Old 11-18-2008, 07:05 PM   #1
NYC Nick
Member
 
NYC Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Elyria, Ohio/Kent, Ohio
Posts: 64
Default Essentials and Other Useful Items

I was wondering if there were any camera accessories that you thought were especially important or useful. I have a Nikon D80 and a lens, but that's about it. By the way, this could be stuff for taking train pictures or photography in general.
__________________
Nicholas Resar
"A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad." -Theodore Roosevelt
NYC Nick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 07:24 PM   #2
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,202
Default

lens pen, spare battery, spare memory card

some will say a tripod is essential, but to me it depends on what kind of photography you are doing and how serious you are about it - certainly I often don't use one and get my shots, and certainly I miss on things sometimes when I don't have one with me
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 07:25 PM   #3
travsirocz
Senior Member
 
travsirocz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 2,459
Send a message via AIM to travsirocz
Default

tripod
pointer finger - for the trigger
remote
hoodie for sunny days - it's ok since I don't use it much
gps logger - would like to have when in unknown areas
cleaning supplies and blower
zip lock bag for rain
travsirocz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 08:32 PM   #4
jnohallman
Senior Member
 
jnohallman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,527
Default

A circular polarizer. I never realized just how useful it was until I got one.

Jon
__________________
"Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it." - Mark Twain

Click here to see my photos on RP.net!

Do not, under any circumstances whatsoever, click here. Don't even think about it. I'm warning you!
jnohallman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 08:47 PM   #5
travsirocz
Senior Member
 
travsirocz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 2,459
Send a message via AIM to travsirocz
Default

Battery grip if available - verticle controls and more battery life
travsirocz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 09:16 PM   #6
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,843
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnohallman
A circular polarizer. I never realized just how useful it was until I got one.

Jon
Indeed. However, it just sucks that you tend to lose about 2 stops of light. That can make a big difference if you don't have a fast lens and a train is moving quickly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by travsirocz
Battery grip if available - verticle controls and more battery life
Ditto.
JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 10:17 PM   #7
bigbassloyd
Senior Member
 
bigbassloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Hilldale, West Virginia
Posts: 3,865
Default

Tripod was the world to me!

Not so much to prevent blur, but the ability to frame the composition, and then walk around and enjoy life until the train gets there. Plus if you suffer from "follow the lead engine" syndrome, it will stop that too!

Loyd L.
__________________
Those who seek glory, must also seek infamy.

My personal photography site
bigbassloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 10:25 PM   #8
Mustang11
Senior Member
 
Mustang11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Deep River, CT
Posts: 131
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbassloyd

the ability to frame the composition, and then walk around and enjoy life until the train gets there.
That is one of the best parts of using a tripod... Only other thing I would recommend is a lens cleaning "pen"

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA280_.jpg

Not the exact one I have but anything like it with the capped cleaning pad on one end and the retractible brush on the other. Perfect for in the field cleaning.

Brian
__________________
"If I could tell the story in words, I wouldn't need to lug around a camera" - Lewis Hine

My RailPictures.net Photos -- My fotopic.net Photos
Graphic Design & Photography portfolio site
Mustang11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 10:47 PM   #9
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,092
Default

1. General purpose lens like 18-200mm to avoid changing lenses, missing shots and getting dust on your sensor

2. Holster case for easy carry and quick draw

3. Eye loop with neck lanyard for real-time exposure adjustments

4. Microfiber cleaning cloth

5. Rocket blower for sensor cleaning
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Albums from Steam Railroads all over the US.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 11:07 PM   #10
Mike B.
Banned
 
Mike B.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,343
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM
1. General purpose lens like 18-200mm to avoid changing lenses, missing shots and getting dust on your sensor
2. Quality glass so you get high IQ.
Mike B. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 11:30 PM   #11
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM
3. Eye loop with neck lanyard for real-time exposure adjustments
What is an "eye loop"?
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 11:52 PM   #12
Walter S
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 1,023
Send a message via AIM to Walter S
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
What is an "eye loop"?

I got one and used it once. I just find holding your arm over the screen is much easier.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...een_Loupe.html
Walter S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 12:11 AM   #13
lock4244
Senior Member
 
lock4244's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The City Below Vaughan
Posts: 1,048
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM
1. General purpose lens like 18-200mm to avoid changing lenses, missing shots and getting dust on your sensor
I shoot with fixed focal lenses and change them numerous times a day. I get dust on the sensor, but not very often.

Mentioned earlier by Lloyd regarding a tri-pod, shooting with fixed lenses is another great way to avoid following the lead engine!

Essentials to me are (in no paricualr order):

A radio scanner
Extra batteries for the scanner
A vertical grip/battery pack (esp. in winter... and it looks waaay cooler than a camera without one)
Additional CF cards (don't limit your shooting by carrying only one)
Map(s)
Good book or magazine... railfanning can get boring
Beer (OK, so someone is reading this list, just checking)
Giant camera bag to carry all of your fixed lenses around in
A step ladder
Axe/pruning shears to clear brush
Lens cleaning cloth and a lens pen
__________________
Mike Lockwood

Insert witty comment here

Hot girl on girl action here!

More Pics Here
lock4244 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 01:38 AM   #14
travsirocz
Senior Member
 
travsirocz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 2,459
Send a message via AIM to travsirocz
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
What is an "eye loop"?
http://www.hoodmanusa.com/products.asp?dept=1017
travsirocz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 02:27 AM   #15
jnohallman
Senior Member
 
jnohallman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,527
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lock4244
Axe/pruning shears to clear brush
How about a small chainsaw instead?

Jon
__________________
"Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it." - Mark Twain

Click here to see my photos on RP.net!

Do not, under any circumstances whatsoever, click here. Don't even think about it. I'm warning you!
jnohallman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 02:38 AM   #16
lock4244
Senior Member
 
lock4244's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The City Below Vaughan
Posts: 1,048
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnohallman
How about a small chainsaw instead?

Jon
Eventually... when I have a garage to store it in. Right now, I don't relish the idea of storing a chainsaw in my condo, and keeping it in my locker? Big PITA just to get access to that.

Ideally, shape charges would be the fastest solution, but I can forsee a few issues with that
__________________
Mike Lockwood

Insert witty comment here

Hot girl on girl action here!

More Pics Here
lock4244 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 10:52 AM   #17
Watain
-_-
 
Watain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Hiltons, Virginia, USA
Posts: 953
Send a message via MSN to Watain
Default

Here's a few of my have to haves.

1. Uniden Bearcat BCT-15 mounted on the dash+ magnet mount antenna on the roof. About a 20+ mile range from what I can generally hear.

2. Uniden BC60XLT for walking around use.

3. A 24 pack of Duracell's.

4. Nikkor 18-135, and a cheap Quantaray 70-300 that is on the verge of replacement by a good lens.

5. I find an extra memory card usefull as well.

6. Tri pod for that night shot I have yet to take.

7. 2 Microfiber cloths and a blower bulb.

8. Office Depot lcd screen cleaner, I use it to clean my lenses with and it works great.

9. Flash Diffuser ''Puffer'' I dont use flash for train photography, but I find it useful for other things.

Thats about all I can think of. A battery grip would be nice but B&H keeps selling out of D80 grips.
Watain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 11:13 AM   #18
milwman
I shoot what I like
 
milwman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cedar Fall's, Iowa
Posts: 2,474
Send a message via Yahoo to milwman
Default

The right bag helps, for some its a back pack and for others its a hard case. Like most i work out of a car, truck or My JEEP, have a roller case that stays in the JEEP and a smaller one that i pack with what i may need on a walk in shot.

A tripod, the one thing that helps with framing and sharp photo's

Maps, a good topo map saves Gas, time, and shows tracks for planing shots and routs in and out.

And back in film days a level for the hard to tell times if its level, now with PS i don't cary it.
__________________
Richard Scott Marsh I go by Scott long story

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22299476@N05/
milwman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 11:52 AM   #19
TAMR159
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 367
Default

My advice - don't bother with a scanner. The second you do any urban railfanning, all you'll get is intermod bleeding over and ultimately turn it off because it's too annoying. Pick up a commercial radio (programmed to RECEIVE only) or an amateur radio instead. Rock solid, far better reception than a radio, virtually no intermod on either (you can pretty much park underneath one of the NOAA weather stations with a commercial radio and never hear a peep out of it), better audio, and should you live in a state where scanners are illegal (such as my lovely home state of New York), these alternatives are perfectly legal. Did I mention that amateur radios are priced pretty much the same as scanners?

Besides that...pretty much a spare everything (keeping your old body when you upgrade can be a life-saver). Battery pack, extra memory card, tripod (a good, heavy one), something with good gas mileage that still does well off-roads (Subaru?), maps or a GPS (both helpful, but neither beat exploring the line and learning your chase roads and shots first-hand). Scouting your route beforehand, via internet sources (maps, other peoples' photos, frequencies, train operations info, timetables, etc., etc.), along with some initial exploration before the chase is on will also make your life a LOT easier.

And, of course, dress for the weather. Some good work boots and a Carhartt with some long underwear and a couple pairs of socks beneath will do you much good during the winter months. And some nice, warm gloves with enough flexibility to still operate your camera.
TAMR159 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 12:14 PM   #20
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,092
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter S
I got one and used it once. I just find holding your arm over the screen is much easier.

No fair Walter, your eyes are about 30 years younger than mine!

Seriously, as a relative old guy, I find the eye loop (loup?) very useful as it shades the sun out completely and permits my aging eyes to see the image clearly. You can spend 80 bucks with B&H and buy the "Mercedes" or you can get a cheap eye loop, glue some felt on it (to protect your LCD) and do just as well. If you see a guy with this "thingy" around his neck at an upcoming photo charter, it is probably me.
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Albums from Steam Railroads all over the US.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2008, 12:59 AM   #21
Watain
-_-
 
Watain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Hiltons, Virginia, USA
Posts: 953
Send a message via MSN to Watain
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TAMR159
My advice - don't bother with a scanner. The second you do any urban railfanning, all you'll get is intermod bleeding over and ultimately turn it off because it's too annoying. Pick up a commercial radio (programmed to RECEIVE only) or an amateur radio instead. Rock solid, far better reception than a radio, virtually no intermod on either (you can pretty much park underneath one of the NOAA weather stations with a commercial radio and never hear a peep out of it), better audio, and should you live in a state where scanners are illegal (such as my lovely home state of New York), these alternatives are perfectly legal. Did I mention that amateur radios are priced pretty much the same as scanners?
I was originally going to get a Yaesu mobile radio, but I guess I am a hardcore scanner guy. I still get intermod but compared to my old Rat Shack that had no selectivity and would just lock on a signal such as a pager and stay there its nothing.
Watain is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.