Old 01-30-2014, 04:11 PM   #1
ShortlinesUSA
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Default FEC going to GE road fleet

I've refrained from posting anything on this topic, because it has been so rife with rumor and hearsay. But with an official release, I believe this one is coming to pass:

http://www.railresource.com/content/?p=7144

Note these are C4s, not the dual-fuel LNGs which have been discussed. GE has had little success attracting orders for this model (the middle axle on each truck is not powered), and they are Tier III, which will be obsolete for new locomotives at the end of this year. That adds up to "fire sale" in some minds.

Either way, looks like 2014 will be a year of big change for the FEC.
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:15 PM   #2
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Default C4's

While not widely operated, BNSF has something like 600 of these on order / in service. As with their large initial order of SD70MAC's perhaps other carriers are looking at how these units work out (reliability of the 4 raction motors and center axle mechanism / wheel wear) before purchasing.

These 4-motor units make sense for FEC which would have little need for modern 6-motor units on their essentially-flat railroad.
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Old 04-13-2017, 06:13 PM   #3
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This was a model developed at the behest of BNSF, in order to get a reduced cost AC traction unit for non-coal service (primarily intermodal) where AC traction 6 axles are unnecessary overkill. FEC has long ordered units using specifications of larger roads in order to keep their prices down, and being a pretty flat operation the A-1-A arranged AC traction engines were a perfect fit.

As for GE having "little success" with this product, BNSF bought (between ES44C4s and ET44C4s) a total of 1,465 units so far - you can count on the ET44C4 to be the lion's share of future orders too. It's one of the main reasons GE's new factory capacity was built in Fort Worth, TX. So much for the "little success" GE has attracting orders for this model.
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Old 04-20-2017, 06:29 PM   #4
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Yeah, just a bit can change over a few years, but BNSF is still the only Class 1 enamored with this traction motor arrangement. A friend in the shop at Topeka calls them the "clown wheel" configuration...
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:01 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xBNSFer View Post
This was a model developed at the behest of BNSF, in order to get a reduced cost AC traction unit for non-coal service (primarily intermodal) where AC traction 6 axles are unnecessary overkill. FEC has long ordered units using specifications of larger roads in order to keep their prices down, and being a pretty flat operation the A-1-A arranged AC traction engines were a perfect fit.

As for GE having "little success" with this product, BNSF bought (between ES44C4s and ET44C4s) a total of 1,465 units so far - you can count on the ET44C4 to be the lion's share of future orders too. It's one of the main reasons GE's new factory capacity was built in Fort Worth, TX. So much for the "little success" GE has attracting orders for this model.
Someone should explain to the Power Desk what they are for...
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:47 AM   #6
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Several NS crews on the branches off the pokey and Clinch valley last year quickly discovered what they weren't good for..

Loyd L.
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Old 04-29-2017, 04:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Someone should explain to the Power Desk what they are for...
Yeah unfortunately the Power Desk often uses a "hp/ton" application without consideration of such "other" factors.
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Old 05-15-2017, 07:41 PM   #8
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They are not very popular with the crews that get them on heavy trains...

I never understood how much money could really be saved just be eliminating a traction motor... makes no sense to me
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