Old 02-04-2011, 03:37 AM   #1
CSXRailfanNS
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Default Nikon Wireless Shutter Remote Question

Hey folks. I have just a quick question for anyone who has one of these:

http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Produc...Infrared).html

I'm looking to purchase one for a few reasons: railroad photography, landscape photography(taking a class on it), and for night photography. I've seen that people have taken one picture over like a duration of say eight minutes or something like that, and I've come to learn, correct me if I'm wrong, that you can accomplish that long of a time using the Bulb feature. Bulb being when you press and hold the shutter button, it takes a picture for however long you hold it, which would be nice given that my Nikon D5000 has only up to thirty seconds for the longest exposure. I obviously don't want the camera shake that would come from pressing the shutter button down and then releasing it, and also standing there for that long.

Sorry this was drawn out, I just wanted to make sure I explained myself clear and that you know what I'm asking.

I want to know, with this remote and using the Bulb feature, can you press the button on the remote once to open the shutter, then come back say five minutes later and press it again to close the shutter?
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Old 02-04-2011, 05:54 AM   #2
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Does no one have one of these?
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Old 02-04-2011, 06:47 AM   #3
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Yes, that's the whole purpose of a shutter release. It enables you to take exposures for as long as you desire. I recommend a wired one personally, as a wireless one is something else to worry about having a backup battery for. I've posted some examples of my work below..

14 minute exposure:

Image © Chase55671
PhotoID: 311237
Photograph © Chase55671


16 minute exposure:

Image © Chase Gunnoe
PhotoID: 329447
Photograph © Chase Gunnoe


10+ minute exposure:

Image © Chase55671
PhotoID: 294151
Photograph © Chase55671


Chase
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Old 02-04-2011, 12:30 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSXRailfanNS View Post
Does no one have one of these?
Hi CSX,

I have both the corded and IR remote shutter releases. My D90 can use either. Having used both extensively, I tend to prefer the IR remote. It has the disadvantage of having to be pointed at a sensor on camera, and yes, if you're not careful and timing is critical, you could miss a shot with it. You also have to push some buttons on the camera to set it up to use the IR remote. With the corded release, you just plug in and go. On the other hand, the IR is tiny and extremely portable. I can hold it in my teeth if my hands are full with something. The darn corded release needs to be wound around something when carrying the camera/tripod combination, to prevent it from banging against the tripod legs. As long as I am standing somewhat in front of the camera, I can also trigger a shot from some distance away....with the corded release, the cord is the limiting distance. IMHO, there is a place for both, so I have a place for both in my bag.

WRT your question about using bulb with the IR release, the answer is YES. I use it that way all the time. The only thing you will have to do is ensure that you have set your camera up so that the IR remote shooting mode stays active long enough for you to complete your shot(s). Most Nikon Cameras automatically turn the feature off after some period of time, but you can select the time limit.

Good idea to read the camera manual thoroughly on the topic before you decide.

Hope that helps...
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Last edited by KevinM; 02-04-2011 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 02-04-2011, 01:22 PM   #5
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My D40X doesnt have a spot for a cable shutter release, so I had no choice but to go with the wireless remote.

It works pretty good. Sometimes the camera doesnt want to recognize when im hitting the button, and most times I have to hold it in front of the camera for it to trigger. Also learned this past summer, that if you are doing night shots at a railfest, make sure no one in your immediate vicinity has the same wireless remote. You will end up setting off each others shutters without realizing it.
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Old 02-04-2011, 04:45 PM   #6
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Yeah, you can. But, you do have to realize the range is only about 25-30 feet.
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Old 02-04-2011, 04:51 PM   #7
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Thank you guys for the responses. I posted my last message before I went to bed and forgot to check it again lol.

Chase, I think I do understand the purpose of a shutter release. The first picture was one that I was kinda referencing to in my first post.

Kevin, thank you for your "review" so to speak lol of them. I did actually read the manual on setting them up. And even though I don't plan on going that far away from the camera, I think I might go with the IR remote.

Granville, I do know about the multiple remotes/cameras because my landscape photography teacher told us about that issue.

I just wanted to make sure I didn't have to sit there holding the button on the remote for 15 minutes while the camera is taking the picture.

So what I've learned, correct me if I'm wrong. The wireless remote needs to be pointed at a sensor on the front of the camera (which I did know already), the remote also can trigger other cameras or other remotes can trigger mine (already knew). And with the wireless remote you press the button once, but not holding it down, to open the shutter to start taking the picture in bulb mode, and then you press the button again to close the shutter, enabling you to take exposures such as 15 minute ones.

Thank you guys again!
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Old 02-04-2011, 04:56 PM   #8
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If you are doing a 10-20 minute exposure, at what minute should the train ideally come through? Does it matter?
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Old 02-04-2011, 06:33 PM   #9
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If you are doing a 10-20 minute exposure, at what minute should the train ideally come through? Does it matter?
That's a good question. It varies. It takes some familiarization over time that helps you get an idea on long the shutter should be open prior to the trains arrival. For that Hawks Nest photo using my 10mm lens, I guessed. I opened my shutter as soon as I saw the headlights a couple miles away and kept it open until the headlights were no longer in sight. That was right at 14 minutes. I was real concerned I was going to be underexposed, as the trains headlight was my primary source of light, however I was pleasantly surprised to see I had some detail in the sky.

Honestly, depending on how much light you have nearby (just the littlest amount of light plays a major role in lengthy timed exposures), is what I base my exposures off of. If my only source of light is the trains headlight and the rest of the scene is pitch black, I'll open the shutter as soon as he comes into view, then will leave it open a few minutes after he has passed.

Most of the time, I'll open the shutter as soon as the train is visible, and let him paint the scene for me.

Hope this helps,
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Old 02-04-2011, 06:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSXRailfanNS View Post
And with the wireless remote you press the button once, but not holding it down, to open the shutter to start taking the picture in bulb mode, and then you press the button again to close the shutter, enabling you to take exposures such as 15 minute ones.

Yes, that is correct. One click to open. Another click to close. It really helps to be near the camera, so you can verify that it received the transmission from the remote. As noted previously, if you don't point it just right and it misses, it could screw up your picture....IF the timing is really critical. If not, just click again to close. Usually, if I'm at one of those organized night shoots where Lumidynes or powerful flashes are used, I'll go with the corded release, because I can be more sure that things will happen when I push the button. With the IR, if I miss on the open, I could miss the first flash and blow the shot.

Also, again, make sure your camera is set up to keep the IR remote mode active for at least as long as your exposure is going to last, or it could close the shutter on you prematurely. If I were a Nikon Designer, I would change the feature to make it stay active until the camera is purposely switched to some other mode, or until it is turned off.
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Old 02-04-2011, 07:12 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chase55671 View Post
Most of the time, I'll open the shutter as soon as the train is visible, and let him paint the scene for me.

Hope this helps,
Chase
Thanks. I will give it a try as soon as I get a tripod.

I prefer to look at female trains myself.
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Old 02-04-2011, 10:31 PM   #12
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Yes, that is correct. One click to open. Another click to close.

This is actually the answer I was looking for lol. That's all I needed. But I have issues explaining things in simple terms.
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Old 02-04-2011, 10:45 PM   #13
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Yes, that is correct. One click to open. Another click to close.

This is actually the answer I was looking for lol. That's all I needed. But I have issues explaining things in simple terms.
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Old 02-04-2011, 11:59 PM   #14
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I prefer to look at female trains myself.
Seems most people I hear refer to trains in the masculine for some reason, I don't have any idea why. Ships are referred to in the feminine (long stories on that one too) which makes me wonder why trains are different.
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Old 02-05-2011, 03:55 AM   #15
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Seems most people I hear refer to trains in the masculine for some reason, I don't have any idea why. Ships are referred to in the feminine (long stories on that one too) which makes me wonder why trains are different.
I don't know that most people refer to trains in the masculine, although maybe things have changed in more recent years. If you listen to old railroad songs, like "The Wreck of Old 97", trains are usually referred to in the feminine. "This is not 38, but old 97. Put her into Danville (or Spencer, depending on the version) on time."

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Old 02-05-2011, 08:58 PM   #16
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Now while we are on discussion of this, are there any specific model or brands that one should get for the camera? I was looking at a Canon Remote Switch RS60 E3 for the T2i Rebel (550D). It has a 2 foot cable, etc.. Opinions?
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:47 PM   #17
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Ian, that's the one I use. Many thousands of uses later, it's still doing exactly what it's supposed to be doing. I've never missed a shot because it didn't click the shutter, and the lock hasn't ever slipped.

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Old 02-06-2011, 12:48 AM   #18
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Ian, that's the one I use. Many thousands of uses later, it's still doing exactly what it's supposed to be doing. I've never missed a shot because it didn't click the shutter, and the lock hasn't ever slipped.

Loyd L.
Glad to know that its a good piece of equipment, appreciate the help Loyd!
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