Old 08-03-2012, 06:11 PM   #1
Kyle Korienek
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Default 1st Glint Attempt - Should I Continue To Pursue?

I was afforded my first attempt at a glint shot earlier this week. Any possible ways to improve this? It was first rejected for being backlit (duh...) but now its bad contrast. Any thoughts?

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...09&key=4559288

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Old 08-03-2012, 07:00 PM   #2
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That's not a glint shot. This is a glint shot --

Image © Bryant Kaden
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Your shot is a typical backlit shot of a train in a yard. The color looks off a little and it needs a little CW rotation as well as some sharpening.
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:21 PM   #3
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this is a glint shot:

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Old 08-03-2012, 07:30 PM   #4
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As I said, first try at it. Any personal techniques (aside from photoshop editing) to help achieve the desired results above? Faster shutter? Closer to the tracks in this instance?
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Korienek View Post
As I said, first try at it. Any personal techniques (aside from photoshop editing) to help achieve the desired results above? Faster shutter? Closer to the tracks in this instance?
Technically your photo is not bad. For a good glint shot, you need to wait until the sun is closer to the horizon. The timeframe for a true glint shot is, what, maybe 20 minutes?
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
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That's not a glint shot. This is a glint shot --
glint does not = silhouette

senior moment, Joe?
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:20 PM   #7
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They are tough. I think you kind of luck into them. Gotta be right time, right place. Sun has to be just right and at the correct angle to the train. Very low on the horizon.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:42 PM   #8
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What you want for a good glint shot is a nice late afternoon sun just before sunset or just right after sunrise. Now of course the sun angle has to be right for it to work. I was able to pull this off, but this shot here on this line is not really easy to pull off because this train usually runs during the late morning/afternoon hours. I just happen to be at the right place at the right time.

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Old 08-04-2012, 01:59 AM   #9
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Expose for the highlights. Let the shadows go dark, if not black.
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:08 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Korienek View Post
As I said, first try at it. Any personal techniques (aside from photoshop editing) to help achieve the desired results above? Faster shutter?
Shutter speed is somewhat irrelevant as the determining factor for achieving a successful glint shot. First you must understand basic exposure settings of the camera to decide what works best for the scene and lighting. If speeding or slowing the shutter speed will help you achieve a better exposure, then yes, that can make a difference. However, so can adjusting the aperture or ISO. Once you learn how all three relate to each other, then you'll better understand what it takes to get the proper exposure for a glint scene (or any other lighting for that matter).
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:11 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradorailfan View Post
What you want for a good glint shot is a nice late afternoon sun just before sunset or just right after sunrise. Now of course the sun angle has to be right for it to work.
Agreed.

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Old 08-04-2012, 04:42 AM   #12
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Thanks everyone! The sun for this photo was a little high at the time, it needed about another half hour to be at that nice low angle that I have gathered to be necessary for the proper style.

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Old 08-04-2012, 04:46 AM   #13
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Quote:
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Expose for the highlights. Let the shadows go dark, if not black.
Even though this is a somewhat simple explanation, this makes probably the most sense. Let the limited sunlight do all the work and don't overexpose. Many thanks!
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Old 08-04-2012, 05:37 PM   #14
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Kyle,

In addition to the sun being low in the sky, you need to look at the sun's angle relative to the train and then stand at roughly the opposite angle relative to the train so the light reflects off the side of the train and into your camera. Think of it like a bank shot in pool. Also, the shallower the angle of the sun is relative to the train, the better.



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Old 08-04-2012, 06:38 PM   #15
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Kyle,

In addition to the sun being low in the sky, you need to look at the sun's angle relative to the train and then stand at roughly the opposite angle relative to the train so the light reflects off the side of the train and into your camera. Think of it like a bank shot in pool. Also, the shallower the angle of the sun is relative to the train, the better.



That is very helpful! Based on the sun when I took my 1st attempt, I was too close and it was too high. Thanks Michael, also, killer job on those attached photos...
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