Old 04-10-2008, 06:52 PM   #1
ccaranna
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Default But it isn't

Or am I losing my mind? Rejected and appeal denied for "underexposed"

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=508497&key=0

The histogram indicates a proper exposure...
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Old 04-10-2008, 07:22 PM   #2
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Looks oversharpened to me. Look at the power lines on the left.
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Old 04-10-2008, 07:34 PM   #3
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just a bit dark on my monitor, think it may just be your monitor is just a touch light? if your's is a bit light you would think the ( screeners ) are nut's? It is a bit dark.
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Old 04-10-2008, 07:47 PM   #4
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Definetely too dark.

I'm not 100% sure about those wires... why are only some jaggy? Is it possible that those have another color wire wrapped around them making them appear jaggy?
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Old 04-10-2008, 07:59 PM   #5
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The sharpness looks fine, but I too think the shot is a bit underexposed.


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Old 04-10-2008, 08:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freericks
Definetely too dark.

I'm not 100% sure about those wires... why are only some jaggy? Is it possible that those have another color wire wrapped around them making them appear jaggy?
Thanks for the replies everyone. I guess I could bring the levels up to brighten it, but would that be considered overmanipulation? It was early evening when I took the photo, and the sun was low in the sky. Is there a "Low-sun" rejection?

I realize that the angle is nothing exciting, nor is the power. I think I need to accept the fact that boring angles and common power will only be accepted here if the light is banal and completely lacking in variety (just like the composition).

As far as the wires, I think Freericks is correct, though I can't recall. I'm definitely familiar with the jaggy problem with oversharpening.
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Old 04-10-2008, 08:28 PM   #7
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Bringing up the levels a bit is no different from opening up 1/3 stop back film days to compensate for a dark subject! Over do it and it looks unrealistic, but when the subject is black, it often needs a bit of brightening. I think this is one of those shots that is technically not underexposed but looks underexposed. A touch of curves should fix that. Not sure about the jaggies on the wires, that can happen in over sharpening, but the rest of the image doesn't look over sharpened, or it can happen in downsizing the image for RP. What method did you use?

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Old 04-10-2008, 08:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a231pacific
Bringing up the levels a bit is no different from opening up 1/3 stop back film days to compensate for a dark subject! Over do it and it looks unrealistic, but when the subject is black, it often needs a bit of brightening. I think this is one of those shots that is technically not underexposed but looks underexposed. A touch of curves should fix that. Not sure about the jaggies on the wires, that can happen in over sharpening, but the rest of the image doesn't look over sharpened, or it can happen in downsizing the image for RP. What method did you use?

Michael Allen
Hi, Michael! Thanks for replying.

Here's what I did for downsizing the image: After I leveled and cropped, I enlarged the image to show actual pixels and then resized it to 1024 horizontal. (Typically the vertical works out to be around 600-700) Then I level adjust and sharpen if I feel it needs either of the last two adjustments.

As far as dark subjects I have a question however- I thought that dark subjects tended to overexpose the image, and vice-versa if the subject is white? For example, scenes with a predominace of snow tend to underexpose, and conversely our NS pictures overexpose because the camera sees too much dark?

Last edited by ccaranna; 04-10-2008 at 08:49 PM.
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Old 04-10-2008, 08:54 PM   #9
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Actually, I think I just answered my own question...if I recall, I metered the scene BEFORE the train arrived, thus making the exposure correct if it was an empty landscape WITHOUT the train. The fact that the engines happened to be black when they entered the stage makes it looked underexposed.
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Old 04-10-2008, 10:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccaranna
Actually, I think I just answered my own question...if I recall, I metered the scene BEFORE the train arrived, thus making the exposure correct if it was an empty landscape WITHOUT the train. The fact that the engines happened to be black when they entered the stage makes it looked underexposed.
Actually, the color of the engines shouldn't have anything to do with the appearance of the rest of the scene. If you metered for the scene (off the sky or ballast?), in low sun it's possible the camera "lied" to you a little. Your image looks like an unprocessed RAW file to me. Some simple auto-contrast and auto-levelling in photoshop should make it pop.
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Old 04-10-2008, 10:44 PM   #11
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I would agree with the responses here too, not sure what exactly is the reason of being under exposed or not, but it is dark and lacking that punch it should have with such sunny skies. It just has a "heavy smog" look to the shot and lacks that vibrant impact.

My 2 cents, Rich
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:09 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccaranna
Actually, I think I just answered my own question...if I recall, I metered the scene BEFORE the train arrived, thus making the exposure correct if it was an empty landscape WITHOUT the train. The fact that the engines happened to be black when they entered the stage makes it looked underexposed.
It's actually the sky, ballast and trees. Just brighten the picture a little and I think you'll be happy with it.

It is possible that your monitor is too bright. My monitor at home is too bright (at the lowest setting), so I always have to adjust slightly.
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