Old 12-10-2008, 02:46 AM   #1
Diamond D
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Default Who uses a calibrated monitor here?

I got some prints back from Adorama the other day, and my first thought was "wow, these are DARK." So I did some research, and ran Adobe Gamma.... wow, things look quite different. I know it's a very basic tool, but it really makes me wonder how everyone else has been viewing my images. Things seem quite a bit warmer and darker.

Now the two photos I had printed look very similar to the actual prints, which makes me think I'm looking at a more accurate version on my monitor.

So, now that I feel like a doofus, I'm wondering how many people out there are using calibrated monitors, and if so, what do you use? Adobe Gamma, or a real hardware tool like the Spyder? Seems like is a very important part of the process if you are sharing images either by internet or prints, that is often overlooked.
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Old 12-10-2008, 12:41 PM   #2
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I use Spyder. I don't know how anyone can work on a lot of photos and not have a calibrated monitor.
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Old 12-10-2008, 01:03 PM   #3
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Default Calibration of Monitors

Absolutly essential for good photo work, I use Gretag Mcbeth (now WRite) Eye1. It can be used to calibrate scanners, printers, monitors and cameras.

Don't forget to complete the job though and try to use emmbeded profiles that match your photo print proveders equipement in your our put files.

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Old 12-10-2008, 01:08 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan-crotty
Don't forget to complete the job though and try to use emmbeded profiles that match your photo print proveders equipement in your our put files.
That's wright, Allen! Embeeded profiles boost quality much like a spel chekr does! Always kompleet the jaw-b!
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Old 12-10-2008, 01:10 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travsirocz
I use Spyder. I don't know how anyone can work on a lot of photos and not have a calibrated monitor.
Is that the $60 Spyder II or something more expensive? Please tell me/us about your experience with it. I've had the Spyder II on my list for some time, perhaps it is time to do it. (Well, first I need a wave of new shots to process! Maybe when we get some snow here.)
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Old 12-10-2008, 01:32 PM   #6
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Default Spelling

Sorry Janusz old chap, dyslectic fingers, more haste, less speed

Meaning holds good though.

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Old 12-10-2008, 01:36 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan-crotty
Meaning holds good though.
Yup!

Actually, the question resurfaces from time to time, but I don't recall ever seeing a really good set of guidance or an interesting and readable link. Anyone?

Basically, I've been using program defaults and everything has worked so I've never looked into it. It would be nice to send in an image online and be reasonably confident it will look right when I get the print back. Right now I do 4x6 locally and when it is right I take it down to the store and tell them to make the bigger one look like it. Tedious. But then, I don't print often.

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Old 12-10-2008, 02:16 PM   #8
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I believe eye-one and spyder are the most popular 2 on the market. From what I have read, they both do a good job. There are different software packages that go with them if you just want basic to taking care of everything like your printer.

http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/m...tion_tools.htm
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Old 12-10-2008, 02:37 PM   #9
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I take a printed photo, hold it up next to the screen and then adjust accordingly. VOILA! Works like a charm.
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Old 12-10-2008, 03:41 PM   #10
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This is interesting. Monitor calibration and colour space are not things I've really played with up till now.

I just ran Adobe Gamma on my home PC, which has the effect of overriding the monitor settings (without the profile loaded by Adobe Gamma the screen is now way too bright and at maximum contrast)

Can someone with a properly calibrated monitor just check a couple of my shots please

Image © Stephen Dance
PhotoID: 252054
Photograph © Stephen Dance


This first shot now looks too dark with my adjusted monitor. The loco especially has lost detail in the shadows. Is it the same for you ?


Image © Stephen Dance
PhotoID: 232390
Photograph © Stephen Dance


This shot I had to resubmit about 4 times, on each occasion making it lighter before it was accepted. I thought it now looked too light, but after calibrating with Adobe Gamma, it looks about right. Again, same with you guys and girls ?

Just to say I found using Adobe Gamma difficult. I have red/green colour deficiency and setting the gamma adjustment sliders for the calibration was almost guesswork, trying to match subtle shades against the striped background.

Thanks
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Old 12-10-2008, 04:13 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travsirocz
I believe eye-one and spyder are the most popular 2 on the market. From what I have read, they both do a good job. There are different software packages that go with them if you just want basic to taking care of everything like your printer.
You ducked my question! Tell me about YOUR spyder and YOUR use of it.
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Old 12-10-2008, 04:39 PM   #12
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I have a Spyder, and used it to calibrate my Dell 24" LCD monitor. It was a bit of a chore, as the software is not particularly intuitive. I had to do a little searching online to get the procedure right for LCD monitors, and get Vista to load the proper monitor profile at start-up.

Works ok now, though. My wife just ordered a few 4x6's of the kids through SmugMug, and the prints were pretty much dead on; at least no obvious bright/dark issues or glaring color shifts.

Also had some larger prints made of my oldest daughter's H.S. soccer team for the banquet; they looked pretty good as well, though I didn't make a side-by side comparison with the monitor.

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Old 12-10-2008, 04:40 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
You ducked my question! Tell me about YOUR spyder and YOUR use of it.
I have the cheaper Spyder 2 one since I don't print photos at home. Takes 10 min to do and all you do is click a button or two. It goes through a color sequence and brightness sequence in which the screen sensor does all the work. I have tried to self calibrate my monitor but I ended up making it worse.
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Old 12-10-2008, 05:37 PM   #14
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Put me down as one who calibrates monitor, scanner, etc. It is essential for proper workflow.
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Old 12-10-2008, 09:29 PM   #15
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Default Spectrophotometer

Hi Janusz,

The Gretag Mcbeth eye 1 has been replaced by the i1xTreme produced by X-Rite.

http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=792

Once the software is loaded plug the spectrophotometer into a USB port and run the the software up.

Select the type of monitor to be calibrated LCD. laptop or CRT.

Then choose what gamma setting, I chose 2.2 and colour temperature,I chose 6500 degrees Kelvin which I think is pretty much standard for graphics, followed by a luminance value 100candela for CRT or 120cd for an LCD.

Next you will be prompted to calibrate the Spectrophotometer, this is done be sampling a standard ceramic tile.

You can now sample the ambient lighting so you can have a daylight and room light profile.

Next you will hang the Spectrophotometer on the monitor screen, by following the on screen instruction you use the monitor controls (or pre-sets)to set contrast, colour temperature and luminance. The Spectrophotometer/software guides you though this. Once this is done the software projects a series of colour patches at the Spectrophotometer. The software compares the theoretical and measures colour values (RGB). For this a look up table is produced which is used within the ICC profile.

At the end of the process, which takes 5-10mins you have the opportunity to view the screen before and after calibration.

At every stage the software has good on screen guidance notes.

The same software package can be used to make ICC profiles for printers, ink-jet type or C41 output mini labs such as Fuji Frontier 370.

Additionally Digital projectors, scanners and cameras can be profiled.

The i1 is well made and easy to used and produces very good result. I wouldn't like to be without access to it. It is expensive though, 1000.00 in the UK. I'm lucky that our local camera club owns one and I am the custodian. I make the profiles for members printers and profile their monitors for them.

I hope this is helpful to you?

Alan

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Last edited by alan-crotty; 12-10-2008 at 09:30 PM. Reason: Extra info
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Old 12-12-2008, 01:24 AM   #16
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Spyder Two Express
Don't know what I would do with out it.
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Old 12-12-2008, 11:24 AM   #17
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Put me down as a satisfied user of the Spyder 2 Express it's well worth the expense and trouble to set up.
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Old 12-12-2008, 02:45 PM   #18
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I used the calibration feature of my Paint Shop X2 software. It is real basic. I am real curious about my shots and how they compare on a truely calibrated monitor. If anyone with calibration would like to comment on the "trueness" of my colors, I have included a BNSF orange loco.............

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Old 12-12-2008, 06:12 PM   #19
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Thanks, all, I am bumping the Spyder 2 farther up the list.
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Old 12-12-2008, 11:59 PM   #20
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Both of my computers have the same calibration software the screeners use.
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