Old 01-11-2011, 05:14 AM   #1
norfolksouthern
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Default Poor Image Quality? Be impossible...

Daylight photography is passed. Now, the next I do with night photography but it still unsuccessful as keep struggle with my night photography.

Anyway so here my picture had kind of poor image quality.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=893311&key=0

Strange...probably I think it angle not great... :/

(Warning about my grammar)


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Old 01-11-2011, 05:34 AM   #2
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Needs a CCW rotation. Why did you leave so much dead space around the unit? You need to crop a lot closer so that the unit fills up most of the frame.
It will never get accepted because of that pole in the way. Sorry but try again.
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Old 01-11-2011, 11:57 AM   #3
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It looks like the loco is about to tip over and the shot is badly composed. The pole is a shot kiler. You probably could have shot more head on the nose and got the shot on. When you shoot night time images of sitting trains, there's no reason not to shoot multiple shots at multiple angles and multiple settings.
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Old 01-11-2011, 03:33 PM   #4
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I'm not seeing "PIQ", but I do agree with everyone else's observations.
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:04 PM   #5
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glare spots all over the sky could be teh PIQ issue

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Old 01-11-2011, 09:27 PM   #6
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You're on you way to some good night shots as you have figured out essentially how to capture a subject at night... now, you need to move forward and apply what you've learned shooting your daytime images to your night time images.

I think you are thinking - "wow, I did it" rather then "wow, this is a great shot". I agree too with what the others have said regarding the image as is. Good luck on a Nutter attempt!

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Old 01-11-2011, 10:10 PM   #7
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Hi David,

I don't have Photoshop on the computer I'm on at the moment, but here are my observations....many of which are the same as the other folks:
  • Shot needs to be cropped a lot closer. There is a lot of space around and above the subject that doesn't contain anything of interest.
  • Shot is unlevel. Use the grid feature in your photo editing software to get the vertical surfaces (locomotive verticals, building verticals, etc) as straight up and down as possible. Fortunately, by shooting wide, you've left yourself a lot of room to rotate the photo and still be able to crop it nicely.
  • The post in front of the locomotive will probably be considered a foreground obstruction by the RP Screeners and probably eliminates this particular shot from consideration. If you could find another angle to shoot that doesn't place that post in front of the locomotive, that would definitely improve things. In this case however, that might mean shooting from a side that is not as well lit.
  • The shot looks a tad overexposed (too bright) to me. If there are lens flares in the shot as Lloyd pointed out, the problem will be made worse if the shot is too bright. Reducing exposure a tad in Photoshop will probably make the subtle ones invisible. For the brighter ones, such as the one above and to the left of the engine, you may need to use the cloning or healing tools (carefully) to remove them. Lens flares can be a royal pain.
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Old 01-11-2011, 11:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbassloyd View Post
glare spots all over the sky could be teh PIQ issue

Loyd L.
Oops. Didn't see them til you pointed them out.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mgoldman
Good luck on a Nutter attempt!
Dangit Mitch!!! I just spit my Pepsi out all over my monitor. So much for editing photos tonight. They all have dust spots now.
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Old 01-12-2011, 12:36 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EMTRailfan View Post
Dangit Mitch!!! I just spit my Pepsi out all over my monitor. So much for editing photos tonight. They all have dust spots now.
That's what you get for drinking Pepsi. You should only drink The Real Thing.
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Old 01-13-2011, 09:44 AM   #10
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Obviously so everyone is correct about few light flares on my picture. Because I don't have any kinds of lens hood or fliter with us yet..

Thank you Kevin for definitely


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Old 01-13-2011, 02:52 PM   #11
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Hi David,

Regarding the lens flares....

I would definitely AVOID putting any filters on your lens when you shoot at night. If anything, filters tend to make that problem worse. I recently had a situation in which I had to shoot indoors with a lot of overhead lights. I had a filter on the lens and no case or anything protective handy in which to put the thing. Not wanting to mess up a relatively expensive filter, I left it on the lens. What a disaster. I would have been better off putting it in my pocket with my car keys!

A lens hood can help in some situations, depending on where the light sources are around you. I am surprised that you did not get one of those with your camera. Nearly all lenses come with them these days.

If you can avoid shooting with bright light sources in your frame, you won't get lens flares at all. If you can't avoid it, then the key to managing lens flares is looking carefully for them in your viewfinder before making the exposure. USUALLY, they are visible, although sometimes they are subtle. If you see any, try moving the camera around a few feet left or right. Sometimes, this will make them go away....or it may at least move them to places in the frame where they are easier to remove with Photoshop.

Generally speaking, the longer the exposure, or the smaller the aperture, the more likely lens flares are to be visible in your shot.
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Old 01-13-2011, 03:12 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM View Post
A lens hood can help in some situations, depending on where the light sources are around you. I am surprised that you did not get one of those with your camera. Nearly all lenses come with them these days.
Actually, the wonderful folk at Canon do not include lens hoods with lots of their lenses. I believe only their L lenses are sold with hoods. Not absolutely certain (I buy used) but I believe that is how it works.
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Old 01-13-2011, 04:37 PM   #13
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Wow. Not being a Canon-shooter, I had no idea. I guess that explains why David doesn't have a lens hood. He has a very nice camera...a 50D with the 28-135 mm lens...I think.

My experience with Nikon is different. Four out of the 5 lenses I have ordered came with lens hoods. The exception was the kit lens that I bought with the D40X a few years back. I later learned that the hood for it had been discontinued during that time period and has since been replaced with a different unit.....which I purchased. Except when using a polarizer or some other rotating filter that I need to get my mitts on, I nearly always shoot with a lens hood.
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