Old 12-26-2016, 05:55 PM   #1
Mberry
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I discovered recently that my Nikon D5100 (bought new in September 2012) has a shutter count of about 250,000. From what I've read online, the life cycle for this camera is 100,000. Any thoughts or expertise on whether I should just keep using it till it dies, or if I'm better served to get a new camera body in the near future?

On a related topic, I've been looking at both the Nikon D5500 and D7100 as replacements.... any feedback on those models?
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Old 12-27-2016, 01:48 AM   #2
Dennis A. Livesey
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A quick look says to me that the D5500 would be the way to go. It is newer, has a flip screen, a newer processor and much higher ISO.
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Old 12-27-2016, 03:34 AM   #3
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Duplicate post
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Old 12-27-2016, 04:05 AM   #4
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My Nikon D5000 did great service and I loved it (I still have it as a standby). It worked in all weather conditions (dusty, heavy rain and even a bit of snow) and had frequent outdoor lens changes - some of these lens changes were done in close proximity to a working steam locomotive....I abused it and never once have I visually picked up on any sensor spots / dirt. I then upgraded to a D7100 and have been plagued by sensor spots resulting in three or four sensor cleans being necessary since July 2013 (Nikon agent not happy), despite me being very careful and keeping outdoor lens changes to an absolute minimum. So although I love it, the constant sensor spot problems have been very irritating.
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Old 12-27-2016, 04:19 AM   #5
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Since I ride the backside of the wave of progress and am cheap, I purchased a Nikon refurbed D7100 to replace my battle worn D90. I have been a regular buyer of so-called refurbished equipment from Nikon and others, and frankly it looks like new stuff without the fancy packaging, and the savings is significant.

So far I am happy with the D7100.

On the other hand if you are getting good results with the D5100 why replace it? Personally I would wait until you sense there is something going wrong. I replaced the D90 (and the 18-200 lens on it) with a D7100 and an refurbed 18-140 lens only after I was starting to sense some sharpness issues. Still not certain whether it was a lens problem, camera problem, or operator error, but the cost of refurbed replacements was reasonable so why not. The combination of more pixels and an arguably better lens seems to produced better results but I have not used it enough to make any kind of definitive claim. Here is sample from my new camera and lens:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124319...posted-public/
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Old 12-27-2016, 11:36 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mberry View Post
I discovered recently that my Nikon D5100 (bought new in September 2012) has a shutter count of about 250,000. From what I've read online, the life cycle for this camera is 100,000. Any thoughts or expertise on whether I should just keep using it till it dies, or if I'm better served to get a new camera body in the near future?

On a related topic, I've been looking at both the Nikon D5500 and D7100 as replacements.... any feedback on those models?
If you're happy with the camera, send it in for shutter replacement. The shutters in both of my camera bodies have been replaced (one of them twice). If you like the body, spend a few dollars to get the shutter replaced and keep on shootin'!

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Old 12-27-2016, 07:27 PM   #7
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If you're happy with the camera, send it in for shutter replacement. The shutters in both of my camera bodies have been replaced (one of them twice). If you like the body, spend a few dollars to get the shutter replaced and keep on shootin'!

Hadn't thought of that really - was this through Nikon?
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Old 12-27-2016, 09:52 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by SAR Connecta View Post
My Nikon D5000 did great service and I loved it (I still have it as a standby). It worked in all weather conditions (dusty, heavy rain and even a bit of snow) and had frequent outdoor lens changes - some of these lens changes were done in close proximity to a working steam locomotive....I abused it and never once have I visually picked up on any sensor spots / dirt. I then upgraded to a D7100 and have been plagued by sensor spots resulting in three or four sensor cleans being necessary since July 2013 (Nikon agent not happy), despite me being very careful and keeping outdoor lens changes to an absolute minimum. So although I love it, the constant sensor spot problems have been very irritating.
I took my first digital camera home, took it out of the box, and I already had a spot on the sensor. So I took it back to the dealer and he wanted to charge me $50 to clean the sensor. He quickly saw the error of his ways and cleaned it for free, but needless to say I purchase elsewhere now. But more importantly I have learned to love the one lens does all zooms despite their limitations, and rarely change lenses anymore. Even that is not fool proof, but at least I have not (yet) had any more spots.
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Old 12-28-2016, 02:45 AM   #9
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Yes, you can get sensor spots under even the most benign set of operating conditions, but you are much more likely to have the problem if you change lenses outdoors, particularly in dusty environments, such as desert areas, or in the presence of steam locomotives. I typically operate with two cameras to avoid lens changes and the risk of lens drops and missed shots. I use one body with a normal zoom, and one with a 70-200 tele. I do change lenses, but I do so under controlled conditions, whenever possible, such as indoors, or in a car.

I don't have too many problems with sensor dust, but when I start getting stuff that is showing up in the photos, I fix the problem. My first course of action is to try the rocket blower. If that doesn't work, I get out the sensor swabs and wet-clean it. I don't like doing it, and I try to minimize the number of times that I do it, but I want a clean sensor and I don't want to constantly have to clean up my photos. It usually takes several swabs to get it looking OK. I use the Delkin Devices Digital Duster kit. Their swabs are less expensive than Photographic Solutions product and work just as well.

In my estimation, if you're seriously into digital photography, you need to get past all of the fear-mongering and learn to clean your own sensor. Pros do it all the time. Watch the videos, watch someone who knows what they are doing and just be careful. Basically, you're doing the same thing that Nikon or Canon would do if you sent your camera in to be cleaned. You're just not paying them $50-$75.
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Old 12-28-2016, 03:12 AM   #10
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...two cameras to avoid lens changes and the risk of lens drops...
Yes, two camera bodies definitely avoid a lot of problems.
There is a 28mm lens somewhere on the Shawangunk Ridge that rolled away during a lens change. Fortunately not too expensive.
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Old 12-28-2016, 11:32 AM   #11
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Speaking of sensor spots, I had a good chuckle a week or so ago when I decided to submit the bunch of shipping photos I have amassed (by chance) while waiting for new and old locomotives to either arrive or leave the port of Durban, South Africa, to the website MarineTraffic.com. Browsing through their database and some of the newer photos that had been added I noticed that one of their regular photographers has two very large brown spots in all his photos that date back over a lengthy period of time! I also had to smile at their very relaxed version of "photo screening" referred to as moderating and thought to myself that I'm really glad for and grateful to the screeners (and the wonderful photographers from around the world) here at RP for their tighter requirements, beautiful photos and for having had the opportunity to have gone through the RP process.
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Old 12-28-2016, 01:18 PM   #12
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Hadn't thought of that really - was this through Nikon?
Canon.
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Old 12-28-2016, 07:55 PM   #13
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250,000 clicks, that's a lot of photos. Maybe you need a new D5!
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