Old 03-19-2008, 01:14 AM   #1
MassArt Images
Senior Member
 
MassArt Images's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Pittsburgh, PA area
Posts: 718
Question Trying for a glint shot...suggestions?

Rejected for poor lighting(backlit). So how does one get a glint shot in? What would improve the "glint" attributes of this picture? Aren't glint shots by nature backlit?

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=691931684

Thanks for taking the time to share your advice/expertise
MassArt Images is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2008, 01:25 AM   #2
NSFan14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New Haven, KY
Posts: 723
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MassArt Images
Rejected for poor lighting(backlit). So how does one get a glint shot in? What would improve the "glint" attributes of this picture? Aren't glint shots by nature backlit?

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=691931684

Thanks for taking the time to share your advice/expertise
Well the nose isnt dark enough in my opinion. Also the picture looks very grainy!
__________________
-Alex Moss
NSFan14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2008, 04:27 AM   #3
a231pacific
Senior Member
 
a231pacific's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 822
Default

"Glint" shot are by definition back lit, but the key is to have the background dark, with the glint a rich gold. Your shot is exposed for the background, so it just looks back lit.

You can improve it in photo shop, by darkening the lower to mid tones, increasing the contrast and upping the saturation. You can achieve the same effect in camera by underexposing the shot by between 1/3 and 2/3 stops. Either set your exposure compensation for -1/3 or -2/3 or in manual meter off the sky. If it is a strong glint, use the sunny 16 rule and expose as though it were full sun.

Here's a slight rework of the shot. There is also some sun flare in your shot which you could clone out.

Michael Allen
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	NS_8376RP.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	211.3 KB
ID:	2640  
a231pacific is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2008, 04:32 AM   #4
cassfan3
Senior Member
 
cassfan3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 172
Default

I'm VERY far from a glint expert and really don't do all that much with the technique. However, it seems that there needs to be a lot more contrast between the nose and the loco side in your shot for it to be a candidate for RP. That is, the nose should be more blacked out with more or less just head lights showing, and the side should be a lot more "glinty" if you will. The sun really needs to be at the lowest angle possible, and this is often tough in the east with our shorter lines of sight (at least where I am). It seems that you predominantly see this type of shot with steam (which works well to illuminate the smoke plume) or out west.

Here is a typical glint that recently snagged a SC:

Image © Craig Williams
PhotoID: 217731
Photograph © Craig Williams


But this type of thing is totally possible in the east. One of my favorites:

Image © Ron Flanary
PhotoID: 202093
Photograph © Ron Flanary


My take on an "eastern" glint. Had to do something different since I figured that GEVO wasn't going to give me any plumage to make things interesting.

Image © Nick McLean
PhotoID: 218873
Photograph © Nick McLean


Hope this helped.
__________________
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=13200

-Nick McLean
Greenville, NC
cassfan3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2008, 06:28 PM   #5
ssw9662
Senior Member
 
ssw9662's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 839
Default

Pretty good attempt, however it isn't late enough in the day to make for a really dramatic glint shot. I've found that these photos look best in the last 15 minutes or so before sunset, that's the time of day that you get a nice golden tone throughout the photo.

I'll toss in my own attempt at a glint shot. It was taken at around 4:10PM (ignore the EXIF data - I forgot to bump the time back an hour for DST) which in early December is about 10 minutes before sunset.

Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©
__________________
Austin
Canon EOS 7D
Canon 70-200mm f/4 L
Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
Canon 50mm f/1.8
My Railpictures.net Photos
flickr
ssw9662 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2008, 11:13 PM   #6
a231pacific
Senior Member
 
a231pacific's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 822
Default

Of the three excellent shots that Nick referenced, only the first one is a true "glint" shot.

Ron's and Nick's are both excellent examples of effective back lighting. RP doesn't normally like back light, but those two examples show how you can make it work. For me, back lighting is dramatic lighting.

For "glint" the subject has to have an almost metallic glow, either gold or silver, depending on the sun angle. And as has been pointed out, good back lit and good glint shots generally have the nose of the train silhouetted against a lighter background or the sky.

Michael Allen
a231pacific is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.