Old 12-21-2016, 04:17 PM   #1
spacetrain1983
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Default Is this really underexposed?

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...39&key=4006187
A few days ago I submitted this shot of a UP manifest next to some local power, and it was rejected for being underexposed. However, after using "Auto Brightness" in the editor, the newly edited photo was rejected for poor hue:
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...47&key=2350983
So I'm not sure where to go with this. These were taken back in January so I had nowhere near as much experience in photography as I do now.
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Old 12-21-2016, 05:18 PM   #2
John West
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I think that image is a good candidate for your personal collection. In my mind there is little or nothing very interesting about the picture, regardless of the exposure or hue. Perhaps one way of looking at it is when you evaluate a picture ask yourself what is interesting about the scene (to somebody else). Lots of possible answers: unusual equipment, scenic view, dramatic composition, great lighting, perhaps some kind of graphic pattern, interesting people, and so on. Lots of possibilities, but that particular image seems to lack any of them.

With regard to the particular rejection reasons, my theory is when a screener runs across a image that just isn't "interesting", he hits whatever reject button is most convenient. Some times there is no single reason that stands out. Maybe poor composition, or PAQ would have been more appropriate. But for some reason there seems to be some reluctance to use those rejection reasons, and they would rather nit pick more technical stuff.
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Old 12-21-2016, 05:39 PM   #3
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Taking the photo at face value, I would suggest a more interesting composition. As it stands, the 1889 is cut off abruptly behind the cab. Unless obstructions or trespassing prevented doing so, I would suggest a "side by side" portrait of both locomotives would have generated more interest, and needed to be photographed from more of a 30-45 degree angle. Yes, at the end of the day, you still have a 45 degree wedge shot, but try to make it as interesting as possible.
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Old 12-21-2016, 06:18 PM   #4
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I agree with what John & Mike said. Even if you resolve the hue/exposure issues, they'll give you a bad cropping rejection next I would think.
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Old 12-21-2016, 07:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShortlinesUSA View Post
Taking the photo at face value, I would suggest a more interesting composition. As it stands, the 1889 is cut off abruptly behind the cab. Unless obstructions or trespassing prevented doing so, I would suggest a "side by side" portrait of both locomotives would have generated more interest, and needed to be photographed from more of a 30-45 degree angle. Yes, at the end of the day, you still have a 45 degree wedge shot, but try to make it as interesting as possible.
While I agree with everyone else. I do think that had you followed Mike's advice, in this case, you would have received a backlit rejection. It appears that you are learning to make the best of the available light, despite the photo's other flaws.

While everyone has been stressing that a new camera is in order, it appears that you are still using MS Office to process your photos. If your Christmas list still isn't full, maybe you can get your parents to spring for a subscription to Adobe CC, which includes Lightroom and Photoshop CC.

Doug Lilly

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Old 12-21-2016, 08:47 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Decapod401 View Post
While everyone has been stressing that a new camera is in order, it appears that you are still using MS Office to process your photos. If your Christmas list still isn't full, maybe you can get your parents to spring for a subscription to Adobe CC, which includes Lightroom and Photoshop CC.

Doug Lilly
Agreed. $10 a month for one year is a great deal for Photoshop and Lightroom.
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Old 12-22-2016, 05:19 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John West View Post
Perhaps one way of looking at it is when you evaluate a picture ask yourself what is interesting about the scene (to somebody else). Lots of possible answers: unusual equipment, scenic view, dramatic composition, great lighting, perhaps some kind of graphic pattern, interesting people, and so on. Lots of possibilities, but that particular image seems to lack any of them.
I disagree with this. I don't think that every picture needs to be something new/unique/different/interesting. The interesting thing here is TRAINS. That's the whole underlying reason any of us are here isn't it? That we like trains. Some of us like steam, some like modern class 1s, some like short lines, etc etc. I don't think that just because an image is "common power" makes it any less of a good image, as the entire point (IMO) is to capture what is happening at a given moment in the world of railroading.

Now how that applies to RP is certainly a different can of worms, but I disagree with the dismissal of images by Mr. West just because of the "interest level" of the train. We all like trains and that's what I think matters.
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Old 12-22-2016, 03:10 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Decapod401 View Post
While I agree with everyone else. I do think that had you followed Mike's advice, in this case, you would have received a backlit rejection. It appears that you are learning to make the best of the available light, despite the photo's other flaws.

Doug Lilly

Good eye, Doug. I missed that, and you are right.
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Old 12-22-2016, 03:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph Cermak View Post
I disagree with this. I don't think that every picture needs to be something new/unique/different/interesting. The interesting thing here is TRAINS. That's the whole underlying reason any of us are here isn't it? That we like trains. Some of us like steam, some like modern class 1s, some like short lines, etc etc. I don't think that just because an image is "common power" makes it any less of a good image, as the entire point (IMO) is to capture what is happening at a given moment in the world of railroading.

Now how that applies to RP is certainly a different can of worms, but I disagree with the dismissal of images by Mr. West just because of the "interest level" of the train. We all like trains and that's what I think matters.

Some advice a very good photographer gave me early in my serious shooting years was "Show your best, keep the rest" and "Keep them wanting more, not the door." This is how I see Mr. West's advice-- not dismissing the other good advice I have heeded and espouse to a younger generation-- "Shoot it all." You SHOULD be doing that; but among the "all" find the very best to present. With time, more and more of your collection will become "interesting" (for lack of a better term) as mergers occur, paint schemes change, and locomotives are retired.
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Old 12-22-2016, 03:51 PM   #10
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Hi Spacetrain,

I would agree with the advice you are getting about finding better editing software. Something like Photoshop/Photoshop Elements or Lightroom will serve you much better, not only because they have more capabilities, but because they are the industry standards. Most folks here use one of those programs, meaning that people will have an easier time helping you than they do now. As others have said, you can purchase the gift that keeps on giving....meaning the $10/month subscription, or you can just buy one of the programs outright. I think that Walmart sells Photoshop Elements (PSE) for like $79. PSE will do everything you could need to do. You can also buy Lightroom outright, which is what I do.

I also advise being careful with the "Auto this or that" features in any software package, including the Adobe products. Photoshop Elements has all manner of them....Auto Contrast, Auto Color, Auto Levels....even something called "Auto Smart Fix." Sometimes, those features are magic....and sometimes they introduce hues and color casts that are undesirable. I have noted that Auto Levels, in particular, seems to like to add green to an image. If your eye is not finely tuned, you could miss that and end up with a bad color/hue rejection. The screeners ARE tuned in to it. After all, they have collectively looked at well over a million and a half photos.

As others have said, the image you posted to start this thread isn't the most interesting, but the original version does show a fair amount of processing improvement over ones you have posted in the past. If I were trying to make the best of this image, I might use a more panoramic crop such as 3:5 (and yes, they do take that here). That would eliminate a lot of the uninteresting foreground and sky. Also, if you have more frame on the right, I might crop a tad tighter on the left to get rid of the ass-end of that red car, and open up a bit more on the right, to at least include all of the lead truck on that SD. Again, that wouldn't make it a killer shot or an RP candidate, but it would put your best foot forward with an image you have.
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Old 12-22-2016, 10:45 PM   #11
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Here is an image that relates to a couple of points above. I happened to run across this while looking through recent posts, and I said, "that looks a bit familiar". Belmont is one of my favorite photogs.

Image © James Belmont
PhotoID: 600095
Photograph © James Belmont


It is rather similar Spacetrain's photo that was the original subject of this thread, and I think illustrates somewhat points by both Kevin and Shortlines: a tighter, perhaps wider crop to eliminate some of the less interesting stuff, and the fact images get more interesting as they age. I certainly have been a benefactor of pix improving with age, wish I still had a bunch of the stuff I threw out. Don't throw stuff out!
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