Old 01-31-2010, 08:17 PM   #1
crazytiger
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Default Long Exposure shots

I took this shot of the northbound Crescent last night. If you look at it, you will immediately see that it is out of focus. Oh crap. Yeah. I took the pic but because of the low light it wasn't evident that it was OOF. But it is what it is. I am posting this because I was wondering, aside from that what are it's issues? What should I do on future long exposure shots?
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everytime i see non-train photos of yours i think, "so much talent. wasted on trains."
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Old 01-31-2010, 08:26 PM   #2
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Bad angle, and it needs to have a focus point, something to make it interesting. Not a bad attempt though.
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Old 01-31-2010, 08:50 PM   #3
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Take a look at my night photography guide in my signature.

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Old 01-31-2010, 08:54 PM   #4
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I did once. Will do again, Chase.

What about this?
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everytime i see non-train photos of yours i think, "so much talent. wasted on trains."
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Old 01-31-2010, 09:05 PM   #5
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Chase's writeup covers the technical dimensions but not composition/aesthetics. I'm not a night/streak fan, much less a night/streak shooter, but the basics are the basics and the first shot here has no concept of composition that I can see. It is a set of lines through an awkward background. You need to find a setting that "works" as a shot, you can't just pull up to some random spot trackside and do a streak shot, which to my eye it appears you did. So I disagree with coborn, but then it is a first attempt.

The second shot, a little better but still the composition seems weak and there are distracting foreground branches.

Night shooting adds technical difficulty, but it does not obviate the need to compose a nice shot!
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Old 01-31-2010, 09:10 PM   #6
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Ok, thanks for the advice, J.
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Old 01-31-2010, 10:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Bad angle, and it needs to have a focus point, something to make it interesting. Not a bad attempt though.
Agreed. I haven't shot many streaks lately. Many night time shots, for that matter, but the ones I like best have something to look at. (Subjective as to whether the focus point is interesting.)
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Old 02-01-2010, 04:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC View Post
Chase's writeup covers the technical dimensions but not composition/aesthetics. I'm not a night/streak fan, much less a night/streak shooter, but the basics are the basics and the first shot here has no concept of composition that I can see. It is a set of lines through an awkward background. You need to find a setting that "works" as a shot, you can't just pull up to some random spot trackside and do a streak shot, which to my eye it appears you did. So I disagree with coborn, but then it is a first attempt.

The second shot, a little better but still the composition seems weak and there are distracting foreground branches.

Night shooting adds technical difficulty, but it does not obviate the need to compose a nice shot!
I see your point, J. I am working on a way to cover both the technical aspects and the compositions, etc. Perhaps the combination of my night guide and my beginners guide will provide the viewers with a well-rounded idea of how to accomplish a variety of night photos.

Perhaps an updated version of my night guide is in order.

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