Old 11-29-2007, 05:58 PM   #1
jdirelan87
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Default New Computer, Need Help Adjusting

Hi All,

I recently upgraded to a much faster and more powerful computer. While its made photo editing much easier and more effective, I'm having problems adjusting to my new monitor.

I've been getting alot of over sharpened rejects and from my end they look just fine. Here are a few that from my screen look smooth and fine. What do you guys think? If they are infact over sharpen, by how much?

Thanks
-John Ireland

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=962680553

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=451687&key=0

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http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=336083094
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Old 11-29-2007, 06:20 PM   #2
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NS curve, to my eye, too strong on the power, but I don't see it in the foliage, which is usually what one also sees

OC bridge, enough to introduce jaggies into the lines at the top, branches of trees lower look overdone also

IM train - just a bit much for my tastes

NS F's - not sure, would need to look at it on a better monitor at home
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Old 11-29-2007, 06:38 PM   #3
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In the first three I see some "zaggies" in wires and/or white handrails. But it's pretty marginal.

Over sharpening appears to be a real trap. I do it all the time, because it makes the overall picture really jump out (as yours do). But the cost is usually those zaggies in the details. My solution is to force myself to back off a bit at the end of sharpening process, and carefully examine any detail that is a thin line.

The "digital noise" comment on the last pictures is one of those great mysteries of life for me. I don't see it. But maybe that is because I've been shooting film for so long that a bit a grain is a natural part of any picture, especially under poor lighting conditions. Indeed grainy black and white used to be an accepted style to achieve gritty realism. But I have successfully used Noise Ninja and the PS noise reduction routines to remove it when others see it.
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Old 11-29-2007, 07:04 PM   #4
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I don't see these pictures as oversharpened either John, but in each picture there is an area that just doesn't look right, generally in a shaded area.

First shot has this slight gray haze that I commonly get when I lighten a dark photo. The image quality seems poor in the foliage to me, though you aren't going to get every leaf in detail. Did you lighten this photo at all? It may be that if the picture was underexposed that the detail wasn't recorded very well, and lightening the picture brought that out.

Second shot looks decent to me, but again, those trees in the lower left don't look like they were photographed with a DSLR. Once again, the buildings in the background are getting a haze over them, although that could just be air quality.

Third one looks fine to me.

Fourth, more haze and poor image quality, especially in the dimmer left portions of the photograph.

I'm guessing you lightened all of these photos, and that's where the problems are coming from. If you didn't, well, I have no idea.
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:30 PM   #5
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A quick question: how do you old photos look on the new monitor? I'm not sure why you would change your sharpening techniques just because you have a new monitor. If you had success in the past with your workflow, why the need to change?
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:55 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
A quick question: how do you old photos look on the new monitor? I'm not sure why you would change your sharpening techniques just because you have a new monitor. If you had success in the past with your workflow, why the need to change?

Good question. that was the first thing I did, old pictures look fine also. The problem is that I never really paid attention to the amount of sharpening I did on the old computer (as it would obviously vary from photo to photo).

On the new computer just like the old, I sharpen until it looks good to my eye, there lies the problem.
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:07 PM   #7
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Quote:
The problem is that I never really paid attention to the amount of sharpening I did on the old computer (as it would obviously vary from photo to photo).
Ah, I see. I pretty much use the same settings for all my photos (100%/0.5/0 full size shot and 50%/0.2-0.5/0 on the RP-sized image).
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:11 PM   #8
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On the OC shot I do see a few undesirables in the sky, some of them almost look like dust spots on the camera sensor. At any rate, retouching them should clean the image up nicely.

The 4270 has some blotchy noise, especially in the F's nose. Do you have any noise reduction software?

Good luck with the new computer!
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Old 11-29-2007, 11:20 PM   #9
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home computer:

NS curve: lots of jaggies on the rail closest to the train that the train is not on

OC bridge: definitely oversharpening halos around the lines

#3: looks OK to me

NS Fs: I presume the noise they are referring to is the graininess in the beams of sun coming down diagonally in the center of the image. The white areas of the nose of the F has some color noise.
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:00 AM   #10
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Default What camera settings

John,

Can you tell us a bit more about your camera settings for the first shot?

Thing like file format, image size

Jpg or RAW?


etc.

Alan
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