done in the most controlled fashion possible. Do it in the car, with the doors closed. Keep the camera body pointed downward. Blow off the mount and rear element before attaching the new lens.
I agree to some extent. But in the car? You go back to the car when you need to change lenses? No way, I'm out there to shoot, not to wander back and forth to the car. BTW, I suspect that the air in the car is no cleaner than the air outside (just look at the dust accumulated on my dashboard!), so the car only helps you if it is very windy outside.

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On charters etc., where there are lots of railroad photographers, it has been my observation that most folks who use a second lens frequently seem to solve (avoid) the problem by sticking it on a second body.
We don't do the same charters!
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Old 12-09-2009, 01:43 PM   #32
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HOLD IT! That deal includes the 55-200 that is NOT stabilized. Should be this one instead:

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-Digital-...364931&sr=1-12

~Carl Becker
Again, and I don't want to knock Cameta, I have a vague recollection that they are ok, but you don't necessarily need the extras. Instead of paying 890, you can pay 800 at B&H (thru 12/12)

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...LR_Camera.html

Now, the Cameta offer doesn't look that bad, for 90 more you get an extra battery, a memory card, a case, a card reader, and some DVDs. Might be worth it. I didn't think it was worth 155 on the other deal but here it might be OK.
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Old 12-09-2009, 01:57 PM   #33
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Hi Carl,

Yes, all newer cameras have some sort of dust reduction function, but they all have some significant limitations. Nearly all cameras have some sort of low-pass filter in front of the sensor. It's basically a clear piece of glass. That's where the dust and other contaminants can accumulate....not on the sensor itself. In the case of the Nikons, activation of the dust reduction system essentially vibrates that low-pass filter, which shakes off any loose particles. "Loose particles" is the operative phrase. Theoretically it will remove most of the contaminants that you could remove yourself with a "rocket blower" or similar device. While the system is proprietary, I'm guessing that Nikon is using a piezoelectric crystal to cause the vibrations. Anyway, anything that is not loose...sticky things like pollen particles...will likely not respond to this dust reduction system....or that rocket blower. Those would have to be removed by the photographer using techniques that the manufacturers do not approve of, or by a professional camera shop.

None of our cameras are hermetically sealed. Dust can enter them in a number of ways. The predominant way however, is still the exchange of lenses, particularly in an uncontrolled environment....like outdoors. As one who has experienced the problem, I would caution any photographer who is going to need to change lenses frequently, that it should be done in the most controlled fashion possible. Do it in the car, with the doors closed. Keep the camera body pointed downward. Blow off the mount and rear element before attaching the new lens.

BTW, here is what Nikon has to say on the subject:
Special care should be taken when changing lenses in order to avoid the possibility of dirt or dust entering the camera. Once inside the camera, foreign matter may adhere to the low-pass filter and show up in photographs. To help prevent the appearance of these artifacts in photographs Nikon has created the Comprehensive Dust Reduction System. This system uses a series of high resonance frequencies to vibrate the optical low-pass filter. This dislodges dust on the front of the sensor and reduces dust spots appearing on images. This system combined with the existing Image Dust Off system in Capture NX 2 provides a full dust prevention system for photographers.

With that being said, I'm at the ten month mark with my D300 regularly switching between three lenses and have not had a single dust problem to date.
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Old 12-09-2009, 02:09 PM   #34
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On the other hand, I have been shooting for years, have never cleaned the camera except with a rocket blower, and have had no problems. So, from my very limited sample of one, I draw the preliminary conclusion that people worry too much about dust, and especially about sticky dust.
Hi J,

I believe you shoot Canons, correct? That may explain it. If the early Nikons had an Achilles Heel, it was in the dust control area. I read someplace that Canons had a larger gap between the LP Filter and the sensor itself than Nikons. If true, that gap may result in dust particles being less noticeable. I can only speak for my Nikon D40x. I used to change lenses in the field...not in windy or dusty conditions either....and I did get dust. It got to the point where before every shoot, I would take a picture of the sky at a high f-stop and then examine it at high magnification for spots. I would then blow off the sensor and do it again until I got a clean picture.

When I bought the D90 body, I put the 18-200mm lens on it and basically left it. A very well-known rail photog had done the same thing with his D200 and gave me that advice. He said he'd never had a problem, and I haven't since either.

As for the charters, I have noticed that a lot...certainly not all....of Nikon shooters have either have one camera/lens combo they use all the time, or they carry a second camera. The D200/300 series cameras seem to be the most popular and the 18-200mm VR lens seems to be on most of them.
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Old 12-09-2009, 02:25 PM   #35
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As for the charters, I have noticed that a lot...certainly not all....of Nikon shooters have either have one camera/lens combo they use all the time, or they carry a second camera. The D200/300 series cameras seem to be the most popular and the 18-200mm VR lens seems to be on most of them.
Nikon shooters must be wealthier than Canon shooters.

I do look forward to the day that I can have two bodies at one time. As it goes, since I am holding on to my 20D so long, it will no longer be worth selling it to fund the next body so I might end up with two after all! Street value under $300 now and continuing to fall.

Or I might end up with the 20D for a long, long, long time.
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Old 12-10-2009, 01:02 AM   #36
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Again, and I don't want to knock Cameta, I have a vague recollection that they are ok, but you don't necessarily need the extras.
http://www.bbb.org/new-york-city/bus...ville-ny-18367

Quote:
Instead of paying 890, you can pay 800 at B&H (thru 12/12)

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...LR_Camera.html
Well, if he wants to get the camera any time soon though, the fine print will need to be read. See attachment.

Quote:
Now, the Cameta offer doesn't look that bad, for 90 more you get an extra battery, a memory card, a case, a card reader, and some DVDs. Might be worth it. I didn't think it was worth 155 on the other deal but here it might be OK.
I agree; note however that the DVDs will come from Nikon whether or not you buy the Cameta package, but in this case buying the default package is hardly worth it with the Cameta one being barely any more (it's $849 if it won't let you see the price):

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...X0DER&v=glance

I'd personally go with one of the Amazon/Cameta packages with the two VR lenses (one comes with an 8 GB card and the other 16 - not much of a difference overall).

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Old 12-10-2009, 01:36 AM   #37
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BBB is hard to assess, reseller ratings is a bit easier

http://www.resellerratings.com/store/CametaCamera
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Old 12-10-2009, 02:52 AM   #38
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At this point, it looks like I'll be getting the two-lens deal from Cameta:

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-Digital-...364931&sr=1-12

Before I do, though, any last suggestions from anyone else out there?
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Old 12-11-2009, 01:45 AM   #39
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Good choice. My final thought would be to get a good DX prime lens to go along with it. (If you buy a non-DX lens, you won't get AF on the D5000.)

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Old 12-11-2009, 02:08 AM   #40
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Keep in mind that a DX lense is designed to be used with a crop sensor type camera. They don't work too well with full frame sensor or 35mm camera. That was my mistake on a couple of lenses when I upgraded to a full frame sensor body. So If you're planning to upgrade in the future, you may want to keep that in consideration. Just a thought.

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Old 12-11-2009, 02:15 AM   #41
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Something else to consider, is some camera bodies have an internal motor drive to run the auto focus on the lense if the the lense is not motorized.

I suspect the D90 has a motor while the D5000 does not. Thus, the D90 will run any Nikon lense, while the D5000 will have to be focused manually if the the lense is not motorized.

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Old 12-11-2009, 02:23 AM   #42
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Something else to consider, is some camera bodies have an internal motor drive to run the auto focus on the lense if the the lense is not motorized.

I suspect the D90 has a motor while the D5000 does not. Thus, the D90 will run any Nikon lense, while the D5000 will have to be focused manually if the the lense is not motorized.
Just looked it up, correct, the D5000 does not have the auto-focus motor. Fascinating!

I've always found it interesting that Nikon, or Nikon-philes, used to argue that only Nikon had backward compatibility in lenses whereas Canon stranded FD owners when they came out with EOS. But the various generations of Nikon lenses have various idiosyncrasies preventing full and total compatibility, as it turns out (as I have read, I have never owned a Nikon) and it seems like this is a modern version of same.
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Old 12-11-2009, 02:40 AM   #43
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Just looked it up, correct, the D5000 does not have the auto-focus motor. Fascinating!

I've always found it interesting that Nikon, or Nikon-philes, used to argue that only Nikon had backward compatibility in lenses.
We're called Nikonians, J.

It is true that none of the low-end Nikon DSLRs have/had focusing motors. The D40/40x didn't and neither did the D60. The D3000 and D5000 are the replacements, and apparently don't either. That's not a huge disadvantage, as long as you stay with the AF-S lenses that have their own focusing motors. As you may recall from my previous post, I went with the D90 as my second body for several reasons, among them, the ability to use non-AF-S glass.

Another reason to think twice about the low-end Nikons is the focusing screen. It only took me a few months to get really sick of the 3-spot screen on the D40x.
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Old 12-11-2009, 12:18 PM   #44
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Another reason to think twice about the low-end Nikons is the focusing screen. It only took me a few months to get really sick of the 3-spot screen on the D40x.
Just to put this out there, the D5000, D3000, and D90 all have the same 11-point AF system. So nowadays there's no reason to put the D3000 out of the picture (no pun intended) because of it.

FWIW, the D3000 actually replaced the D60; there was no D40 replacement and the D5000 actually was considered a new "line."

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Old 12-11-2009, 04:37 PM   #45
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Just to put this out there, the D5000, D3000, and D90 all have the same 11-point AF system. So nowadays there's no reason to put the D3000 out of the picture (no pun intended) because of it.
According to the reviews I've seen, the D3000 is slower then the D5000, and the picture quality isn't as good either.
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Old 12-11-2009, 04:57 PM   #46
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D3000 just reviewed by dpreview

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0912/09...3000review.asp

Not following Nikon, I didn't even realize there are separate D3000 and D5000 cameras. The D3000 looks like a nice non-video entry level camera, two-lens kit (both VR) at Amazon (Beach) for $650. Something to think about, people have asked me for recommendations for the holidays.
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Old 12-12-2009, 01:02 AM   #47
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According to the reviews I've seen, the D3000 is slower then the D5000, and the picture quality isn't as good either.
Well, this is partially true. The biggest difference between the two is that the D5000 has the more typical 12 MP CMOS type sensor (also seen in the Nikon D90, Pentax K-X and Sony A500), while the D3000 contains the rather old 10 MP CCD sensor (seen in the Pentax K200D, K-M, Sony A100, A200, A300, A230, A330, Nikon D80, D40X and D60). This means that although shooting/processing is slower and high ISO performance obviously is not as good, the difference at base ISO (other than photo size) will be negligible.

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Old 12-12-2009, 01:09 AM   #48
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J,

The D3000 does look like a very decent introductory camera for someone can live w/o live view and movies. It's pretty much a D60 with a couple of things tacked on and/or improved:

Quote:
Nikon D3000 vs D60: Key Differences
The D3000 marks a fairly subtle upgrade to the aging but successful D60. Here are the stand-out specification differences:

Guide mode
11 AF points (MultiCAM 1000 autofocus system)
3D AF tracking
3.0 inch LCD (vs 2.7inch LCD in D60 - both 230,000 dots)
For someone who would want live view (and wouldn't mind a rather small viewfinder/grip) the Sony A330 looks like a decent alternative; while it does have some flaws the live view system is in a total different league and IS is built in. I'm not sure of a reason to buy the A230 over the D3000, on the other hand.

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Old 12-15-2009, 02:17 AM   #49
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I'd like to thank everyone for their feedback. I've purchased the D5000 with two lenses. Hopefully, it should be arriving soon.
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Old 12-15-2009, 11:57 PM   #50
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Let us know what you think when it arrives and you can try it out!
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