Old 06-12-2008, 03:01 AM   #1
MichaelJ
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Default Calibrating a Computer Monitor

I have a Sony LCD Monitor and I'm having a few problems with it. When I adjust the exposure, brightness and contrast, the photos look fine on my comptuer but are often rejected for bad contrast and overexposed. My photos are accepted when they appear to be too dark and underexposed on my computer. I guess it is obvious I need to adjust the brightness of my monitor but what should I use as a good guide?

A question for the screeners: What type of monitors do you use to screen the photos? What settings do you use?
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Old 06-12-2008, 05:13 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJ
A question for the screeners: What type of monitors do you use to screen the photos? What settings do you use?
The correct settings for any particular monitor will vary from display to display - I've got a pair of identical monitors, and even with identical settings the they look different.
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Old 06-12-2008, 01:26 PM   #3
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There is much voodoo magic involved with monitor calibration and the only way to do it with any kind of accuracy is to use a hardware based monitor calibration solution.

I use the Spyder2Express from Datacolor.
There is also the Pantone Huey.

It is possible to use the eye ball method but it's a bit of hit and miss
Here are a couple of sites that will talk you through it.

http://epaperpress.com/monitorcal/
http://www.photofriday.com/calibrate.php

Cheers,

Christine.

Last edited by Switched out; 06-12-2008 at 01:30 PM.
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Old 06-12-2008, 03:01 PM   #4
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Thanks, everyone.

Christine, I'll try the eye-ball method first given that they other option costs money! :P
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Old 06-12-2008, 04:55 PM   #5
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For a free but somewhat limited solution may I suggest a tool like this:

http://www.photofriday.com/calibrate.php

You can use the tone bar along the top to make sure your brightness and contrast are properly set. If you cant see even increments all the way across the horizontal bar then your settings will prob need adjusting.

This can't help with color adjustment but it can maybe help get you closer to accurate brightness and contrast.

Brian
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