Old 09-15-2020, 12:38 AM   #1
TedG
Member
 
TedG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Perry Hall, MD
Posts: 53
Default UV filter...What's your opinion/experience?

Do you keep a UV filter "permanently" mounted to protect your lens' outer element? Or do you feel the extra layer of glass adversely affects the results achieved with your highly-engineered lens?
/Ted
TedG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2020, 01:33 AM   #2
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,102
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TedG View Post
Do you keep a UV filter "permanently" mounted to protect your lens' outer element?
I used to. Over the years, I think I have purchased a UV filter for just about every lens I own. It's not so much to protect the front element from impact, but more because over time, cleaning the front element gradually erodes the coatings, and I'd rather do that to a $50 filter than to a $2,000 lens. That said, over time, I have found that the disadvantages outweigh any advantages, so in most case, I shoot all of my workhorse lenses "naked" these days. In my bag, I have a filter case that holds one 77mm UV filter and one 77mm Circular Polarizer, both of which I very rarely use. That's it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TedG View Post
Or do you feel the extra layer of glass adversely affects the results achieved with your highly-engineered lens?
In a word, YES. Having an extra layer of glass often causes flares and ghosting, especially when I am shooting into the light. If there are point sources of light in the frame, a filter almost always makes the effect worse.

I'm just as careful as I can be. When I am done shooting, I always cap my lenses and I NEVER put them down on the ground....EVER. I discover that most people are not nearly as careful, so perhaps for them, the filter is good insurance. My main fear is video guys on charters. Many of them are prone to walking around with fully extended tripods, holding the very top near their body and swinging the long legs back and forth behind them, often with zero regard for the safety of others. Those guys are going to put someone's eye out, or smack someone's expensive lens. When I carry a fully extended tripod (which is rare outside of a night photo session), I carry it vertically, not sticking out 6 feet behind me.
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Albums from Steam Railroads all over the US.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2020, 02:14 AM   #3
ATSF666
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 138
Default

On anything over 50mm no, my 50mm and wider lenses all have filters on them. No reason not to in my opinion as the filters on normal to wide angle lenses have never caused any issues with reflections. Telephotos are another story all together!
__________________

Last edited by ATSF666; 09-16-2020 at 04:15 AM.
ATSF666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2020, 04:21 PM   #4
Decapod401
Senior Member
 
Decapod401's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Lancaster, PA
Posts: 521
Default

I normally don't put filters on my lenses for many of the reasons that Kevin stated. I currently use two lenses, an AF-S Nikkor 24-120, and a Tamron 150-600 VC USD G2.

The front element of the 150-600 is at the very front of the barrel, and is a very large 92mm in diameter. I can't get past the thought that the front element is much more vulnerable than the one on the shorter lens, and I keep a UV filter on it for protection.

The 24-120 serves almost all of my rail needs, while the 150-600 is mainly for wildlife, and now Amish farm scenes, some of which I post on Flickr. I don't see any ill effects from the filter, but I don't generally use that lens for any into-the-light photos.
__________________
Doug Lilly

My RP Pics are HERE.

I've now got a Flickr. account, too.
Decapod401 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2020, 04:49 PM   #5
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,102
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Decapod401 View Post
The front element of the 150-600 is at the very front of the barrel, and is a very large 92mm in diameter. I can't get past the thought that the front element is much more vulnerable than the one on the shorter lens, and I keep a UV filter on it for protection.
There certainly are some lenses that give you cause for pause when it comes to physical protection. With me, it's the Nikkor 14-24 f/2.8G. The front of that lens looks like a big, glass bowl. All it would take is one little smack from "tripod dude" to trash an $1,800 lens. Unfortunately, there's no filter ring on that baby, so I just have to guard it religiously. I rarely take it on charters anyway, because the perspective distortion on trestle shots (the only place I would really need it) is so strong that it can be difficult to correct in post. For wide angle shots, I typically bring the Nikkor 16-35 f/4G, which is significantly lighter, does accept a filter and just "looks" a whole lot less vulnerable.
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Albums from Steam Railroads all over the US.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2020, 02:35 AM   #6
TedG
Member
 
TedG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Perry Hall, MD
Posts: 53
Default

Really well-thought-out commentary, gents. Thanks.
/Ted
TedG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2020, 03:45 PM   #7
Joseph Cermak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Cleveland, Rochester, Erie
Posts: 424
Default

I have a clear element for my 18-140 Nikon Lens, and having tried both the Amazon Basics and the Hoya pieces, there was a huge impact on the amount of lens flares etc from the Amazon version from train headlights. So if you're going to use something, don't cheap out on it.
Joseph Cermak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2020, 12:14 AM   #8
TedG
Member
 
TedG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Perry Hall, MD
Posts: 53
Default

Agreed, Joe. No sense cheaping out by screwing an Amazon Basics filter onto an expensive NIKKOR lens. Besides, Bezos has enough money--he doesn't need mine.

I currently have a HOYA UV(0) PRO1D (77mm) on the AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, and a
HOYA NXT HMC UV (67mm) on the AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm f/4G ED VR.

While I haven't experienced any flaring with those combos (yet), the concern did arise (because I didn't have anything else to worry about this week).

If I can get around to it, I might actually try running some controlled tests...with vs without.
/Ted
TedG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2020, 08:19 PM   #9
Micha01
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Fürth, Germany
Posts: 11
Default

I use UV filters, in analog times skylight filters on all my lens. Flares i can see only in rare cases of backlight. In this cases you can remove the filter, also if you need the last grain of Light. I also agree that cheap filters cause more irritations than good filters. I was glad to have an uv filter as protection on the lens when the lens cover removed in the bag and finally the filter was scratched. 90€ versus 1200€ for the lens. it happend early in the Weekend (such always happens when your are on a longer trip or looking forward to shooting abroad), could go on and bought a new filter following week. If you need the lens to be repaired you miss it at least two weeks. Another reason, if you get dirt or a fingerprint on the filter you can remove it faster than cleaning it, and do this later. A Train won't stop until you've cleaned your lens. Would like to hear the result from your Tests.
br
Micha
Micha01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.