Old 07-26-2013, 05:31 AM   #26
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What your camera or lenses cost mean absolutely nothing. Forget that. Knowing how to use what you have is far more important. I shoot an with 8 MP 5 year old Olympus E500 with kit glass and have no issue shooting consistently good stuff, just realize what your limitations are and work around them. I have a wife with a disability and doctor's bills, a mortgage, gas, and any other number of bills to pay, I can't afford to spend thousands of bucks every year on new gear.
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Old 07-26-2013, 05:38 AM   #27
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What your camera or lenses cost mean absolutely nothing. Forget that. Knowing how to use what you have is far more important. I shoot an with 8 MP 5 year old Olympus E500 with kit glass and have no issue shooting consistently good stuff, just realize what your limitations are and work around them. I have a wife with a disability and doctor's bills, a mortgage, gas, and any other number of bills to pay, I can't afford to spend thousands of bucks every year on new gear.
Thanks for the support. I used what I had with the best of my abilities to get this photo on RailPictures. I guess that's enough to say what I have works.
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Old 07-26-2013, 05:53 AM   #28
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Why spend all that money on a lens like that and not get IS. Waste of money to NOT get that.
IS is nice to have, but the non-IS does just fine, even handheld:

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Old 07-26-2013, 05:57 AM   #29
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IS is nice to have, but the non-IS does just fine, even handheld
Yes, A friend of mine was able to grab this with his Non-IS 70-200mm F4.0L, which led me to the decision to get it over the IS Version.

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Nice photos by the way!
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Old 07-26-2013, 12:55 PM   #30
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Since you are saying my lens is garbage, would you mind telling me why instead of bashing me for not having expensive glass?
I was not bashing you for not having expensive glass, I was bashing your decision to upgrade body before glass. Also, I think you should take it as constructive criticism, even though I know myself I was truly bashing your decision, you should take it as constructive criticism. Furthermore, my main point about your 28-135 which seemed to go way over your head was the fact that you were using it wide open (I think f5.6 is wide open at that focal length since it's variable aperture) was an extremely poor choice. Like I said, F8 and ISO200 would have been a better choice. THAT part truly was constructive criticism by me, not bashing.

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I was never told entering the photography hobby that I need to sell everything I own to buy the most expensive glass or my photos would turn out awful.
Well, now you know... readjust your priorities accordingly.

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To be honest, and this is just me looking back at archived photos I have, I'd say my photos are getting better each time, and every time I get a new lens.
Thats good.

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I'm not exactly rich either, I only upgraded to the 60D for the FPS it gives out, and the swivel screen for composing tricky shots in the future.
I guess the "Do with what you can afford" phrase doesn't work anymore.
What is done is done, you will have your new body too, you can save your pennies for the 70-200 you want.


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What your camera or lenses cost mean absolutely nothing. Forget that. Knowing how to use what you have is far more important.
We have a winner!!!

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I shoot an with 8 MP 5 year old Olympus E500 with kit glass and have no issue shooting consistently good stuff, just realize what your limitations are and work around them. I have a wife with a disability and doctor's bills, a mortgage, gas, and any other number of bills to pay, I can't afford to spend thousands of bucks every year on new gear.
Seriously, my "newest" body is 6 years old at this point, it's a 40d (a broken one, but that's another story). In fact I think the last new lens I bought was my 17-40L in 2009 or 2010, everything else is 5+ years old, you dont have to have the newest, bad-ass stuff. But you can try to best use what you have. I mean certainly even the 28-135 can be used to take acceptable photos in the hands of a competent photog.

I dont think ANY Of us spend thousands of dollars a year on gear. Except maybe Mitch, but he's a baller...

Although admittedly I am about to spend almost $500 to repair my 40d and 70-200 which was damaged in October.

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Old 07-26-2013, 01:01 PM   #31
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Yes, A friend of mine was able to grab this with his Non-IS 70-200mm F4.0L, which led me to the decision to get it over the IS Version.
The 70-200/4 non-is is a fine lens. It used to be a real bargain at around $500 when I bought it, I dont know what they run now. You dont NEED IS. It's nice to have, but you can do without it.

Let me put this out there too, there are value lenses out there which perform "almost as good" as L lenses:
28-105 USM II
70-210 3.5-4.5 USM (not the 70-210 F4)
100-300L (lacks USM, but is an old, very sharp L lens)

These are older, discontinued lenses which you have to buy used, but they are reasonable. I own the 28-105 USM II, it cost me $135, is superior to the 28-135, and "almost as good" as the 24-105L, but lacks IS and is just a little less wide on the wide end, but has less barrel distortion at the wide end than the 24-105L, is smaller and MUCH lighter too.

Again, take all this as constructive criticism, and practice.

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Old 07-26-2013, 06:21 PM   #32
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How do you determine the optimal aperture anyways?
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:51 PM   #33
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That's Photography 101. Read this http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/focus.htm
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:07 PM   #34
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Now that you've gotten a shot from this spot in you do realize you are only only 12 miles from Pittsburgh.......
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:15 PM   #35
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How do you determine the optimal aperture anyways?
Get this book...you'll thank me later.

http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-.../dp/0817439390
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:54 PM   #36
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Now that you've gotten a shot from this spot in you do realize you are only only 12 miles from Pittsburgh.......
Oh I know, but my parent won't drive to Pittsburgh and I'll probably drop over trying to bike there.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:29 PM   #37
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Get this book...you'll thank me later.

http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-.../dp/0817439390
Any other books you recommend, such as composing excellent and quality shots?
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:02 PM   #38
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How do you determine the optimal aperture anyways?


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Oh I know, but my parent won't drive to Pittsburgh and I'll probably drop over trying to bike there.
I didnt realize I was dealing with a juvenile here. I guess you have the rest of your life to figure it out.

I stopped reading this thread after this post, find a book called "understanding exposure", that's a good start.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:21 PM   #39
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So because of my age, I'm not going to get any further help then an aperture book?
Well, wouldn't be the first time I self taught myself. Should've kept that post to myself.

*Update: Bought the book on my tablet. Will be reading it shortly.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:45 PM   #40
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https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=G...m&z=12&start=0
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:50 PM   #41
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So because of my age, I'm not going to get any further help then an aperture book?
Well, wouldn't be the first time I self taught myself. Should've kept that post to myself.

*Update: Bought the book on my tablet. Will be reading it shortly.
That's not what I said. I stopped reading the thread after that, so I dont know what other suggestions were made. Quite honestly I am surprised you were able to procure a semi-pro camera body without even knowing the basics of photography. Congrats on that.

So that begs the question, what mode were you shooting in? I am guessing some program mode? Full auto?

Read the understanding exposure book cover to cover, then re-read it. Go out and take pictures of something other than trains until you can nail the exposure in at minimum shutter priority mode (TV), if not full manual (M).

I'm gonna go out on a limb and say most of us shoot in manual mode.

There used to be a saying "F8 and be there", you will learn why when you read the book.

A little cheat for you, it's been my experience that with crop sensor digital cameras, any aperture smaller than F13 is actually counterproductive. I find even attempting much more than F10 is counterproductive.

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Old 07-26-2013, 11:02 PM   #42
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Actually I shot it in manual mode. I was told to stay at 1/500-1/640 and adjust the aperture per the meter in the viewfinder says. At least I'm reading a book now.

It's hard to tell someone's attitude when it comes to reading text. I took it the wrong way as usual, sorry.
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Old 07-26-2013, 11:11 PM   #43
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The whole reason I asked about the aperture setting is because you were able to just say F/8. That made me ask how you made this determination. Nothing more then that. Ever since I started using manual I've been using that little meter.
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Old 07-27-2013, 12:18 AM   #44
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Troy you seem like you need a hug.
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Old 07-27-2013, 12:22 AM   #45
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A little cheat for you, it's been my experience that with crop sensor digital cameras, any aperture smaller than F13 is actually counterproductive. I find even attempting much more than F10 is counterproductive.
To put some meat on that bone, the issue is called diffraction and it is a matter of optics and so cannot be engineered away. The result is a loss of sharpness. With a corp sensor I never go past f/10, usually f/8, unless I have some unusual need and am willing to accept the tradeoff.

That unusual need is usually (always?) a need for a slow shutter speed in bright light where I don't have time to mount a neutral density filter and so have to limit light in some other way.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...fraction.shtml
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Old 07-27-2013, 01:27 AM   #46
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It's hard to tell someone's attitude when it comes to reading text. I took it the wrong way as usual, sorry.
If you're going to post on these forums alot, get used to people disagreeing with you.
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Old 07-27-2013, 01:55 AM   #47
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Rule one in Rail Photography 101 - F/8 and be there.
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Old 07-27-2013, 02:36 AM   #48
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Rule one in Rail Photography 101 - F/8 and be there.
I'm assuming a smart thing to do would be to program F/8.0 in the custom settings bank on my 60D when it arrives.
Maybe sometime toward the end of the year I can get some better glass, but first - a trip into books to learn what and what not to do.
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Old 07-27-2013, 03:12 AM   #49
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Maybe I've been lucky, but I've had two Canon 28-135 lenses in the past ten years, and each one was quite sharp at f8. It can be a pretty good lens. Several of my shots on RP were taken with one.

The Canon non-IS 70-200 f4 is the sharpest lens I've ever owned. It even beats the Canon 50mm 1.8 and 24-104 f4. Nice and light, too.

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Old 07-27-2013, 03:42 AM   #50
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Maybe I've been lucky, but I've had two Canon 28-135 lenses in the past ten years, and each one was quite sharp at f8. It can be a pretty good lens. Several of my shots on RP were taken with one.

The Canon non-IS 70-200 f4 is the sharpest lens I've ever owned. It even beats the Canon 50mm 1.8 and 24-104 f4. Nice and light, too.

Jeff Terry
From what I understand, the 28-135 is a hit or miss lens. You either like it or you don't. Sometimes it can be decently sharp, and other times it can be as dull as a butter knife.

I especially cannot wait for my telephoto L. The first thing I'll probably try with it is star photos until I can grab a telescope and a canon adapter for it. But before I do any of that, of course I must learn and study photography.
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