Old 09-21-2008, 06:11 PM   #1
Freericks
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Default Static Displays or Structures and Shadows

Just thought I'd start a general conversation on the topic of shadows on static displays and structures.

There are quite a number of preservered locomotives and railroad depots that I am aware of that are displayed in such a way that there is no way to get a full sun shot of them. Local communities have added trees and fences that cast shadows when the sun is perfect.

There are also famous structures, like Santa Fe's Garvanza Viaduct here in LA which are now treed in. While there is no more Santa Fe on the viaduct, it is still in use as a mass transit rail line.

I'm just curious, to what extent folks have gone to/are thinking of going to, to try and get shots of such shadow, fence, and foilage challenged subjects that would be nice to have represented in the data base?

It seems sad to me to say, Garvanza Viaduct can't be photographed anymore. Or that the Soldier's Home Depot (here in West LA) can't make the database as it has too many shadows around it, no matter what time of day. (I'm not arguing for allowing shadowy shots or shots with trees in the way into the data base... I'm presenting a problem that I haven't figured out a solution to, wondering if others have pondered same and found their own solutions.)

Last edited by Freericks; 09-21-2008 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 09-21-2008, 06:26 PM   #2
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I would suggest - of course without having tried it myself! - shooting on an overcast day that is as bright as possible without leaving shadows, and then looking for ways to avoid including the sky.

Bright overcast is said to be (hint - haven't done this either!) excellent for outdoor portraiture because the light isn't harsh. So that's where I am coming from - get strong light without shadows, and focus on compositional excellence to enliven the shot in the absence of interesting light.
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Old 09-21-2008, 06:40 PM   #3
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Shoot at night or bring the equipment you need to open up the shot up a bit.
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Old 09-21-2008, 09:02 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freericks
1. There are quite a number of preservered locomotives and railroad depots that I am aware of that are displayed in such a way that there is no way to get a full sun shot of them. Local communities have added trees and fences that cast shadows when the sun is perfect.

2. I'm just curious, to what extent folks have gone to/are thinking of going to, to try and get shots of such shadow, fence, and foilage challenged subjects that would be nice to have represented in the data base?

1. I prefer to shoot this stuff at night. It's cooler, too. I also make use of a foggy low light day when there are no shadows.


2. What extent? I have thirteen lights I can fire by radio triggers to make my own "night display" shots when I want. As for foilage, best I can do is shoot in winter. If the shot ain't there, it ain't there.


Kent in SD

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Old 09-21-2008, 09:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
I would suggest - of course without having tried it myself! - shooting on an overcast day that is as bright as possible without leaving shadows, and then looking for ways to avoid including the sky.

Bright overcast is said to be (hint - haven't done this either!) excellent for outdoor portraiture because the light isn't harsh. So that's where I am coming from - get strong light without shadows, and focus on compositional excellence to enliven the shot in the absence of interesting light.
I photograph houses in "bright overcast" all the time and it's AWFUL lighting. I'd take dark overcast ANY day.
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