Old 09-24-2007, 05:38 PM   #1
WetRailsWA
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Default Tacoma Rail GP20

Red/White train against dull grey railcars. Two strikes, ejected from the game...

First submission got nabbed for too much contrast, so I resubmitted it with less and it became "bad composition" and "too much grain."

Yep I said grain, not noise.

That's because it was shot with my trusty 1970s era Vivitar 220SL through a 175mm lens. Yeah baby...The camera kit includes elements of my late grandfather's photo kit; his camera body wore out about 8 years ago - my Dad said he took thousands of photos with it - so I replaced body with an identical one off eBay for a whopping $45. It even has an internal light meter. I have lenses ranging from 28mm to the 175, plus some kind of "doubler" that apparantly turns my 175 into a 350. Haven't tried that one yet.



While it turns out this photo is not "RP Good" - as I've seen it described in another posting - by taking this and some other "practice photos" with the 35mm I've rediscovered the interactive nature of photography in this old school kit that I don't feel with my digital. Granted, it's pricey getting the photos developed, plus you have to wait a whole hour before they're done! As it is with my Olympus C4040, my big enemy is poor lighting. Finding any sort of situation with the right amount of light around here is mostly difficult. I'll probably try slide film, tripod, and remote shutter release the next time I head out with this kit; this would allow me to try even slower shutter speeds, at least on static subjects.

If anything RP and this forum have both nurtured my desire to experiment with the equipment I have, since I really don't have the budget to replace any of it.

Have a great week!
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Old 09-24-2007, 06:00 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WetRailsWA
some kind of "doubler" that apparantly turns my 175 into a 350. Haven't tried that one yet.
This sounds like a 2X converter lens, which doubles the focal length of the lens to which it is attached. Two negatives go along with that benefit: first, its use can lead to a noticeable reduction of image quality, and second, it also doubles the maximum aperture (it turn an f/4 lens into an f/8 lens) which makes the viewfinder less bright and also limits its usefulness for marginal light conditions. Either or both of these may be completely acceptable tradeoffs for any particular application.

Quote:
with the 35mm I've rediscovered the interactive nature of photography in this old school kit that I don't feel with my digital.
This question I open up to the peanut gallery; it's not directed at Kurt. I've seen mention of such feelings before. My question is - WHY? Is this just some sort of emotional connection to one's equipment from an earlier time in one's life, or do people actually feel a difference in handling or something? I must say I just don't get it. To me, the only difference is that the film must be wound after each shot. (Well, and the choice of film to use.)

I do not pine for my Pentax MX (or Canon Elan IIe), though I certainly recognize the roles they played in my development as a photog. But I would have developed in about the same way had it been digital all along, I think.
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Last edited by JRMDC; 09-24-2007 at 06:02 PM.
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Old 09-24-2007, 06:23 PM   #3
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This sounds like a 2X converter lens, which doubles the focal length of the lens to which it is attached. Two negatives go along with that benefit: first, its use can lead to a noticeable reduction of image quality, and second, it also doubles the maximum aperture (it turn an f/4 lens into an f/8 lens) which makes the viewfinder less bright and also limits its usefulness for marginal light conditions. Either or both of these may be completely acceptable tradeoffs for any particular application.
Okay, so that's good to know. Thanks for that!
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