Old 07-21-2010, 10:26 PM   #1
jesse52
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Question Some advice for an "underexposed" night shot

Here's the photo in question:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=837172&key=0

My first attempt at a night shot. I think it went just fine, but obviously there's something that they don't like.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:41 PM   #2
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It is a good try for your first attempt. I don't know if this can't be exposed properly in post processing though without a ton of noise appearing.

Just curious, did you shoot through a window or something? Strange reflection-like green cast in the center-left. Might just be lens flare, but it looks odd to me.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:41 PM   #3
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It's underexposed meaning that there's nothing that's lit except the rails, and the huge streak. The huge green lens glare isn't appealing either. A streak shot has to have something to look at aside from the streak, and this shot just doesn't have it.

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Old 07-21-2010, 10:49 PM   #4
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The green lens glare is from a slightly dirty polarizer I forgot to take off. I'm going to try again tonight hopefully and try to get a better shot.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:09 PM   #5
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try a longer exposure (including more time before or after the train) with a smaller aperture, this will let the rest of the scene become lit and decrease the mega-streaks from the headlights
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:09 PM   #6
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I'd recommend trying to photograph a scene with something else involved. Signals are generally the easiest prop to incorporate. At the very least, allow the exposure long enough to bring out the landscape.

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Old 07-22-2010, 02:05 AM   #7
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Diamond D stole my words, you need less of a dynamic range.
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everytime i see non-train photos of yours i think, "so much talent. wasted on trains."
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Old 07-22-2010, 02:47 AM   #8
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Was that train coming at you? Those types of "streak" shots work best when the train is going away from you. Then you avoid that "blob" where the headlight is shining directly into your lens.

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Old 07-22-2010, 02:54 AM   #9
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Default Thanks for the help

Yes, the train was coming towards me. I couldn't incorporate a signal for a train coming this direction, but I could for the other direction. I will try to use all of your advice when I try to get another shot tonight.
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Old 07-22-2010, 03:24 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jesse52 View Post
Yes, the train was coming towards me. I couldn't incorporate a signal for a train coming this direction, but I could for the other direction. I will try to use all of your advice when I try to get another shot tonight.
Take some test shots to see what kind of settings are going to give you a better exposure on the surroundings. If you can get some of the landscape features to show up, that would be better.
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Old 07-22-2010, 03:59 AM   #11
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Would using a black card help to expose the landscape more?

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Old 07-22-2010, 04:41 AM   #12
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Now that your polarizer is off the camera, leave it off the camera. Filters are better for making coffee than digital photography.
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Old 07-22-2010, 08:33 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Would using a black card help to expose the landscape more?

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Well, that depends...is there a blinding headlight coming toward the camera?

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Now that your polarizer is off the camera, leave it off the camera. Filters are better for making coffee than digital photography.
Speak for yourself. 95% of the time I'm shooting with sunlight, I have a CP filter on my lens. Or, did you mean to say, "leave it off the camera at night"?
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Old 07-22-2010, 11:06 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias View Post
Speak for yourself. 95% of the time I'm shooting with sunlight, I have a CP filter on my lens. Or, did you mean to say, "leave it off the camera at night"?
I think he was meaning "at night".

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Old 07-22-2010, 11:29 PM   #15
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Those bright lights at the top are dominating the scene. What are they? If they are part of the landscape they are going to be difficult to deal with, unless you just exclude or crop them, which would allow more exposure to bring up the surroundings. And how many exposures did you take?
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