Old 02-23-2008, 03:58 AM   #1
Mustang11
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Default NY Times Railroad Noise Article

Just came across this on the New York Times website, thought some might find it interesting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/17/re...bjects/N/Noise

I personally got a laugh from the "HORN" or "Halt Outrageous Railroad Noise" organization

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Old 02-23-2008, 05:41 AM   #2
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People, like that, really get up my nose. If you decide to buy a house next to a busy railway line, an airport, or a motorway, you have to accept that there's going to be noise, and may increase over time. People who have a tendency to complain about such noise are generally relatively recent residents.
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Old 02-23-2008, 06:33 AM   #3
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You should be able to get used to the noise within a week of moving into your home near a railroad track and sleep right through it when they whistle for crossings. Also, think about whos complaining, someone who lives in a house worth $474,000, so boo hoo to them since the railroad has been there for over a century and they didnt do their homework before moving in.
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Old 02-23-2008, 01:13 PM   #4
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Quote:
WHEN Robert and Kristin Schmid finally found a house they could afford after a long and frustrating search, they were ecstatic. For $474,000, they bought what they believed was their dream house, complete with a backyard and plenty of room for a family someday.

But after moving in and listening to freight trains roaring by in the middle of the night, they soon realized why their tidy colonial had been such a bargain compared with other three-bedrooms in Tappan, in Rockland County.

“We were stunned,” said Mr. Schmid, a Web designer. “We knew the train was there, and that in our budget, we would have to make some sacrifices. But we weren’t prepared for anything this loud and this constant.”


Anyone who buys a half-million dollar house and doesn't do thorough research on the property is an idiot.
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Old 02-23-2008, 03:40 PM   #5
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Quiet zones are stupid and dangerous...


They are not going to be "pioneers" We have several quiet zones in the territory I run. Some have an automate horn at each crossing that is almost as loud as the train whistle...
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Old 02-25-2008, 01:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burner50
Quiet zones are stupid and dangerous...
They are not going to be "pioneers" We have several quiet zones in the territory I run. Some have an automate horn at each crossing that is almost as loud as the train whistle...
The assumption of the wayside horn concept is that the noise will be concentrated right at the crossing (and directed "down the street" towards approaching vehhicles). This significantly reduces the community"footprint" of noise coming from horns on approaching locomotives.
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Old 02-25-2008, 03:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J
The assumption of the wayside horn concept is that the noise will be concentrated right at the crossing (and directed "down the street" towards approaching vehhicles). This significantly reduces the community"footprint" of noise coming from horns on approaching locomotives.


Yeah, the same Idea goes with the assumption that EVERYBODY crosses the tracks at a gated crossing too.


We recently hit a college aged girl in Ames Iowa on a bicycle who was crossing the tracks where there was no crossing.

Didnt even see her coming... She waited till one train went by and walked out in front of the one on the other crossing.

As I said... Stupid and Dangerous.
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Old 02-25-2008, 10:20 PM   #8
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I think it was Florida that banned blwing for crossings a few years back, and fatalities at crossings went through the roof.
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Old 02-29-2008, 12:08 AM   #9
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I know that the horns are used for a reason, and my opion of quiet zones is that their idiotic. However, I would be willing to buy the house. I could take pictures during the winter without having to wait in the cold outside.
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