Old 05-08-2011, 03:42 AM   #1
AKeth
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
Default How to Fix Image Quality?

Hello Everybody.

I'm new to the whole forum thing, so please bear with me.
I have a quick question on image quality. I have a DSLR (Nikon), and have gotten photos on Railpictures, but how would I be able to fix the overall image quality if needed?

Here is a link to an example:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=926802&key=0

Let me know if you can't view the photo.

Thank you!
-Alex
AKeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 03:48 AM   #2
NorfolkSouthernC40-8
Member
 
NorfolkSouthernC40-8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Maynard, MA
Posts: 54
Send a message via AIM to NorfolkSouthernC40-8
Default

Hey Alex, welcome to the forums.

I do not really see a significant problem with image quality so I can not really provide any input there. However, that tank car seems to be taking a lot away from the lead locomotives. If you were to resubmit the screeners would more than likely ding you with obstructing objects.
__________________
MY RAILPICTURES.NET PHOTOS
YOUTUBE ACCOUNT

"Well wake her ass up, we gotta' win tomorrow!"
NorfolkSouthernC40-8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 04:01 AM   #3
troy12n
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,333
Default

Dont shoot at F4.5 for a scene like that would be my first suggestion.

According to your exif, you are shooting 1/1000 at f4.5 ISO100.

Shoot at f8 or f7.1, 1/640 at ISO400 or something thereabouts. Shooting at f4.5 you can see out of focus foreground (not really OOF, but ugly bokeh) which is not desirable in this instance.

I dont know why they called this PIQ, I would have thrown a different rejection like cropping, composition, soft or some other of the many rejections they could have other than PIQ.

I have no idea about the technical capabilities of your camera, as I dont shoot Nikon, but I assume you can get a decent shot at ISO400.
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 04:03 AM   #4
AKeth
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
Dont shoot at F4.5 for a scene like that would be my first suggestion.

According to your exif, you are shooting 1/1000 at f4.5 ISO100.

Shoot at f8 or f7.1, 1/640 at ISO400 or something thereabouts. Shooting at f4.5 you can see out of focus foreground (not really OOF, but ugly bokeh) which is not desirable in this instance.

I dont know why they called this PIQ, I would have thrown a different rejection like cropping, composition, soft or some other of the many rejections they could have other than PIQ.

I have no idea about the technical capabilities of your camera, as I dont shoot Nikon, but I assume you can get a decent shot at ISO400.

Would you recommend shooting at this setting most of the time?

Last edited by AKeth; 05-08-2011 at 04:06 AM.
AKeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 04:07 AM   #5
troy12n
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,333
Default

Are you shooting manual or one of the automatic settings?

I shoot manual 100% of the time, and if it's a sunny day I am shooting F8 and attempting to keep a shutter speed of at LEAST 1/500 if it's a moving target. If it's not, shutter speed means a LOT less. To properly stop motion, you need to strive for at least 1/500.

In a perfect world, I would strive for 1/640, ISO100, F8, but that's not always possible so you have to compromise. Since you can only lower shutter speed so low and get acceptable results for moving objects, you have to sacrifice aperture (less depth of field) or image quality (ISO). I try to not go above ISO400 on my camera because it tends to introduce noise. Again, I have no idea about the technical merits of your camera. I may adjust aperture to F7.1 or even F6.3, but rarely go "wider" than that.

Also, that specific shot would lend itself to a vertical crop as-shot. You have a lot of useless pine trees on either side which lend nothing to the scene. I have to ask also do you have another frame where the locomotive is a little closer to you, that would help.
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 04:10 AM   #6
AKeth
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
Are you shooting manual or one of the automatic settings?

I shoot manual 100% of the time, and if it's a sunny day I am shooting F8 and attempting to keep a shutter speed of at LEAST 1/500 if it's a moving target. If it's not, shutter speed means a LOT less. To properly stop motion, you need to strive for at least 1/500.

In a perfect world, I would strive for 1/640, ISO100, F8, but that's not always possible so you have to compromise. Since you can only lower shutter speed so low and get acceptable results for moving objects, you have to sacrifice aperture (less depth of field) or image quality (ISO). I try to not go above ISO400 on my camera because it tends to introduce noise. Again, I have no idea about the technical merits of your camera. I may adjust aperture to F7.1 or even F6.3, but rarely go "wider" than that.

Also, that specific shot would lend itself to a vertical crop as-shot. You have a lot of useless pine trees on either side which lend nothing to the scene. I have to ask also do you have another frame where the locomotive is a little closer to you, that would help.
Thank you!
AKeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 06:30 AM   #7
Holloran Grade
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: In the California Republic
Posts: 2,774
Lightbulb

It would be better if the oncoming train where on the track nearest you and if it were sticking out further than the tank.

The FRED on the tank is blurry also.
Holloran Grade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2011, 01:38 PM   #8
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,010
Default

I would also advise not shooting apertures wider than f5.6 unless you absolutely have to. I stay with f8 most of the time. The easy way to stay at f8 and still have some shutter speed is to shoot ISO 200 vs. 100. On the Nikons, there is virtually no difference in image quality, but the extra ISO will give you more options for camera settings. On a sunny day, anything from 1/640th to 1/1000th at ISO 200 f8 will usually work.

As Troy noted, stay away from automatic shooting modes, particularly "P", where the camera basically makes ALL of the decisions. I only use automatic modes when I'm hunting grab-shots of people, and even then, I stay with "S" or "A", depending on the situation. Since I shoot raw, I can usually do something with the image even if the camera is a bit off in its selection of settings.
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Lots of Steam Railroad stuff there from all over the US.
KevinM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 02:12 AM   #9
AKeth
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
Default

Thank you everybody for your help!

-Alex
AKeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.