Old 03-04-2008, 04:52 AM   #26
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You should limit changing lenses trackside, Oscar. In Australia, as you well know, the conditions are quite dry and minute particles of dirt are always on the move.

It is better to change a lens in the car with the windows wound up, as someone said before.
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Old 03-04-2008, 11:49 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJ
You should limit changing lenses trackside, Oscar. In Australia, as you well know, the conditions are quite dry and minute particles of dirt are always on the move.
Michael, as I said before, I didn't actually change lenses.
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Old 03-04-2008, 04:50 PM   #28
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Be very careful about using blower bulbs, and if you do change them every 3 or 4 months.

I use a blower bulb and one day discovered a whole of specs. A blow only made it worse. Dry cleaning by my friendly camera did not get them off either. Eventually it took major wet cleaning.

The issue we discovered, was that the bub had perished slightly inside (and this was a high quality bulb as well) and was spraying minute perished rubber particles onto the sensor. The camera expert noted this had happened before.

I now used a bulb made out of a kind of "shiny" rubber (quite hard) which works well.

A tip - always keep the bulb in a zip-loc bag.
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Old 03-04-2008, 11:23 PM   #29
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I remember I was trying to get a shot of a dust devil and I had to quickly change my zoom for a wide angle it came at me so fast. Before I knew it I was reaching for my macro lens. ; ) I do turn off the camera (wise procedure) as well as swapping out lenses with the lens facing the ground.

I'm a bit paranoid but it hasn't stopped me from changing lenses. I have had a few sticky dust particals require coercing however.

I was at a hockey game and saw the press photographers constantly swapping lens - on and off and on again, and between swaps the lenses were set on the ground w/out a cover on either side - I was shocked.

/Mitch
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Old 03-05-2008, 03:49 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mgoldman
I remember I was trying to get a shot of a dust devil and I had to quickly change my zoom for a wide angle it came at me so fast. Before I knew it I was reaching for my macro lens. ; ) I do turn off the camera (wise procedure) as well as swapping out lenses with the lens facing the ground.

I'm a bit paranoid but it hasn't stopped me from changing lenses. I have had a few sticky dust particals require coercing however.

I was at a hockey game and saw the press photographers constantly swapping lens - on and off and on again, and between swaps the lenses were set on the ground w/out a cover on either side - I was shocked.

/Mitch
Mitch most newspapers have "pool" lenses such as a 300mm f/2.8 of 400mm f/2.8 that one would take to sporting events. When I was still a working news photog, we had several Nikkor 300 f/2.8s, a 200f/2.0 and the really big gun... a Nikkor 300 f/2.0. I was always careful with those lenses, and treated them like they were mine, but I had some co-workers who would do the same thing as you saw. They figured, "they belong to the paper, so who cares". Not exactly the best attitude, but what does one expect.
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Old 03-05-2008, 05:17 AM   #31
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The press photogs are always wanting to get that game winning moment or some sort of dramatic picture to summarize all the words in an article about the game. If they took time to cap and store the lenses every time they would end up missing half the game. Plus, you also have to think that they just get in a level of comfort with what they are doing and let some things slip.
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Old 03-05-2008, 05:55 AM   #32
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Sat next to some the one day, who was taking photos and kept taking off the 500mm and adding an extender. id this every 5 minutes - literally. I asked him about dust etc. and he said yes - a problem. Cleaned his sensors once or twice a day!

Me, I keep my old cameras so I have spares and do not have to change lenses so often. I have a 300d that is as good virtually in terms of quality as my 30d. Consider maybe buying an old second hand body if you swop lenses a lot!
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Old 03-05-2008, 07:29 AM   #33
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My Canon EF 28/105 USM suits my photography habits perfectly; I rarely take it off the camera. Dust and dirt really isn't a problem for me.
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Old 03-06-2008, 02:09 PM   #34
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Default Vacuum your sensor

I have a 5 year old battered Nikon D100 with a lot of dirty miles on it. Nikon's service rep told me years ago to never use a bulb because you can drive particles further into the camera. Set your camera to hold the mirror up and hold it upside down over your vacuum hose with your hand keeping the two from getting too close. Just a light seal and let gravity and the vacuum do the work. It will get nearly everything off. You can also get a really good artists brush(they sell them down to nearly single strand) and pick off stuborn particles. Works for me! BFN, Kathryn
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Old 03-06-2008, 02:36 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathryn
Set your camera to hold the mirror up and hold it upside down over your vacuum hose with your hand keeping the two from getting too close. Just a light seal and let gravity and the vacuum do the work. It will get nearly everything off.
A vacuum!!!

This post reminded me of
http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/methods.html
where I see that vacuum is in fact a considered alternative. Learn something new every day!

But see #16 on the list!
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Old 03-06-2008, 03:42 PM   #36
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Lightbulb

The vacuum is a very interesting idea.

I actually considered doing this even before I started this thread, but I wondered whether it would make the problem better or worse. On the one hand, it would tend to pull the dust/dirt away from the sensor/filter instead of just massaging it around as some types of cleaning techniques might do. On the other hand, there would be a massive amount of air drawn out of the sensor cavity that has to be replaced with equally massive amount of air coming from somewhere......= new dust brought in????

Perhaps the home vacuum might be too powerful for this task? They do make tiny little vacuums for use with instrumentation that might be be very appropriate for this application.

I like the vacuum idea a lot better than putting solution on a swab and touching the filter. Even if I get the dirt off, I can picture that leaving it streaky, dooming my chances of getting any more shots into RP
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Old 03-06-2008, 10:16 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM

I like the vacuum idea a lot better than putting solution on a swab and touching the filter. Even if I get the dirt off, I can picture that leaving it streaky, dooming my chances of getting any more shots into RP

Id rather to that than use a vacuum.

The makers of the photography solution's sensor swabs guarentee their product and if it EVER harms your sensor they will fix your camera. I was reading an interview with one of the "head honchos" for the company, I think he said theyve only had to replace 3 cameras ever. The solution that you put on the swabs dry quickly and have never left a streak on my sensor.
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Old 03-06-2008, 11:01 PM   #38
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In my pre-digital days, I had two Canon Rebels, which minimized lens changing to a degree. I'd consider that now if I trusted my 300D. But it makes no sense to me not to change lens liberally on a (D)SLR. Why have one if you're not going to do it? I'll take care not to get dust in there, but sometimes your car is a mile away when you need to change lens and nt changing it is dumber than possibly getting the sensor dirty.


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Old 03-07-2008, 12:20 AM   #39
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I agree that there is no sense in buying lenses with different capabilities and not changing them. Cleaning the body and sensor is something that I do on a frequent basis anyway. A lot of people are afraid to do it until they see how easy it is.

As for the vacuum method possibly introducing more dust the chances are that there will not be as much dust coming in because of the idea of negative pressure. Because more air is being pulled out of the cavity that can make it back into the cavity due to the seal of the body of the camera there is little chance that much dust will make it to the sensor. I wouldn't do it in a dusty environment and I would go as far away from the vacuum body as the hose would allow to prevent being near dust from the exhaust.
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Old 03-07-2008, 01:07 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBCagle7073
As for the vacuum method possibly introducing more dust the chances are that there will not be as much dust coming in because of the idea of negative pressure. Because more air is being pulled out of the cavity that can make it back into the cavity due to the seal of the body of the camera there is little chance that much dust will make it to the sensor.
Sorry, but this particular set of statements makes no sense. Unless you have a seal around the camera body and the vacuum opening, and unless you permanently leave the vacuum attached (but then what about the lens? ) you will certainly have the same volume of air returning into the sensor cavity, sooner or later, that the vacuum pulled out.

Now, the air coming in may very well have less dust in it than the air coming out.

My worry would be to make sure the vacuum is gentle enough not to damage fragile internal parts such as the shutter or mirror assembly.
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Old 03-07-2008, 01:35 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
Sorry, but this particular set of statements makes no sense. Unless you have a seal around the camera body and the vacuum opening, and unless you permanently leave the vacuum attached (but then what about the lens? ) you will certainly have the same volume of air returning into the sensor cavity, sooner or later, that the vacuum pulled out.

Now, the air coming in may very well have less dust in it than the air coming out.

My worry would be to make sure the vacuum is gentle enough not to damage fragile internal parts such as the shutter or mirror assembly.
My response was in response to the statement made by Kevin which said

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM
The vacuum is a very interesting idea.

I actually considered doing this even before I started this thread, but I wondered whether it would make the problem better or worse. On the one hand, it would tend to pull the dust/dirt away from the sensor/filter instead of just massaging it around as some types of cleaning techniques might do. On the other hand, there would be a massive amount of air drawn out of the sensor cavity that has to be replaced with equally massive amount of air coming from somewhere......= new dust brought in????

Perhaps the home vacuum might be too powerful for this task? They do make tiny little vacuums for use with instrumentation that might be be very appropriate for this application.

I like the vacuum idea a lot better than putting solution on a swab and touching the filter. Even if I get the dirt off, I can picture that leaving it streaky, dooming my chances of getting any more shots into RP
I took this to mean that he was worried about air coming in while the vacuum was hooked up and sucking. Of course air is going to reoccupy the void after the vacuum is removed. I don't see how that would allow in any more dust than any other time the lens is changed unless you are cleaning your sensor in the middle of a tractor pull or other dusty environment.

It's going to be impossible to remove every single speck of dust that could ever land on your sensor filter. What is better cleaning it and having a a very small amount of dust on the sensor following the cleaning or leaving enough dust on the sensor that you see it when you look at a photo?

If you have ever watched dust in the sunlight through a window or other bright light it tends to glide along and fall simultaneously. If you wave your hand up in front of it most of it will bob a little bit but continue gliding/ falling. The dust wants to fall down and the camera opening is pointed down. I would say the amount of dust making it to the sensor filter is minimal.

Just using the camera will allow some dust in as previously mentioned. It will never be 100% clean. Hope that clears up what I was saying for you a little bit and makes it make some sense.

As to the pull of a vacuum being too strong the cupping of your hands around the opening would allow you to start off with a low level of pull and tighten the seal with your hands if needed.

There used to be a microvac that was advertised on TV for cleaning computer keyboards and things. If those are still available they would make a viable alternative for those that are afraid to use a full size vacuum.
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:56 AM   #42
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Do not use a domestic vacuum cleaner. While it sucks up the large particles of dirt, it returns plenty fine ones to the air (even the water filter ones). Test this by putting the vacum in a "sun beam" one day and starting it.

The vacum option to us is the one mentioned in JRMDC's thread - see Item 12, http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/methods.html

This site is actually good - read it and I would suggest use whatever of the methods you are comfortable with - there are supporters for every method, and as I said what you use is related to what you prefer, and what type of dirt issue you have (loose, sticky, fine, large, smears etc).
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Old 03-07-2008, 11:49 PM   #43
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The best and only sensor cleaner I've ever used:
http://www.giottos.com/Products/CL/Rocket-air_l.jpg

This product does a wonderful job and gets all but the most stubborn crud off your sensor.
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Old 03-09-2008, 01:37 PM   #44
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ok read this http://www.luminous-landscape.com/es...cleaning.shtml
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:42 PM   #45
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Default Make that 2 that use the vacuum idea

So far, some really good ideas. I too have used that vacuum in an effort to suck the particles of dust out of my camera body. Just because you blow them off your sensor with the blower bulb, the particles still are inside the camera and settle back eventually.

I too keep the vacuum hose a few inches away (say 6"), and in conjunction with the bulb blow air over the sensor and hope that whatever gets the crud out. And the actual vacuum as far away as possible and it is a HEPA vacuum too.

Yes, dust bunnies..the bane of digital photography!

If money wasn't an issue, I would simply buy another body to attach my other lens to and stop changing lenes. I already limit changing lenses.

I have had my sensor professionally cleaned too, I suggest everyone do it on a routine basis, say every year or two depending on how much you are in the field, and the conditions.

For example, if you are riding an excursion train, in the vestibule for a couple hundred miles or so, and shooting/changing lenses, you are likely to get brakeshoe dust or cinder residue if the power is steam...
If you fan a lot of dirt roads, you are going to get dust even with the windows up! So on certain outings you may expose your gear to more dust, meaning when you get back a professional cleaning is in order.

I haven't tried the other methods that involve wiping or directly cleaning the sensor, but I think I may try.

The easiest background to see the dust bunnies are of course, the sky, and snowy scenes. The clone stamp works but sometimes the dust bunny is over a wire or something that makes removal in P/S difficult (or at least more work).

I had one pesky bunny tht looked like something on a slide under a microscope ..yuk!

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Old 03-13-2008, 09:08 PM   #46
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Hey Chico,

Where did you go to get your sensor cleaned and roughly how much did they charge you? I've heard stories of $50-75.

Thx,

Kevin
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Old 03-13-2008, 10:36 PM   #47
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Default Professionally cleaning sensor

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM
Hey Chico,

Where did you go to get your sensor cleaned and roughly how much did they charge you? I've heard stories of $50-75.

Thx,

Kevin
Think I paid in the 75 dollar range.

I go to the local camera repair shop, the one left over from the film camera days. It seems like every fair sized city has one, just look under 'camera repair' in the yellow pages. Back when I shot film I'd have to go and get my body cleaned/shutter time check every couple years, so look for that kind of 'mom and pop' camera repair store. The one I go to in Madison will tell you if the repair (say, a lens) is beyond their scope and will send it to the Mfr. (nikon/Canon etc) for further review. In the digital era, these camera repair stores are finding new lines of duties i.e. cleaning sensors/camera bodies. Camera body comes back like new. definately worth it if you shoot a lot. Cleaning lenes professionally is good idea too, if you are taking one in you might as well get em all cleaned...

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