Old 06-23-2017, 04:14 AM   #26
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Don't ignore cameras by Sony. I have used them for years. First was an A100. Now I use an A700 and an A77 and I have no complaints. I like the fact they have image stabilization built into the camera body, among other things. I read once that Nikon uses Sony sensors in some of their cameras.
I feel like people that have been shooting for years don't even consider Sony since they're already heavily invested in lenses with other systems. I'm my experience, it seems like it's mostly younger people who shoot Sony - or at least who shoot mirrorless. I personally shoot on an a6500 and couldn't be happier. The image quality and dynamic range is at the top of its class.
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Old 06-23-2017, 12:38 PM   #27
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Wasn't there a Sony camera that you can use Canon glass on?
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Old 06-23-2017, 12:40 PM   #28
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B & H Nikon D750 full frame with 24-120 F4, includes 64 GB MC, Shoulder Bag and a battery pack. $2296, free shipping and no tax outside NY and NJ. If you are conflicted about tax, in Illinois you can declare on your tax return to ease our states pain, not sure about other states. May be replaced soon but not sure of price drop has not already been factored in.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...mera_with.html

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Old 06-23-2017, 02:38 PM   #29
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The mirrorless cameras certainly have a significant advantage in terms of size and weight. For those who travel by plane and those who hike, it means you can take a lot with you in a fairly small bag. Another advantage is that the image you see in the EVF is the image you are going to get. It makes last second adjustments to exposure much easier to do than with a DSLR. You even get a histogram in the EVF in many cases.

All of that said, there are still some drawbacks. You have to like EVFs, and I personally still have not warmed up to them. I like seeing my subject vs. a video image of my subject. The selection of lenses is not yet as good for mirrorless as it is for DSLRs, although I assume it will catch up at some point. Lens cost appears to be about the same as for an equivalent DSLR lens. And lastly, battery life is an issue. You don't get nearly as many frames on a battery with a mirrorless camera as you do on a DSLR. A battery grip is almost a must for anyone doing any serious shooting. For folks who take just a few frames on each photo excursion, that's not an issue. For charter patrons like me that shoot 800-1000 frames a day or more, you'd better have several batteries with you.
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Old 06-23-2017, 07:30 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
Wasn't there a Sony camera that you can use Canon glass on?
You can use Canon or Nikon glass on pretty much every Sony mirrorless - just as long as you have a decent adapter.

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The mirrorless cameras certainly have a significant advantage in terms of size and weight. For those who travel by plane and those who hike, it means you can take a lot with you in a fairly small bag. Another advantage is that the image you see in the EVF is the image you are going to get. It makes last second adjustments to exposure much easier to do than with a DSLR. You even get a histogram in the EVF in many cases.

All of that said, there are still some drawbacks. You have to like EVFs, and I personally still have not warmed up to them. I like seeing my subject vs. a video image of my subject. The selection of lenses is not yet as good for mirrorless as it is for DSLRs, although I assume it will catch up at some point. Lens cost appears to be about the same as for an equivalent DSLR lens. And lastly, battery life is an issue. You don't get nearly as many frames on a battery with a mirrorless camera as you do on a DSLR. A battery grip is almost a must for anyone doing any serious shooting. For folks who take just a few frames on each photo excursion, that's not an issue. For charter patrons like me that shoot 800-1000 frames a day or more, you'd better have several batteries with you.
Size and weight is the biggest advantage for me. I can carry my camera, an 18-105mm, a 55-210mm, a 12mm, a 35mm, a 50mm, filters, batteries, and also a tripod in a sling bag and have the whole thing weighs only a few pounds. This fits everything I need which means I'm never wishing I had brought something else along.
EVFs have come a long ways in the last couple of years. The refresh rates on the latest ones are incredibly high and the resolution is higher than the eye can see in such a small space. I can certainly understand why some people don't like using them though - especially if you've used a proper optical viewfinder your whole life. The biggest advantage to them is that it pretty much makes metering a thing of the past. You can see your exact exposure in real time, so making adjustments is effortless.
Lens selection definitely isn't anywhere close to the availability that DSLRs have. But that will come with time, hopefully. The ability to adapt any lens that isn't natively available is really nice though.
Batteries are definitely a big drawback. I'm not familiar with Fuji's batteries, but Sony's are especially bad. I usually get around 300-400 shots on one battery. I always have 4 extra batteries in my bag. That's probably overkill though as even with a full day of shooting at the Nevada Northern this last February I only went through two and a half batteries - and that was in the freezing cold. Battery grips are an option, of course, but they you negate the size benefit of having a mirrorless. Luckily the batteries are really small and are easy to pack around in my bag. The latest Sony A9 seems to have remedied this issue to some extent though. The new Sony battery is a little bigger in size but lasts over twice as long. Still, I think that mirrorless will never have the battery life that DSLRs have just from the fact that the sensor is always on.
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Old 06-25-2017, 09:12 PM   #31
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I don't know if it's like this on all the new Canon camera bodies, but I like the fact that you have to press a button to change "mode" now...
Now? My ancient 60Ds have that feature.
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Old 06-25-2017, 09:38 PM   #32
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Now? My ancient 60Ds have that feature.
Well, my newest body until a month ago was a 40D, so...
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Old 07-08-2017, 03:20 AM   #33
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You are getting advice that's all over the place. While most of what's already above is true, I'll offer a suggestion that will give you the best value for your money. I'll start off by saying to not concentrate on the camera--it's just a part of a photo gear system. Think SYSTEM rather than just camera. I'm going to assume you just want something decent that will consistently work and give you the most flexibility and quality. Most everything I have was purchased used, either from ebay or from buy/sell boards on camera forums such as fredmiranda.com. I've bought tens of thousands of dollars worth of used camera gear over the past 17 years, from all over the world. I've not had a bad experience. I get more for my money by buying used gear that's in good condition. Finally, keep in mind that RR photography is the least demanding on camera gear of virtually any genre of photography. You don't need to buy pro level gear to take photos of choo-choos. Some thoughts on pieces of a great system:

1. Nikon D5300. Excellent sensor, low price, plentiful used on ebay. This camera will do what you want and gives 24mp of resolution with great dynamic range. I own one and use it as my travel camera. It's quite compact. $325

2. Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 OS lens. One of the very best lenses you can put on a crop framed camera, and quite affordable. The "f2.8" part means it will allow you to photos in low light too. Can be found for ~$250, which is astonishing.

3. Nikon 70-300mm AFP VR lens. A new lens from Nikon that outperforms lenses costing three times as much (it cost $200 and is generally not available used.) Very sharp lens! Make sure you get the "VR" lens, as there is a cheaper version that does not have "VR." I wouldn't consider the non-VR version no matter how cheap.

4. Sirui tripod with ballhead:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...ht_series.html
This is a nice little tripod that folds up compactly and is light to carry. I consider a tripod to be CRUCIAL for sharp photos. I use one for about 90% of all my shots. Hard to find used ones as people keep good tripods a LONG time. Get a dedicated "L" plate for the camera from ebay ($20.) $200.

5. Photoshop Elements (software.) Half of photography now is software. PSE is the best value out there and you can do a lot with it. About $100.

6. Camera bag, spare battery, memory cards. ~$100.


The above comes to about $1,200 and is a terrific SYSTEM for the money. It will perform as well or better as camera gear costing twice as much. If you can't get great RR photos from the above SYSTEM, you won't be able to blame the gear.

My strategy for camera gear (system) has been to slowly upgrade over the years making carefully thought out choices that will take the kinds of photos I want to take. It all works together and I want no weak pieces. I make choices based on what I want the photos to look like and start with that. (I.e. what gear do I need to make specific photos?) I have a first class tripod/head, the very best available lenses, good software, and into this system I plug in a good used camera every few years. I see the camera as disposable, the least important thing. The system I've listed above will perform very well, is very versatile/flexible, and is an excellent value.


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Old 07-08-2017, 04:56 AM   #34
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I've bought tens of thousands of dollars worth of used camera gear over the past 17 years, from all over the world. I've not had a bad experience.
Wow, can you sell me some of your good luck?
I've had too many problems to list here, and that's just books, videos and coins.
Mostly undisclosed defects and mail loss and damage (mostly due to inadequate packing).

Before you say to check feedback, feedback is a joke because sellers badger buyers for perfect scores. Even if they just did what they were required to by the rules.
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Old 07-08-2017, 01:26 PM   #35
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Wow, can you sell me some of your good luck?
I've had too many problems to list here, and that's just books, videos and coins.
Mostly undisclosed defects and mail loss and damage (mostly due to inadequate packing).

Before you say to check feedback, feedback is a joke because sellers badger buyers for perfect scores. Even if they just did what they were required to by the rules.

By looking carefully at feedback and "reading between the lines", you can usually figure out what kind of person you are dealing with. I generally buy from three types: (1) a guy like me just selling off stuff he doesn't use any more (2) a high volume dealer selling cameras full time (3) a hard core collector selling premium historical gear. I stay away from people that seem clueless about what they are selling, have sold a dozen cheap non-photo items but are suddenly selling a $2,000 lens, or have less than 99% good feedback. Ebay is really cracking down on sellers with negative feedback. I have bought a couple of items with flaws in the past year, all from sellers with very little feedback. The items from them tend to go for less, and I'll take a chance on stuff worth than $500. In both instances the sellers immediately apologized and quickly refunded my money. One item was a D5300 that did not work, and the other was a Nikon 70-300mm AFS lens that was listed as having VR, but when received I found it did not. Again, very fast refund and apology. I lost nothing. This past week I paid $1,200 for an early lens, seller is in Slovenia. The seller has a camera shop and specializes in historical gear. I've bought from him before and his stuff is always excellent. You can also buy warranted refurbs from CametaCamera. They are very reliable full time sellers. I've bought two cameras from them in the past and was totally happy. http://www.cameta.com/refurbished.cfm

Another place I've had 100% excellent luck is buying used on the Fred Miranda website, http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/board/10. Yet another is buying used items from KEH.com. Their reputation is excellent and their service is the best out there. https://www.keh.com/shop/cameras/digital-cameras.html

Digital cameras lose value VERY fast. I don't see any reason to be paying full retail for a new one. I let someone else take the big $$ hit and then load up on the bargains. Doing this has allowed me to put together a system of the very best pieces that is also affordable (almost.) I've been buying/selling on ebay for 17 years now.


Kent in SD

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