Old 06-17-2010, 08:56 AM   #1
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Talking I Got This Rejection - For "High Sun."

I got this rejection for high sun on this shot.

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So now I want to know how I can get rid of the "high sun" in my picture.

That way I can have it on this Web Site in addition to my RR Pictures Archives account.

Is high sun something that I can filter out?

Can I do that in Photo Shop, or is that some type of adjustment that I need to do on my camera?

Also, I think we, out here in "sunny" California should get some type of variance on this one, since we have so much sun and it comes out each and every day.

Really, during the Summer there is seldom a day that we don't get some sun and it is always way up in the sky, so how are we supposed to take pictures of the choo choos without "high sun?"

Further, I don't think I can go back to that spot at night because there are no streetlights, and that train won't be there anymore.

Oh dear, what shall I do?

Last edited by Holloran Grade; 06-17-2010 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 06-17-2010, 02:11 PM   #2
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Unfortunately, there's no way to remove high sun during post-processing.

I live in Queensland, Australia and like you, we get sunshine nearly every day of the year. During the Summer months (well, September to April, in reality) there is high sun. In the height of summer (December to February) it is almost impossible to avoid between the hours of 09:00 and 15:00 so you just have to avoid taking photos during this period. Often you will get hit by the infamous Queensland afternoon thunderstorm and that will just ruin your day!
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Old 06-17-2010, 06:04 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holloran Grade View Post
I got this rejection for high sun on this shot.

Attachment 5544

So now I want to know how I can get rid of the "high sun" in my picture.

That way I can have it on this Web Site in addition to my RR Pictures Archives account.

Is high sun something that I can filter out?

Can I do that in Photo Shop, or is that some type of adjustment that I need to do on my camera?

Also, I think we, out here in "sunny" California should get some type of variance on this one, since we have so much sun and it comes out each and every day.

Really, during the Summer there is seldom a day that we don't get some sun and it is always way up in the sky, so how are we supposed to take pictures of the choo choos without "high sun?"

Further, I don't think I can go back to that spot at night because there are no streetlights, and that train won't be there anymore.

Oh dear, what shall I do?
[slow clap] Well done.

But, yeah, there are two filters you can use to get rid of high sun. The first is the "rise & shine" filter. To use this filter, you need to get out of bed when it is still dark. Next, make sure you are trackside from just after sunrise to about 9-10 in the morning, and hope a train goes by.

The other filter is the "afternoon sweet light" filter. This filter only works from about 4-5 p.m. to sunset, with the same trackside requirements as the "rise & shine" filter.

You should be able to order these filters from B&H or pick them up at any decent-sized camera store. Hope this helps.

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Old 06-17-2010, 06:14 PM   #4
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You need to form a facebook group called "RP.net rejections ruined my life".

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Old 06-17-2010, 08:07 PM   #5
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They may sell the filter that gets rid of high sun at the same store where they sell the California blur filter. Located somewhere around Sacramento, I believe.
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holloran Grade View Post
Also, I think we, out here in "sunny" California should get some type of variance on this one, since we have so much sun and it comes out each and every day.
Get used to it. You're lucky that you're in California and have a good set of scenery to shoot. Up here in ND, I don't even have near that. And it isn't sunny every day. But it's still something to simply work around.

Quote:
Oh dear, what shall I do?
As previously stated, get up early and stay out late. [Getting up at sunrise yesterday morning netted me five shots for here.] Or, if you can't resist staying out in the middle of the day, break out the video camera and submit to the sister site.

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Old 06-17-2010, 09:09 PM   #7
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Hi,
Shouldn't the "High Sun" rejection only be used if the "High Sun" in question is in some way detrimental to the image though? Looking at the shot shooting later in the day would add shadows that from the angle this photo is shot from, wouldn't be visible anyway. In the current shot the odd shadow down the body doesn't detract from the shot in any way. The landscape looks pretty dry and desert like so in my opinion the high sun suits that landscape.
Personally I'd crop a lot off the sky as it's just bland without any clouds or exhaust filling it but rp.net also don't like crops that stray too long, which I do think is pretty daft, but hey ho that's my opinion and it's their site.
Just my thoughts on the matter,
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Old 06-17-2010, 09:24 PM   #8
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Bob, Bob, Bob...

I'm guessing from this post that you have reached that wonderful moment in all railfan's lives when they have finished editing all of the digital images in their folders, and you were bored, looking for something to do?

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Old 06-17-2010, 10:36 PM   #9
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Lightbulb Well here is the deal.

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Originally Posted by Freericks View Post
Bob, Bob, Bob...

I'm guessing from this post that you have reached that wonderful moment in all railfan's lives when they have finished editing all of the digital images in their folders, and you were bored, looking for something to do?


Yes Charles, since I don't work in "Cubie Land" this is my only forum and opportunity for interaction with my fellow human beings, and "I" am so in need of some type of interaction.

Actually, what really happened was I had some time during the day yesterday to make a run up the hill and I did.

In March (when I was there last) I had found this spot near 582 and wanted to shoot it, but I had found it too late in the day (sun would back light the train) and I had boot failure (the sole on my boot peeled off).

Fast forward to yesterday, I got up there about 9:30 a.m. and immediately went over to my new found honey hole to squeeze off some frames.

At the time all seemed good, until I got home and looked at the images on the monitor and was struck by a feeling of dread.

If you look at the image, there are shadows on the front blade next to the coupler, below the rear view mirrors and on the sides of the car body below the capacitor cooling vents.

See below:
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ID:	5545

This was not all that obvious on my little 3" display on the back of the camera, but it is very clear on the image.

I selected the best from the bunch to see if it would pass muster, but I was busted.

At least I see what the problem is now and I started this post to sort of show what the mysterious high sun rejection is all about.

I need to go re-shoot this place earlier in the morning.

Chris, I really enjoyed the filter suggestion, however I must now submit the following excuses and baseless explanations for why I can't follow your simple advice which would arguably solve my "high sun" problem.

Unfortunately it is hard for me to use the "rise and shine" filter since I have a school age child and I must either take him with me, or drop him off before I go choo choo watching.

Moreover, it is hard for me to get up at any point in the day, since I am extraordinarily lazy.

Nowadays, skiing in the Winter (cause the days are shorter) and the occasional trips to the emergency room are about all that is going to get me up at the crack of dawn anymore.

Also, I don't do dawn patrol at the beach anymore either, cause now homey surfs in the p.m.

My other problem with the "sweet light filter" is that there just isn't anytime to use it, since there is homework, and after school sports to deal with.

The occasional trip to the local train station is hard enough to fit in, but a haul to Cajon is a 5 hour commitment at a minimum.

And my weekends are all taken up with picking up trash on the sides of the freeway (just kidding).

Ergo, I reluctantly admit that I have become a "Soccer Mom" with a camera and 4x4 and I don't know how it happened.

That is why I am waiting on the edge of my seat to see how reproduction affects Mr. Benson's rail photoging activities.

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Old 06-17-2010, 10:41 PM   #10
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Having children cuts the free time down significantly, and it's worth every second lost.

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Old 06-19-2010, 06:16 AM   #11
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Looks like your out in the Mojave. When I go to CA, I do this:

6:00am-Wake up, shower, eat and then photograph trains

9:30-10:00am-Head back to the hotel

10:00-3:30-Nap, Eat, Watch TV, Hydrate, Rest

3:30-Sunset: Photograph trains

It's fun to enjoy the wind right after the sun goes below the horizon.

The split day can be rough, but I find that the high desert heat is to much in the middle of the day for me.
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Old 06-19-2010, 08:03 AM   #12
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Talking Yes, that would be the way to do it.

That way the use of those special filters would be unnecessary.

I was not in Mojave, rather I was in the Cajon Pass.

Also, I have this unique aversion to Mojave, because I had to drive round trip from Montclair (about 40 miles East of L.A.) to Tehachapi State Prison on a number of occasions over the period of a year, and I had to be at the front gate with my crew by 9:00 a.m.

We ate many a meal in Mojave going to, and coming back from Tehachapi.

The days were long and I just don't want to go up that way anymore.
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Old 06-19-2010, 05:10 PM   #13
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Here in Florida it is a trade winter to summer

Summer you get good light from 6:30 AM to about 10 AM or so.

Then you are out of business till 4 PM to sunset

In the winter light is good tho sunrise is not till almost 730 and sunset is near 5. So either way you get about 8 hours give or take.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:53 AM   #14
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I consider Cajon to be part of the Mojave; since by about Rim of the World Scenic Byway (and the awesome Del Taco there) the Floria and geography is Mojave in nature.

Also like telling people I've been to Siberia and Baghdad (California of course)

My time schedule I posted is actually for the Cajon Pass. I hotel up in Victorville.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:30 AM   #15
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I consider Cajon to be part of the Mojave; since by about Rim of the World Scenic Byway (and the awesome Del Taco there) the Floria and geography is Mojave in nature.

Also like telling people I've been to Siberia and Baghdad (California of course)

My time schedule I posted is actually for the Cajon Pass. I hotel up in Victorville.
Been to Kelso?

That is worth the trip.

Well "I" think Mojave was more interesting when the SP was there.

"I" don't think of the Pass as part of the Mojave desert so much because it is the border between said desert and the coastal plain.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Califor..._and_woodlands

Photography wise, the part of the Pass where the image was captured is subtly different from the rest of the high desert where the City of Mojave, Victorville and Barstow are located because it is lower in elevation, and there are virtually no Joshua trees.

Course if you go up the the hill about 3-5 miles as the crow flies, you will be above 4000 feet and that will put you in the Mojave biome.

http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/mojave_desert.htm

In my opinion, Joshua trees are what make the Mojave unique from a photographic point of view.

Just like the Saguaro makes the Sonoran desert unique.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonoran_Desert

On the ground the lower pass near Devore and the area at the top where Hesperia is located look quite different, but it takes a long time to see it.

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