Old 05-12-2007, 10:38 PM   #1
FLODO
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Default Why was this rejected?

I want your opinion on how this was rejected. I want you to tell me why they did that. I want to see if you agree with them.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=371752
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Old 05-12-2007, 10:56 PM   #2
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I agree with the reason for rejection.

I also believe that the reason for rejection is explained very well. The picture appears to be taken when the sun is very high in the sky (approx. 1130-1530) which causes bad shadows. For best results photos should be taken with the light source behind you which allows for the most light on the subject. In this case the sun is still too high above the train causing the trucks to be in shadows.

- Poor Lighting (High Sun): The angle of the sunlight is too high, a common problem in the summer months of year on mid-day shots.
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Old 05-12-2007, 11:04 PM   #3
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Forgetting the explanation of the reject, just look at the front trucks of the lead locomotive. They're dark while the rest of the loco is in relatively good sun. This is poor lighting up and down.


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Old 05-12-2007, 11:36 PM   #4
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I forgot that the explination would be on the page.
Anyway, is their a way to fix this? Other than the lighting, is this a good picture?
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Old 05-13-2007, 04:17 AM   #5
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Quote:
Anyway, is their a way to fix this?
No, there's no way to get the sun lower in the sky...except wait 'til winter.

A good rule of thumb people use is to look at the shadows under the rail head. If that flange is half or more covered in shadow, the sun it too high.

Another rule of thumb I like to use is looking at the shadow you're casting. If it's much, much shorter than you are tall, the sun is too high...

But the best way is to look at your watch. If it's somewhere between 1130L and 1530L, go grab lunch and run some errands 'cause the sun is too high!
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Old 05-13-2007, 04:24 AM   #6
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High sun can't be fixed in processing, you have to shoot earlier or later in the day, or wait until fall!

You also asked if it's a good photograph. Apart from the lighting, I think there are way too many poles and wires sticking up above the lead engine and the auto that is half cut off by the engine is kind of distracting. Try taking your shot from the other side of the road, and before the train reaches the crossing. You will eliminate most of the poles that way.

Good luck.

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Old 05-14-2007, 04:55 AM   #7
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Aside from the high sun (which is very much there), I like this photo quite a bit (I really don't understand the mentality that says wires and poles in the background are always a bad thing).

My two problems with this photo are:

A) the cropping; it seems too wide

B) it's unlevel. I can't tell if the photo is unlevel, or if it's lens distortion from using a wide angle, but either way the result is the same.

Luckily, problem B is very easy to fix in the course of dealing with problem A. Good luck!
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