Old 04-12-2008, 08:44 PM   #1
murph_34a
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 17
Default Poor Image Quality Rejection Advice

I recently had this one rejected for poor image quality, I waited a while and took another look at it and I just don't see it.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...0&key=15255051

I'm not calling the screeners liars, I just wanted to get the advice of the forum because I'm sure there's something you all will see that I just don't know to look for. After all, I'm still learning. I have had this shot rejected for just about every fixable reason in the book, first undersharpened, then too much noise, then over sharpened (all of which I do see), so I started over from scratch and got the poor image quality. Any advice on how to fix it up or do I just move on? It's not too special of a shot, but it's one that I like so I'd like to get it on. Thanks for your help!

Here's the other rejections in case you wish to see...
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=710731229
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=508860&key=0
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=270431100
murph_34a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2008, 10:16 PM   #2
Joe the Photog
A dude with a camera
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,921
Default

Hi, Ryan;

Something seems off about the shot that I can't put my finger on. Is this a crop down from the original size I see you use the Rebel XT. What lens did you use? Can you share you EXIF data?


Joe
__________________
Joseph C. Hinson Photography
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2008, 11:41 PM   #3
Northern Limits
Senior Member
 
Northern Limits's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 611
Default

Low light, in this case early morning can cause things to look grainy/noisy. This one was also taken at ISO 400, therefore more noise issues.
Try starting with a noise reduction and white balance adjustment before other adjustments and sharpening.
__________________
Cheers, Jim.


Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!
Northern Limits is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2008, 11:55 PM   #4
ottergoose
American Gunzel
 
ottergoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Eagan, MN
Posts: 1,626
Send a message via AIM to ottergoose Send a message via Yahoo to ottergoose
Default

I agree w/ the advice already given.

ISO 400 + too much sharpening = bad times.
__________________
Nick Benson | Pictures | Website | Flickr | Profile | JetPhotos | Twitter
ottergoose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 02:03 AM   #5
Carl Becker
Senior Member
 
Carl Becker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,218
Default

For me, the problem spots are the smoke above the locomotive on the left as well as the foreground. The number boards on the right locomotive also seem a little weak...
Carl Becker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 02:36 AM   #6
Watain
-_-
 
Watain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Hiltons, Virginia, USA
Posts: 953
Send a message via MSN to Watain
Default

if you had the iso on 400 thats where your problem is im stil new to this myself and only have one photo on rp so far but i still know about cameras,the sky looks washed out as well looks like it was over exposed some probably due to the iso being too high turn the iso down to 200 turn your noise reduction on and set the shutter speed to 1/500 or to 1/1000 and your f/aperature to 5.6 and try it again and if you shoot in raw dont ive never had anything useable come from a raw file just shoot in the highest quality jpg setting and never use continuous shooting mode always use single shot just press the button over and over so it will be sharper on every shot because it gives the lens time to refocus on each shot i dont know what kind of camera you use but these should work on any DSLR

hope i was of some help
Watain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 02:47 AM   #7
Joe the Photog
A dude with a camera
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,921
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Watain
if you shoot in raw dont ive never had anything useable come from a raw file
That's actually bad advice. I know there are some fine photographers on this site who do NOT shoot in RAW (AB2 is the one that comes to mind first.) but I think most of the folks will tell you just the opposite -- DO shoot in RAW and that will help you out in the long run.

I suggest to anyone not shooting in RAW to at the very least shoot in the highest jpeg shooting and RAW at the same time. When you load the shots onto your computer, save the RAW files elsewhere if you're not ready to go that route. You can edit the jpegs and do what you will. In a few moths or years when you want to see what RAW can do, then you still have the RAW file.

Good Lord, I wish I had done this for the three years I ignored RAW on my 300D. Now with my new camera, I shoot RAW only and love the results.


Joe
__________________
Joseph C. Hinson Photography
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 02:54 AM   #8
Joe the Photog
A dude with a camera
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,921
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Watain
if you had the iso on 400 thats where your problem is ..... the sky looks washed out as well looks like it was over exposed some probably due to the iso being too high
400 ISO is pretty high for a sunny day shot and it will add to the noise factor especially on the Digital Rebels that you and I shoot with. I rarely shoot 400 for railroad photography, esp. stuff that I think might end up here, but noise reduction should help with that.

I'm not sure if the weak numberboard on the loco to the right is actually grain related, undersharped or out of focus.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Watain
turn the iso down to 200 turn your noise reduction on and set the shutter speed to 1/500 or to 1/1000 and your f/aperature to 5.6 and
Everyone has their home base positions, as I call them. I tend to start at ISO 100 at f8 and 1/500. The first thing I change when it needs changing is shuter speed, then if the light is still poor, I'll go down accordingly. I try not to change the ISO from 100 unless I have to. But get ten photographers in the room and I'm sure you'll hear fifteen different opinions on shooting.


Joe
__________________
Joseph C. Hinson Photography
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 02:59 AM   #9
Watain
-_-
 
Watain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Hiltons, Virginia, USA
Posts: 953
Send a message via MSN to Watain
Default

''That's actually bad advice. I know there are some fine photographers on this site who do NOT shoot in RAW (AB2 is the one that comes to mind first.) but I think most of the folks will tell you just the opposite -- DO shoot in RAW and that will help you out in the long run.''

well im not a canon user so its probably the difference in brands one thing about raw is how long the shots take to write to the card and you can only take so many was just my opinion on the matter
Watain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 03:08 AM   #10
Carl Becker
Senior Member
 
Carl Becker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,218
Default

Once the Russian hackers get their @$$es in gear and come up with a CHDK for the SX100, I can finally start shooting in RAW. I'm quite excited for the day to come, but I would like to take this opportunity to ask about freeware RAW processors. What ones are out there and would be recommended? It's one question I've never had a reason to ask before.

~Carl Becker
Carl Becker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 03:09 AM   #11
Carl Becker
Senior Member
 
Carl Becker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,218
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Watain
well im not a canon user so its probably the difference in brands one thing about raw is how long the shots take to write to the card and you can only take so many was just my opinion on the matter
What difference does the write time make, other than the fact that you might have to wait longer before taking another shot?

As long as you have a good sized SDHC (or even large SD, for that matter) card, you should be good to go. XD will be a bit slower, IIRC...
Carl Becker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 03:13 AM   #12
Joe the Photog
A dude with a camera
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,921
Default

Just to be clear, Ryan asked the initial question and the response told him not to shoot RAW. Ryan shoots with a Canon 350D according to the exif data on his accepted shots. The write time for a Digital Rebel is not that great. I can shoot a quick series of shots in all RAW and never tell the difference.

Now obviously all cameras have their differences and P&S cameras ight be a totally different thing altogether.


Joe
__________________
Joseph C. Hinson Photography
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.