Old 08-08-2011, 01:49 AM   #1
Mgoldman
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I am continuing an ongoing project capturing historic stations along the NEC and thought I had captured this one at Prospect Park quite well.

A little bit of insight, most captures along the electrified corridor I have found quite difficult due to some locations getting their best light mid-day and other locations wrought with distracting shadows from cantenary poles, wires and line side 100 year old trees. Now add 4 tracks, a preference for not cutting off parts of a scene (poles) and squeezing in a station and train in RP's aspect ratio and it's quite an uphill battle. Browse RP, you won't find many NEC stations at all, a loss in my opinion.

Back to Prospect Park /Moore Station - I thought this worked well. The light was best later in the day, the catenary poles are not cut off and I captured the train and station using the required aspect ratio. Typically, the train will block the view of the station or be too far away.

So - I welcome, as always, a constructive critique and wonder if there is a more RPesque way to capture this historic 1910 PRR survivor with inclusion of the SEPTA train.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=955532&key=0

/Mitch
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Old 08-08-2011, 01:52 AM   #2
troy12n
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Not a fan.

The fence and the caternary make it not very appealing at all, and quite honestly what made you want to shoot it from such a straight-on angle?
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Old 08-08-2011, 01:55 AM   #3
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A side note, the pictured station was built by the PRR and replaced the station built by the Philadephia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad. The reason the station is called Prospect Park /Moore Station is due to an agreement with the original land /station owner who insisted the family name carry through.

Interesting history, I thought. The original station was built when the right of way was two track and there were posts to tie horses to, a freight house that accepted sheep and the cost to ride to Philadelphia then was .38 cent. But you probably already knew that.

/Mitch
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Old 08-08-2011, 01:59 AM   #4
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Default I like it!

This is precisely the angle I would have shot it at. You just can't please everyone, I guess.
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:08 AM   #5
Mgoldman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
Not a fan.

The fence and the caternary make it not very appealing at all, and quite honestly what made you want to shoot it from such a straight-on angle?
Thanks, Troy.
I appreciate your opinion.

The fence and caternary are what they are. They exist at every depot along the corridor. Consequently, they are a natural part of nearly every depot scene along the corridor.

One thought is to accept this and another route would be to pretend most, if not all, stations simply do not exist. A sad fact that many have done and perhaps the reason so few photos of both depot and train, both past and present along the Corridor exist.

Why so head on? Shooting from the side would mean hiding the station behind the train (then you just have a train picture). Shooting more of a 3/4 meant cutting off the canternary poles and possibly part of the train or depot. I took such shots but cropped they would not fit RP's aspect ratio and I do not find them appealing to view otherwise.

/Mitch
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:09 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Terry View Post
This is precisely the angle I would have shot it at. You just can't please everyone, I guess.
What do you know... you only have your own column in Railfan and Railroad.

Thanks Jeff!

/Mitch
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:19 AM   #7
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I like it.
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:28 AM   #8
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I could take it or leave it. The composition short changed both subjects IMO.

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Old 08-08-2011, 03:07 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbassloyd View Post
I could take it or leave it. The composition short changed both subjects IMO.

Loyd L.
I hear ya, Loyd. Though - I actually like the shot, I did not submit it hoping for rave reviews nor a PC. Based on my impression that RP accepts more then just the best railroad photos on the 'net, (which is a plus for all who frequent RP for research, news and discovery), I figured it had, along with an interesting and informative caption, at least some appeal compared to yet another generic diesel wedge captured in a yard or along some nondescript location.

Can you envision a way both the SEPTA train (which is always on the outside track) and the historic depot could be captured in a way RP would accept? I have a photo with Amtrak on the inside track that shows more of a side view but the train had to be captured further back yet covering more of the station detail. I shot at 10 mm but a good portion will likely be lost to perspective correction. I'll get to it eventually. The SEPTA shot just jumped out at me first and in an appealing way.

/Mitch

Last edited by Mgoldman; 08-08-2011 at 03:18 AM.
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Old 08-08-2011, 03:22 AM   #10
Ron Flanary
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Mitch,
I like it just fine. The wide angle distortion is to be expected, and I'm not sure how you would frame this shot and make it any more visually appealing. If they don't accept it...I wouldn't sweat it.

Ron
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Old 08-08-2011, 03:28 AM   #11
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It's inconsistent (no surprise to you, Mitch! it's your favorite RP forums word!) but RP does have a bias, from time to time at least, against an "up" angle. And the nose could be considered a bit too "in your face". The next earlier frame may have or will do the trick.

A stepladder also comes to mind, you would get the fenceline a lot lower.

In the forum tradition, I hereby provide a link to my own shot. In this case I did elevate myself substantially to improve the view over the obstructing fence, getting it to almost clear the engine trucks. I was on top of the roof covering the descent into the pedestrian tunnel.

Image © Janusz Mrozek
PhotoID: 298886
Photograph © Janusz Mrozek


Oh, and put more of that interesting history in the caption.
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Old 08-08-2011, 03:49 AM   #12
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Mitch, I'm thinking your taking away from the station with the train in there, (if you want to capture the historic aspect of the station) and both ends are missing, one end by the train the other by the crop. I think a night shot under the lights would be the way to go, like some of your other classics you have done. There's an old Depot (Old as in, Abraham Lincolns funeral train passed by it en rout to Springfield) I go by every day that is going to be tore down and I want to get some good shots of it, but like your station it has long roof lines creating a lot of shadows, the other problem is, it's abandoned and doesn't have any lights.

Bill
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Old 08-08-2011, 04:11 AM   #13
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No sweat, Ron.

I was just curious as to whether my appeal was without merit.


Janusz, the up angle (much more drastic prior to correction) is the result of my attempt to not unnaturally cut off the caternary poles. I actually have a step ladder most of the time but it would have had to be a few dozen feet taller for a work around. Perspective correction does wonders but you get to a point where only a panoramic crop works well - short of a blimp or airplane in the sky.


Bill - Ya gotta work with what you got. I think the most important part of the station was captured. One option is to shoot the station alone but then you do not have a time stamp. Shooting at night would not necessarily permit a better composition other then possibly omitting the need to capture the poles - assuming they were as dark as the night sky. I did shoot Amtrak on the inside track which gave me more of a 3/4 view but once I correct the perspective (flatten considerably), I have to be careful not to disturb the crop monster. The taller SEPTA train on the outside track made up for some of that space, I thought. Shooting more head on gave more detail of the facade. J - the frame earlier left a gap between the train and the station which was filled by a bunch of ugly cars.

Obviously, I concede that from a screener's point of view, all this info is not taken into account. My surprise was a failed appeal after such issues were documented.

/Mitch

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Old 08-08-2011, 03:06 PM   #14
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Hi Mitch,

I can sympathize. I've had a particular shot in the back of my mind for the better part of 3 years, and after numerous attempts, I'm convinced that the only angle that will give me the lighting and composition I need is one that requires some elevation. Unfortunately, it is more than a step ladder can provide and far less than I'd get with an airplane.

In the case of your image, you probably did do about as well as you could as a ground-pounder. I would agree with J that getting some elevation would allow you to show a more pleasing angle on the train and get over that blasted fence. His example is an excellent one. A tall step ladder may do the trick for you. I just worry that if the RR people or the local constabulary see you walking up with a big-ass ladder, they'll freak out, thinking you're about to get yourself electrocuted.

Is there a parking lot behind you where that ladder wouldn't be so obvious? Are there any multi-story buildings nearby where you could get permission to shoot through an open window? In the case of my shot, there is such a building. I just haven't figured out who I need to talk to about getting in there.

As a last resort, Bill's idea of a night shot isn't a bad thought. If the place is deserted, perhaps a ladder and a thermo-nuclear flash might do the job.
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