Old 06-23-2017, 04:14 AM   #26
Pkwlsn
Member
 
Pkwlsn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 51
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich K View Post
Don't ignore cameras by Sony. I have used them for years. First was an A100. Now I use an A700 and an A77 and I have no complaints. I like the fact they have image stabilization built into the camera body, among other things. I read once that Nikon uses Sony sensors in some of their cameras.
I feel like people that have been shooting for years don't even consider Sony since they're already heavily invested in lenses with other systems. I'm my experience, it seems like it's mostly younger people who shoot Sony - or at least who shoot mirrorless. I personally shoot on an a6500 and couldn't be happier. The image quality and dynamic range is at the top of its class.
__________________
My Flickr
My RP.net
Pkwlsn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 12:38 PM   #27
troy12n
Senior Member
 
troy12n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,228
Default

Wasn't there a Sony camera that you can use Canon glass on?
__________________
My RP.net photos
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 12:40 PM   #28
RobJor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 382
Default

B & H Nikon D750 full frame with 24-120 F4, includes 64 GB MC, Shoulder Bag and a battery pack. $2296, free shipping and no tax outside NY and NJ. If you are conflicted about tax, in Illinois you can declare on your tax return to ease our states pain, not sure about other states. May be replaced soon but not sure of price drop has not already been factored in.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...mera_with.html

Bob Jordan
RobJor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 02:38 PM   #29
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,792
Default

The mirrorless cameras certainly have a significant advantage in terms of size and weight. For those who travel by plane and those who hike, it means you can take a lot with you in a fairly small bag. Another advantage is that the image you see in the EVF is the image you are going to get. It makes last second adjustments to exposure much easier to do than with a DSLR. You even get a histogram in the EVF in many cases.

All of that said, there are still some drawbacks. You have to like EVFs, and I personally still have not warmed up to them. I like seeing my subject vs. a video image of my subject. The selection of lenses is not yet as good for mirrorless as it is for DSLRs, although I assume it will catch up at some point. Lens cost appears to be about the same as for an equivalent DSLR lens. And lastly, battery life is an issue. You don't get nearly as many frames on a battery with a mirrorless camera as you do on a DSLR. A battery grip is almost a must for anyone doing any serious shooting. For folks who take just a few frames on each photo excursion, that's not an issue. For charter patrons like me that shoot 800-1000 frames a day or more, you'd better have several batteries with you.
__________________
/Kevin

My stuff is here.

Yeah, I do Flickr too. Tons of non-RP stuff there.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 07:30 PM   #30
Pkwlsn
Member
 
Pkwlsn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 51
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
Wasn't there a Sony camera that you can use Canon glass on?
You can use Canon or Nikon glass on pretty much every Sony mirrorless - just as long as you have a decent adapter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM View Post
The mirrorless cameras certainly have a significant advantage in terms of size and weight. For those who travel by plane and those who hike, it means you can take a lot with you in a fairly small bag. Another advantage is that the image you see in the EVF is the image you are going to get. It makes last second adjustments to exposure much easier to do than with a DSLR. You even get a histogram in the EVF in many cases.

All of that said, there are still some drawbacks. You have to like EVFs, and I personally still have not warmed up to them. I like seeing my subject vs. a video image of my subject. The selection of lenses is not yet as good for mirrorless as it is for DSLRs, although I assume it will catch up at some point. Lens cost appears to be about the same as for an equivalent DSLR lens. And lastly, battery life is an issue. You don't get nearly as many frames on a battery with a mirrorless camera as you do on a DSLR. A battery grip is almost a must for anyone doing any serious shooting. For folks who take just a few frames on each photo excursion, that's not an issue. For charter patrons like me that shoot 800-1000 frames a day or more, you'd better have several batteries with you.
Size and weight is the biggest advantage for me. I can carry my camera, an 18-105mm, a 55-210mm, a 12mm, a 35mm, a 50mm, filters, batteries, and also a tripod in a sling bag and have the whole thing weighs only a few pounds. This fits everything I need which means I'm never wishing I had brought something else along.
EVFs have come a long ways in the last couple of years. The refresh rates on the latest ones are incredibly high and the resolution is higher than the eye can see in such a small space. I can certainly understand why some people don't like using them though - especially if you've used a proper optical viewfinder your whole life. The biggest advantage to them is that it pretty much makes metering a thing of the past. You can see your exact exposure in real time, so making adjustments is effortless.
Lens selection definitely isn't anywhere close to the availability that DSLRs have. But that will come with time, hopefully. The ability to adapt any lens that isn't natively available is really nice though.
Batteries are definitely a big drawback. I'm not familiar with Fuji's batteries, but Sony's are especially bad. I usually get around 300-400 shots on one battery. I always have 4 extra batteries in my bag. That's probably overkill though as even with a full day of shooting at the Nevada Northern this last February I only went through two and a half batteries - and that was in the freezing cold. Battery grips are an option, of course, but they you negate the size benefit of having a mirrorless. Luckily the batteries are really small and are easy to pack around in my bag. The latest Sony A9 seems to have remedied this issue to some extent though. The new Sony battery is a little bigger in size but lasts over twice as long. Still, I think that mirrorless will never have the battery life that DSLRs have just from the fact that the sensor is always on.
__________________
My Flickr
My RP.net
Pkwlsn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2017, 09:12 PM   #31
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,652
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
I don't know if it's like this on all the new Canon camera bodies, but I like the fact that you have to press a button to change "mode" now...
Now? My ancient 60Ds have that feature.
__________________
.
Rhymes with slice, rice and mice, and probably should be spelled like "Tice."

This pretty much sums it up: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Thias
JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2017, 09:38 PM   #32
troy12n
Senior Member
 
troy12n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,228
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias View Post
Now? My ancient 60Ds have that feature.
Well, my newest body until a month ago was a 40D, so...
__________________
My RP.net photos
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.