Old 05-09-2007, 07:26 PM   #1
Devil 505
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Default Question about sunset shots

I submitted these two shots. The first was rejected for poor lighting-backlit.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=370451&key=0
I thought that nose light was not desired in this type of shot.
The second one was rejected for underexposure
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=922389027
Any help or advice would be appreciated.

Dave
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Old 05-09-2007, 08:09 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil 505
I submitted these two shots. The first was rejected for poor lighting-backlit.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=370451&key=0
I thought that nose light was not desired in this type of shot.
The second one was rejected for underexposure
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=922389027
Any help or advice would be appreciated.

Dave
Dave, others may see differently, but I think both of these shots were taken a couple of seconds too late.

On the first shot, the shadowed front of the locomotive is blending in with the shadowed portion of that building. My personal rule of thumb with backlit shots is, if you can't get the locomotive to "pop" from the scene, the shot probably won't work. If you had taken the shot a couple seconds earlier, the front of the locomotive would be set off by the glinting portion of the building and would have "popped". Since it doesn't pop, it had to be given the poor light rejection. You got a very nice glint on the train though, and the exhaust is a major plus.

Second shot, if the lead locomotive was where the first flatcar is, you would have gotten a more dramatic shot that is closer to being properly exposed, maybe gone with a vertical crop. But I'm not sure it would have enough "pop". It will be interesting to see other's opinions.
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Old 05-09-2007, 08:27 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ken45
Second shot, if the lead locomotive was where the first flatcar is, you would have gotten a more dramatic shot that is closer to being properly exposed, maybe gone with a vertical crop.
Ken, I'm not sure if you mean this or not, but if it had been shot earlier there would have been glint on the lead engine and it would have worked well. Mid-train glint doesn't do it for me. And besides that, it sure is dark; glint works well if there is fairly consistent lighting of some sort across much of the image. This one has a neat splash of light on the building but the rest is just black and not in a way that leads to a pleasing composition of the parts that are lit.

As for the first, I like it. If anything, it could be a bit darker. Shooting the train earlier would also put stronger glint on the engines, same principle as I argued for the second shot.
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Old 05-09-2007, 11:47 PM   #4
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To my mind, the best glint shots have the dark face of the locomotive silhouetted against something lighter. This is often sky, but can be a building or even exhaust. The examples below all illustrate this in one way or another.
Image © Rob Kitchen
PhotoID: 185028
Photograph © Rob Kitchen

Image © Brian Root
PhotoID: 164515
Photograph © Brian Root

Image © Alan John Crotty
PhotoID: 135674
Photograph © Alan John Crotty

I did find a number of examples where the face of the engine was not silhouetted, but usually the photo had good balance and drama due to the glint. In the case of the two photos you submitted, the left side of the picture is mostly dark and the photo feels unbalanced. If you shot a series of shots here, go back and look at the ones where the lead engine was about a half car length further back. Those should be winners.

Good luck.

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Old 05-10-2007, 12:34 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
Ken, I'm not sure if you mean this or not, but if
Yeah, that's what I meant. My brain and fingers weren't communicating very well, and you always manage a more clear and concise explanation than I do.
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Old 05-10-2007, 03:59 PM   #6
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Curious question, did you take more than one shot of the train in the first rejected photo?
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Old 05-10-2007, 05:05 PM   #7
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I did take a couple of shots of the first train, but I got a lot of lens flare in those. That's why I went with the one that I uploaded.
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Old 05-13-2007, 05:40 AM   #8
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I don't see why you would have gotten lens flare in the earlier shots, unless you had framed the shot more to the right. When you are shooting glint shots, you need to look carefully for those flare spots. Use a good lens hood, or hold your hand out to shade the lens. If you've got a buddy, stand in his or her shadow.

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Old 05-13-2007, 06:05 AM   #9
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i would just lower the brightness, it would look better
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