Old 04-04-2008, 12:40 AM   #1
RicHamilton
Senior Member
 
RicHamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 171
Default Where to go from here?

I'm not entirely sure this one will make it but I am open for suggestions on what to do. Is it salvagable?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF3465edit2.jpg
Views:	126
Size:	109.4 KB
ID:	2692  
__________________
Ric Hamilton
Berwick, NS
http://home.xcountry.tv/~r.hamilton
RicHamilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 10:03 AM   #2
alan-crotty
Senior Member
 
alan-crotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ashford Kent England
Posts: 349
Default Too Much Saturation

Hi Ric,

Too much saturation

Copy background layer , set blend mode to SCREEN, opacity 30%.

New adjustment layer HUE & SATURATION, Saturation slider, Master -20, Yellow -20.

Flatten

Sharpen USM 20% @ 0.8 threshold 2

See attached thumbnail

This look 'fair' on my calibrated monitor.

Alan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Doctored DSCF3465edit2.jpg
Views:	139
Size:	303.9 KB
ID:	2696  
alan-crotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 01:26 PM   #3
RicHamilton
Senior Member
 
RicHamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 171
Default

It started out over exposed (waaay over). Train went past me at track speed further down the line and I was lucky enough to get that shot as they were pulling into the yard. I had grabbed the camera and fired off a few before I realized it was set for the previous time I had used it.

I'll try your steps at home later tonight.
__________________
Ric Hamilton
Berwick, NS
http://home.xcountry.tv/~r.hamilton
RicHamilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 03:03 PM   #4
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alan-crotty
This look 'fair' on my calibrated monitor.
Well, I'm not on a great monitor, but I've seen enough shots on it that I can make a general comment. If this is the best that can be done, and Alan is good at this!, then forget about it.
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 05:18 PM   #5
RicHamilton
Senior Member
 
RicHamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
Well, I'm not on a great monitor, but I've seen enough shots on it that I can make a general comment. If this is the best that can be done, and Alan is good at this!,

He is.


Quote:
then forget about it.
By now I pretty much had anyway but I am trying to learn the PS methods. Up till now I had been a brightness, crop, contrast type of guy and it doesn't seem to work for me here. With all the recent talk of layers, dodging and burning and nothing good in stock to fool with I thought I might try fixing up one to see what PS can do and how much it could be rescued. I've seen some phenomenal transformations here lately.
__________________
Ric Hamilton
Berwick, NS
http://home.xcountry.tv/~r.hamilton
RicHamilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 05:32 PM   #6
alan-crotty
Senior Member
 
alan-crotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ashford Kent England
Posts: 349
Default Fair?

Janusz and Ric,

'Fair' is Brit English for not very good


Ric, I make a point of setting my camera to a usable setting before I put it away after use. That way I'm like a boy scout, always prepared

Alan
alan-crotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 05:53 PM   #7
RicHamilton
Senior Member
 
RicHamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alan-crotty
Janusz and Ric,

'Fair' is Brit English for not very good
I know. You were being kind.

Quote:
Ric, I make a point of setting my camera to a usable setting before I put it away after use. That way I'm like a boy scout, always prepared
It is funny that after you go through an experience like that you realize that you need to do stuff like that. I think it was AB2 that mentioned a similar experience in another thread. Now before I head out with it for railfanning I always check the ISO and set it to Auto just in case another case like that happens
__________________
Ric Hamilton
Berwick, NS
http://home.xcountry.tv/~r.hamilton
RicHamilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 07:18 PM   #8
alan-crotty
Senior Member
 
alan-crotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ashford Kent England
Posts: 349
Default And Cards

Ric,

Iwent out with no card in the camera last year

Since then I've always checked the camera out.

Alan
alan-crotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 09:56 PM   #9
Joe the Photog
Senior Member
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,898
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RicHamilton
Now before I head out with it for railfanning I always check the ISO and set it to Auto just in case another case like that happens
Setting it to auto is as bad as setting it for another type of shot. The camera is just guessing what it should be on. One shot might be at 200; another might be at 800 as it chnges settings. Keep it on manual at all times, just the right setting.

I love shooting at night. But the last thing I do before I put the camersa away is to put it to what I call my home base position. Roughly 1/400, f8 and always 100 ISO. That way when I shoot the next day, I'm at lesat close to what I should be.

Leaving the timer on is still my biggest issue. But it's been a while since I had to grab my camera, run for a shot, release the shutter just in time for the ONE shot and..... have it start the count down.


Joe
__________________
Joe the Photog Dot Com
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 10:15 PM   #10
Freericks
Met Fan
 
Freericks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 4,040
Default

I'm going to disagree with Joe on this one (which it is a rarity - I'm usually on the same page as him on most issues).

I also will always put the camera back in full automatic or automatic action mode when putting it away. I don't shoot in these modes that often, but I use them as a safety.

Should I ever grab the camera and just shoot, I'm more likely to get an image I can use than if I have the camera in manual and the settings are way off. It's a sort of a fail-safe system for me.

I have way too often in the past shot something fast only to disocver my settings were way, way off. Much as I don't like automotic, it's better than completely wrong.

As to the timer issue, it's a pet peeve of mine on the Rebel XT. I can't tell you how many times I discover it's set just as I go to take a shot. It's position on the back of the camera makes it way too easy to engage without knowing that I engaged it.
Freericks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 11:14 PM   #11
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,800
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe the Photog
Leaving the timer on is still my biggest issue. But it's been a while since I had to grab my camera, run for a shot, release the shutter just in time for the ONE shot and..... have it start the count down.


I do that once in a while. As the train is approaching, I look through the viewfinder, focus and push the shutter button....then nothing. I'm like "WTF?" A quick glance and I see the counter 7...6...5...

It's not that I use the timer very often, it's just that I'll end up bumping the button at some point and unknowingly set it in the timer mode. I can be rather clumsy with my equipment at times. I've also done that with the mode select dial and accidentally bumped it into A-Dep mode. This one time I beat the hell out of my car getting to a crossing just before the train came, only to miss the shot because it wasn't in manual.
JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2008, 01:12 PM   #12
RicHamilton
Senior Member
 
RicHamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe the Photog
Setting it to auto is as bad as setting it for another type of shot. The camera is just guessing what it should be on. One shot might be at 200; another might be at 800 as it chnges settings. Keep it on manual at all times, just the right setting.
Actually, my ISO setting is not affected by the AUTO. Once it is set on 100, it stays there until I change it. Something I am happy about.
__________________
Ric Hamilton
Berwick, NS
http://home.xcountry.tv/~r.hamilton
RicHamilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.